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Newswise: RUDN University Chemists Discover an Economic Method for Secondary Amines Synthesis
Released: 3-Dec-2021 12:50 PM EST
RUDN University Chemists Discover an Economic Method for Secondary Amines Synthesis
Russian Foundation for Basic Research

RUDN University chemists have proposed the way to construct secondary amines — organic compounds that are widely used in all fields of chemistry. The reaction allows to obtain a product with 97% yield. It goes in visible light and does not require auxiliary reagents.

Newswise: The role of bitter receptors in cancer
Released: 3-Dec-2021 9:00 AM EST
The role of bitter receptors in cancer
University of Vienna

Bitter taste receptors do not only support humans in tasting. They are also found on cancer cells. A team led by Veronika Somoza from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and the German Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has investigated the role they play there. For this purpose, the scientists compiled and evaluated extensive scientific data. Their results suggest that bitter taste receptors should also be considered as additional targets for chemotherapeutic agents in the future and should be investigated in this regard. The systematic review recently appeared in the journal Cancers.

Newswise: Building Better Tools for Biomanufacturing
Released: 2-Dec-2021 7:05 PM EST
Building Better Tools for Biomanufacturing
Georgia Institute of Technology

Advanced cell-based therapies are providing groundbreaking treatment options when other drugs aren’t working. Georgia Tech researchers have developed tool the size of a thumbnail that performs real-time cell analysis, improving efficiency and speeding up the time it takes to create a personalized, life-saving treatment and cures for previously untreatable diseases.

Released: 2-Dec-2021 5:35 PM EST
Wild blue wonder: X-ray beam explores food color protein
Cornell University

A natural food colorant called phycocyanin provides a fun, vivid blue in soft drinks, but it is unstable on grocery shelves. Cornell University’s synchrotron is helping to steady it.

Newswise: Scientists identify another reason why batteries can’t charge in minutes
Released: 2-Dec-2021 2:15 PM EST
Scientists identify another reason why batteries can’t charge in minutes
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne scientists see plating on anode caused by molecular distortions

Newswise: A Newly Discovered Enzyme Makes Ethylene and Methane
Released: 1-Dec-2021 3:10 PM EST
A Newly Discovered Enzyme Makes Ethylene and Methane
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists know that ethylene comes from microbes, but the only known natural microbial processes that produce ethylene require oxygen. But now a team of scientists have discovered an enzyme system from bacteria called methylthio-alkane reductases that work without oxygen, instead scavenging sulfur to produce ethylene, ethane, or methane as a byproduct. The research may have applications in biofuels.

Newswise: Beronda Montgomery to Present Mentoring Keynote
Released: 30-Nov-2021 6:30 PM EST
Beronda Montgomery to Present Mentoring Keynote
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Beronda Montgomery will present the Mentoring Keynote at Cell Bio Virtual 2021 on December 1 at 12:15 PM EST. Montgomery is the Michigan State University Foundation Professor and Assistant Vice President for Research & Innovation at Michigan State University (MSU). She is a member of the faculty of the MSU Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Microbiology & Molecular Genetics.

Newswise: Game-Changing Rare-Earth Elements Separation Technology Licensed to Marshallton
Released: 30-Nov-2021 10:05 AM EST
Game-Changing Rare-Earth Elements Separation Technology Licensed to Marshallton
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Developed by scientists from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory in the Department of Energy’s Critical Materials Institute, the technology provides insight into how to cost-effectively separate in-demand rare-earth elements.

Newswise: Seeking to Reduce Carbon Footprint with Foot on Two Continents
Released: 29-Nov-2021 10:05 PM EST
Seeking to Reduce Carbon Footprint with Foot on Two Continents
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Johannes Lercher, Battelle Fellow and director of the PNNL Institute for Integrated Catalysis, envisions energy storage solutions at the new Energy Sciences Center.

Newswise: We Might Not Know Half of What’s in Our Cells, New AI Technique Reveals
22-Nov-2021 4:25 PM EST
We Might Not Know Half of What’s in Our Cells, New AI Technique Reveals
University of California San Diego Health

Artificial intelligence-based technique reveals previously unknown cell components that may provide new clues to human development and disease.

