Feature Channels: Chemistry

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Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome
University of Copenhagen

he cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery.

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Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT

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Newswise: Ozone Disinfection Could Allow Safe Reuse of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Released: 8-Jul-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Ozone Disinfection Could Allow Safe Reuse of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Georgia Institute of Technology

A new study shows that ozone gas, a highly reactive chemical composed of three oxygen atoms, could provide a safe means for disinfecting certain types of personal protective equipment that are in high demand for shielding health care personnel from Covid-19.

Newswise: Making a Material Impact
Released: 8-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Making a Material Impact
University of Delaware

It’s called CHARM—the University of Delaware’s new Center for Hybrid, Active and Responsive Materials. It will drive fundamental materials science research and enable critical innovations in biomedicine, security, sensing and more.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-reveals-science-behind-traditional-mezcal-making-technique
VIDEO
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Study reveals science behind traditional mezcal-making technique
Brown University

Artisanal makers of mezcal have a tried and true way to tell when the drink has been distilled to the right alcohol level.

Newswise: Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in Nano Letters have developed a wood-based steam generator that, with the help of bacterial-produced nanomaterials, harnesses solar energy to purify water.

Newswise: A New Understanding of Protein Movement
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:20 PM EDT
A New Understanding of Protein Movement
University of Delaware

A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing. This work will lead to the creation of new ways to reduce waste during the expensive drug manufacturing process, enabling more efficient ways of designing and developing manufacturing techniques.

Newswise: Towards improved wound healing – Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
Released: 7-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Towards improved wound healing – Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
University of Vienna

Milestone for therapeutic development of peptides against gastrointestinal disordersThe fascinating family of trefoil factor peptides brings hope to both research and industry to improve the treatment of chronic disorders such as Crohn’s disease. For the first time, a team led by ERC awardee Markus Muttenthaler from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna succeeded in the synthesis and folding of the peptide TFF1, a key player in mucosal protection and repair.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Sorting and secreting insulin by expiration date
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

The age of insulin parcels may matter, researchers say, when it comes to diagnosing and treating diabetes.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Sniffing Out Smell
Harvard Medical School

Neuroscientists reveal for the first time how relationships between different odors are encoded in the brain. Findings may explain why individuals have common but highly personalized experiences with smell, and inform efforts to understand how odor chemistry is translated into perception.

Newswise: West Virginia researchers use neutrons to study materials for power plant improvements
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
West Virginia researchers use neutrons to study materials for power plant improvements
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers from West Virginia University are using neutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study novel materials called high entropy oxides, or HEOs. Their goal is to collect insights into how the atoms in the HEOs bind together and whether the materials can be used to develop useful applications to improve power plant operations.

Newswise: Integrating Variable Signals in Hydrogels
Released: 2-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Integrating Variable Signals in Hydrogels
Department of Energy, Office of Science

All living organisms have systems that can link multiple signals to manage tasks. This ability, called complex signal integration, is not found in artificial systems. This new study demonstrates a pathway for simple, soft artificial materials called hydrogel polymers to use multiple signals from external sources to produce distinct responses.

Newswise: Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Released: 2-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are advancing gas membrane materials to expand practical technology options for reducing industrial carbon emissions.

Newswise: Louis Justement and Mary-Ann Bjornsti begin leadership roles at FASEB
Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Louis Justement and Mary-Ann Bjornsti begin leadership roles at FASEB
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Immunologist Louis Justement, Ph.D., begins his term as president of the largest coalition of biological and biomedical research associations in the United States, FASEB.

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Building a harder diamond
University of Tsukuba

Researchers at the University of Tsukuba used computer calculations to design a new carbon-based material even harder than diamond.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
The Impact Factor of AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Increases to 7.292
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce that the impact factor of its journal, Clinical Chemistry, has risen to 7.292 in the 2019 Clarivate Analytics Journal Citation Reports. This impact factor places Clinical Chemistry in the top 4.2% of 12,838 ranked academic journals and speaks to the significant influence of the science it publishes on laboratory medicine and patient care.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries
Cornell University

A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods.

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Released: 29-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b
University of Exeter

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant 'super-Jupiter' planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Consumers can distinguish between bitter tastes in beer -- doesn't alter liking
Penn State University

Although most beer consumers can distinguish between different bitter tastes in beer, this does not appear to influence which beer they like. It seems they just like beer, regardless of the source of the bitterness.

Newswise: At the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Nanotechnology with Adam Braunschweig
Released: 24-Jun-2020 11:15 AM EDT
At the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Nanotechnology with Adam Braunschweig
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Adam Braunschweig—a CUNY ASRC associate professor—is a user at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) studying how molecules in organic semiconductor thin films pack together.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Evergreen idea turns biomass DNA into degradable materials
Cornell University

A Cornell-led collaboration is turning DNA from organic matter – such as onions, fish and algae – into biodegradable gels and plastics. The resulting materials could be used to create everyday plastic objects, unusually strong adhesives, multifunctional composites and more effective methods for drug delivery, without harming the environment the way petrochemical-based materials do.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines
Ohio State University

Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

Newswise:Video Embedded introducing-a-new-isotope-mendelevium-244
VIDEO
Released: 23-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Introducing a New Isotope: Mendelevium-244
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron has discovered a new form of the human-made element mendelevium. The newly created isotope, mendelevium-244, is the 17th and lightest form of the element, which was first discovered in 1955 by a Berkeley Lab team.

Newswise: Gear treated with ‘forever chemicals’ poses risk to firefighters
Released: 23-Jun-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Gear treated with ‘forever chemicals’ poses risk to firefighters
University of Notre Dame

Graham Peaslee’s team tested more than 30 samples of used and unused PPE from six specialty textile manufacturers in the United States and found them to be treated extensively with PFAS or constructed with fluoropolymers, a type of PFAS used to make textiles oil and water resistant.

Newswise: SLAC and Stanford scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst’s activity
Released: 22-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
SLAC and Stanford scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst’s activity
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

A study identified which pairs of atoms in a catalyst nanoparticle are most active in a reaction that breaks down a harmful exhaust gas in catalytic converters. The results are a step toward engineering cheaper, more efficient catalysts.

Newswise:Video Embedded recell-center-could-save-costly-nickel-and-cobalt-transform-battery-recycling-worldwide
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jun-2020 1:25 PM EDT
ReCell Center could save costly nickel and cobalt, transform battery recycling worldwide
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne’s ReCell Center has already made pivotal discoveries as scientists create and test new recycling processes and battery designs. These discoveries will help grow a globally competitive U.S. recycling industry.

Newswise: Cellular nanosponges could soak up SARS-CoV-2
16-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Cellular nanosponges could soak up SARS-CoV-2
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in Nano Letters have used nanosponges coated with human cell membranes –– the natural targets of the virus –– to soak up SARS-CoV-2 and keep it from infecting cells in a petri dish.

Newswise: Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in, new research finds
Released: 17-Jun-2020 5:25 PM EDT
Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in, new research finds
Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University researchers Elaine Pegoraro, Christina Schädel, Emily Romano, Meghan Taylor and Ted Schuur collaborated on the study, which suggests that traditional methods of permafrost thaw measurement underestimate the amount of previously-frozen carbon unlocked from warming permafrost by more than 100 percent.

Newswise: Chemists developing paper strip urine test for at-home/office/clinic COVID-19 evaluation
Released: 17-Jun-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Chemists developing paper strip urine test for at-home/office/clinic COVID-19 evaluation
Iowa State University

Chemists are developing a paper-strip urine test to detect the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The tests are based on electrokinetics, using electric fields to manipulate charged particles.

Newswise: Research: Key Detergent Polymers Pose Low Risk to Surface Waters
Released: 17-Jun-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Research: Key Detergent Polymers Pose Low Risk to Surface Waters
American Cleaning Institute

Newly published research indicates that an important ingredient used in detergents and cleaning products pose a low ecological risk to waterways. The study, “Environmental risk assessment of polycarboxylate polymers used in cleaning products in the United States,” is published in Chemosphere and is now available via open access. The research was conducted by American Cleaning Institute (ACI), Integral Consulting, Inc. and The Procter and Gamble Company.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 4:00 PM EDT
AACC Elects New Leaders to Serve Terms Starting in August 2020
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce that Stephen R. Master, MD, PhD, FAACC, has been elected to serve on the AACC Board of Directors as president-elect starting in August 2020.

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Released: 15-Jun-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Why pulsars shine bright: A half-century-old mystery solved
Simons Foundation

When Jocelyn Bell first observed the emissions of a pulsar in 1967, the rhythmic pulses of radio waves so confounded astronomers that they considered whether the light could be signals sent by an alien civilization.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Roll over, Aristotle, nature doesn’t always hate a vacuum
Tulane University

The study, published in Nature Chemistry, provides new insights on how to modify the stickiness of these molecular building blocks, allowing engineers to build materials, like gels, from the bottom-up.

Newswise: The many lifetimes of plastics
Released: 15-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
The many lifetimes of plastics
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They’re a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

Released: 15-Jun-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%
University of Michigan

Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon—about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons—is locked away in Arctic permafrost.