Newswise: Is Your Alcohol Sanitizer Safe and Effective? Chula’s Pharmaceutical Science Has Developed a User-friendly and Rapid Test Kit to Keep People Away from COVID-19.
Released: 24-Nov-2021 8:55 AM EST
Is Your Alcohol Sanitizer Safe and Effective? Chula’s Pharmaceutical Science Has Developed a User-friendly and Rapid Test Kit to Keep People Away from COVID-19.
Chulalongkorn University

Chula Pharmaceutical Science helps increase public confidence to keep COVID-19 at bay with their new test kit to verify the safety and efficacy of hand sanitizers and alcohol-based gel and spray products.

Released: 23-Nov-2021 2:05 PM EST
Researchers use AI to optimize several flow battery properties simultaneously
Argonne National Laboratory

To find the right battery molecules, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have turned to the power of artificial intelligence to search through a vast chemical space of over a million molecules and optimize for several properties.

Newswise: Chemical researchers invent bio-petroleum for sustainable materials
Released: 23-Nov-2021 8:25 AM EST
Chemical researchers invent bio-petroleum for sustainable materials
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A team of researchers from the U.S. National Science Foundation Center for Sustainable Polymers based at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities have developed a chemical technology of combined fermentation and chemical refining that can produce petroleum-like liquids from renewable plants. These renewable liquids could serve as a more sustainable replacement for today’s fossil fuels used to make everyday products like plastic containers and bags, automobile parts, lubricants, and soaps.

19-Nov-2021 11:40 AM EST
Vehicles are an under-recognized source of urban ammonia pollution
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers report in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology Letters that satellite data from before & during the spring 2020 lockdown in Los Angeles shows that vehicles are the main source of urban airborne ammonia, which forms small particles that contribute to air pollution & harm human health.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-gets-airborne
VIDEO
Released: 22-Nov-2021 3:40 PM EST
COVID Gets Airborne
University of California San Diego

In May 2021, the Centers for Disease Control officially recognized that SARS-CoV-2 is airborne. Now UC San Diego Professor Rommie Amaro has modeled the delta virus inside an aerosol for the first time.

Released: 22-Nov-2021 11:05 AM EST
Argonne’s Giselle Sandi wins 2021 Motivator Award
Argonne National Laboratory

The Chicago Chapter of the Association for Women in Science has awarded Giselle Sandi a 2021 Motivator Award. This award recognizes her mentorship and support for women.

Newswise: Designing Microbe Factories for Sustainable Chemicals
Released: 19-Nov-2021 6:15 PM EST
Designing Microbe Factories for Sustainable Chemicals
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have devised a way to engineer yeast to produce sustainable, eco-friendly commodity chemicals using computing power as a guide.

Newswise: Stalagmites as key witnesses of the monsoon
Released: 18-Nov-2021 3:25 PM EST
Stalagmites as key witnesses of the monsoon
Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry

The ice sheets of Greenland are melting at an alarming rate. This causes large amounts of freshwater to flow into the North Atlantic, thereby slowing the Gulf Stream.

Newswise:Video Embedded tri-lab-effort-makes-strides-toward-increasing-supply-of-ac-225
VIDEO
Released: 18-Nov-2021 2:50 PM EST
Tri-Lab effort makes strides toward increasing supply of Ac-225
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

With multiple clinical trials under way, it’s likely both a drug using Ac-225 and increased demand for the radioisotope are in the near future — and the U.S. Department of Energy wants to be ready. Since 2015, DOE’s Isotope Program has sponsored the Tri-Lab Effort to Provide Accelerator-produced Ac-225 for Radiotherapy. Thorium-232 targets are irradiated in proton accelerators at Los Alamos and Brookhaven national laboratories, then sent to ORNL for processing in hot cells dedicated to alpha radiation. The purpose: producing bigger batches, faster. In June, ORNL processed the largest batch of Ac-225 ever put in inventory.