Newswise: New test diagnoses COVID-19 virus in patient samples in 30 minutes
10-Jun-2020 4:45 PM EDT
New test diagnoses COVID-19 virus in patient samples in 30 minutes
PLOS

Test relies on RT-LAMP technology which has relatively few barriers to use

Newswise: Water Quality Testing Continues During Pandemic
Released: 10-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Water Quality Testing Continues During Pandemic
South Dakota State University

Senior chemist Beverly Klein tells her experiences doing essential water quality testing during the pandemic--alone.

Released: 10-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Passing Crucial, Challenging Introductory Chemistry Course Gives Biggest Boost to Underrepresented Students
University of Washington

Underrepresented students in STEM received lower grades in a general chemistry series compared to their peers and were less likely to continue. But if underrepresented students completed the first course with at least the minimum grade needed to continue, they were more likely than their peers to do so.

Newswise: Targeting SARS-CoV-2 Enzyme with Inhibitors
4-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Targeting SARS-CoV-2 Enzyme with Inhibitors
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread, many researchers are studying epidemiological models to predict its propagation. However, a mathematician and expert in complex systems decided to focus on finding targets within SARS-CoV-2 for new drugs to attack. In the journal Chaos, he discusses the dramatic increase in the sensitivity of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 to small disturbances, which made him suspect there is a role for inhibitors to play in killing the virus.

Released: 9-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Study Reveals Birth Defects Caused by Flame Retardant
University of Georgia

A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents.

Newswise: Breathing New Life into an Old Question: What Plants’ Emissions Tell Us about their Cell Walls
Released: 9-Jun-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Breathing New Life into an Old Question: What Plants’ Emissions Tell Us about their Cell Walls
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Plants emit gases like methanol and acetic acid that are not directly related to photosynthesis but that have an unknown origin. Researchers have found a possible source: natural chemical modification in the cellulose in plant cell walls and accompanying metabolic changes.

Newswise: Scientists Marry Two Powerful Techniques to Pinpoint Locations of Individual Molecules in Their Cellular Neighborhoods
Released: 8-Jun-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Scientists Marry Two Powerful Techniques to Pinpoint Locations of Individual Molecules in Their Cellular Neighborhoods
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Developed in the lab of Stanford University Nobelist W.E. Moerner, the technique combines cryoelectron tomography and low temperature single-molecule microscopy. It has potential to answer fundamental questions about the molecular machinery of viruses, parasites, and processes like photosynthesis.

Released: 8-Jun-2020 2:00 PM EDT
AACC Launches a New Competition to Support Innovative Research in Diagnostic Testing
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce a new competition that will support cutting-edge research that could significantly improve diagnostic testing and patient care. Winners of the competition will each receive a sample set from AACC’s Universal Sample Bank, which includes blood samples from hundreds of healthy individuals that were collected to aid medical studies.

Newswise: Crystalline ‘Nanobrush’ Clears Way to Advanced Energy and Information Tech
Released: 8-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Crystalline ‘Nanobrush’ Clears Way to Advanced Energy and Information Tech
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory synthesized a "nanobrush" structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information.

Newswise: UTEP Researchers Help Pave Path for Biofriendly Materials to Aid Drug Design Delivery for Neurodegenerative Disorders
Released: 5-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
UTEP Researchers Help Pave Path for Biofriendly Materials to Aid Drug Design Delivery for Neurodegenerative Disorders
University of Texas at El Paso

The contributions of researchers from The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) have yielded the first indication that carbon quantum dots, a class of nanoparticles, can be utilized to combat neurological disorders.

Newswise: Researchers eye manganese as key to safer, cheaper lithium-ion batteries
Released: 4-Jun-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Researchers eye manganese as key to safer, cheaper lithium-ion batteries
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Argonne National Laboratory are developing a technology that centers on manganese, one of Earth’s most abundant metals.

Newswise: ‘Artificial Chemist’ Combines AI, Robotics to Conduct Autonomous R&D
Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:15 AM EDT
‘Artificial Chemist’ Combines AI, Robotics to Conduct Autonomous R&D
North Carolina State University

Researchers have developed a technology called “Artificial Chemist,” which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

Newswise: Showtime for Photosynthesis
Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Showtime for Photosynthesis
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, an international team of researchers has revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
CAP releases 2020 edition of Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists used for inspection of medical laboratories
College of American Pathologists (CAP)

The College of American Pathologists (CAP) released the 2020 edition of its Laboratory Accreditation Program checklists on June 4, 2020. CAP inspectors use the checklists, with approximately 3,000 requirements, during inspections to ensure laboratories comply with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and achieve accreditation.

Newswise: A recipe for eco-concrete
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
A recipe for eco-concrete
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Cement production has to drastically reduce its environmental footprint. Empa researchers are, therefore working on alternative cement recipes that cause significantly fewer emissions or can even bind the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.


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