Newswise: Study challenges standard ideas about piezoelectricity in ferroelectric crystals
Released: 18-Nov-2021 2:35 PM EST
Study challenges standard ideas about piezoelectricity in ferroelectric crystals
Penn State Materials Research Institute

For years, researchers believed that the smaller the domain size in a ferroelectric crystal, the greater the piezoelectric properties of the material. However, recent findings by Penn State researchers have raised questions about this standard rule.

Newswise:Video Embedded exploding-and-weeping-ceramics-provide-path-to-new-shape-shifting-material
VIDEO
Released: 18-Nov-2021 6:05 AM EST
Exploding and weeping ceramics provide path to new shape-shifting material
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

An international team of researchers from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and Kiel University in Germany have discovered a path that could lead to shape-shifting ceramic materials. This discovery could improve everything from medical devices to electronics.

Newswise: Team Earns Gordon Bell Prize Finalist Nomination for Simulating Carbon at Extreme Pressures and Temperatures
Released: 17-Nov-2021 12:20 PM EST
Team Earns Gordon Bell Prize Finalist Nomination for Simulating Carbon at Extreme Pressures and Temperatures
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A team used machine-learned descriptions of interatomic interactions on the 200-petaflop Summit supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to model more than a billion carbon atoms at quantum accuracy and observe how diamonds behave under extreme pressures and temperatures.

12-Nov-2021 11:30 AM EST
New approach could overcome fungal resistance to current treatments
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers report in ACS Infectious Diseases that they have identified compounds that tackle fungal resistance in a new way — by interfering with fungal enzymes required for fatty acid synthesis — potentially opening the door to better therapies.

12-Nov-2021 12:15 PM EST
A wild strawberry aroma for foods — from a fungus growing on fruit waste
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have come up with a naturally derived wild strawberry aroma by having an edible fungus make it from waste from black currant juice production.

Newswise: Artificial intelligence successfully predicts protein interactions
Released: 16-Nov-2021 5:25 PM EST
Artificial intelligence successfully predicts protein interactions
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern and University of Washington researchers led an international team that used artificial intelligence (AI) and evolutionary analysis to produce 3D models of eukaryotic protein interactions. The study, published in Science, identified more than 100 probable protein complexes for the first time and provided structural models for more than 700 previously uncharacterized ones. Insights into the ways pairs or groups of proteins fit together to carry out cellular processes could lead to a wealth of new drug targets.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 12:05 PM EST
A better-fitting molecular ‘belt’ for making new drugs
Ohio State University

New research, published today in the journal Chem, proposes a way to simplify the molecular transformation that allows pharmaceutical makers to produce new drug candidates.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 9:00 AM EST
Unraveling the pseudoknot: Research to explore the ‘switch’ behind COVID virus
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Binghamton University Chemistry Professor Eriks Rozners has received a two-year $428,330 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for a research project which explores the "switch" behind the coronavirus.

Newswise: Research in Brief: First-Ever Interior Earth Mineral Discovered in Nature
Released: 15-Nov-2021 3:35 PM EST
Research in Brief: First-Ever Interior Earth Mineral Discovered in Nature
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV geochemists have discovered a new mineral on the surface of the Earth. Coined "davemaoite" and entrapped in a diamond, the mineral traveled from a depth of at least 410 miles deep within the Earth's lower mantle.

Newswise: Combining pressure, electrochemistry to synthesize superhydrides
Released: 15-Nov-2021 11:00 AM EST
Combining pressure, electrochemistry to synthesize superhydrides
University of Illinois Chicago

A new study featured in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers a potential alternate approach that combines pressure and electrochemistry to stabilize superhydrides at moderate, perhaps even close to ordinary, pressures.

Newswise: Meet VMS – the briefcase-sized chemistry lab headed to Venus
Released: 10-Nov-2021 3:50 PM EST
Meet VMS – the briefcase-sized chemistry lab headed to Venus
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Short for Venus Mass Spectrometer, VMS is one of five instruments aboard the DAVINCI descent probe.

Newswise: Probing How Microbiomes Affect Our Health
Released: 9-Nov-2021 5:05 PM EST
Probing How Microbiomes Affect Our Health
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Customized molecular tools identify specific microbial functions that are key to healthy people and environments.

Newswise: Neutrons take a deep dive into water networks surrounding DNA
Released: 8-Nov-2021 11:15 AM EST
Neutrons take a deep dive into water networks surrounding DNA
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Using neutron experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research team led by Vanderbilt University successfully captured the most detailed view to date of water’s hydrogen bonding patterns around DNA, opening new possibilities for studying how water impacts DNA function.

Newswise: Converting Methane to Methanol -- With and Without Water
Released: 8-Nov-2021 10:45 AM EST
Converting Methane to Methanol -- With and Without Water
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY -- Chemists have been searching for efficient catalysts to convert methane -- a major component of abundant natural gas -- into methanol, an easily transported liquid fuel and building block for making other valuable chemicals. Adding water to the reaction can address certain challenges, but it also complicates the process.

Newswise: Researchers Develop CRISPR-based Rapid Diagnostic Tool for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 5-Nov-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers Develop CRISPR-based Rapid Diagnostic Tool for SARS-CoV-2
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego scientists have created a new technology that rapidly detects the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The new SENSR was developed using CRISPR gene-editing technology as a rapid diagnostic that could eventually be used in homes, airports and other locations.

Newswise: Sweat-collecting patch inspired by cactus spines
Released: 4-Nov-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Sweat-collecting patch inspired by cactus spines
POHANG UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (POSTECH)

A sweat-collecting patch has been developed using the principle based on how the cactus spines attract water.

4-Nov-2021 9:20 AM EDT
Cutting ammonia emissions is a cost-effective way to prevent air pollution deaths
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Tackling pollution from the emission of nitrogen compounds, particularly ammonia, could reduce many of the 23.3 million years of life that were lost prematurely across the world in 2013 due to nitrogen-related air pollution.

Newswise: Modeling Water-cleansing Wetlands in Extreme Weather
Released: 3-Nov-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Modeling Water-cleansing Wetlands in Extreme Weather
Georgia Institute of Technology

Wetlands are natural climate change buffers since they act as carbon “sinks." Better understanding how wetland sediments work could inform how they will function with more frequent rainstorms. Georgia Tech will develop a new model to predict where and when sediment disruptions are most likely to occur.

29-Oct-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Lithium imaging method could shine new light on bipolar disorder, treatment
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS Central Science developed a method for imaging lithium in living cells, allowing them to discover that neurons from bipolar disorder patients accumulate higher levels of lithium than healthy controls.

1-Nov-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Using microbes to make carbon-neutral fuel
Washington University in St. Louis

A team of biologists and engineers modified a microbe so that it can produce a biofuel using only three renewable and naturally abundant source ingredients: carbon dioxide, solar panel-generated electricity and light.

Released: 1-Nov-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Association for Molecular Pathology Announces 2021 Award Recipients
Association for Molecular Pathology

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, molecular diagnostics professional society, today announced the recipients of this year’s Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and Meritorious Service Award.

Released: 1-Nov-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Chemicals found in everyday products found to be harmful to fertility
University at Albany, State University of New York

Three studies found that a group of chemicals found in many plastic products are harmful to women who are pregnant and to couples planning a pregnancy – yet the products are often not on the list of things to be avoided.

Newswise: Story tips: Predicting water quality, stronger & ‘stretchier’ alloys, RAPID reinforcement and mountainous water towers
Released: 1-Nov-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Story tips: Predicting water quality, stronger & ‘stretchier’ alloys, RAPID reinforcement and mountainous water towers
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Predicting water quality, stronger & ‘stretchier’ alloys, RAPID reinforcement and mountainous water towers

Newswise: Can Proteins Bind Based Only on Their Shapes?
Released: 29-Oct-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Can Proteins Bind Based Only on Their Shapes?
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Proteins bind together through a complex mix of chemical interactions. What if some proteins bind due to their shapes, a much simpler process? Researchers used the Summit supercomputer to model a type of interaction that requires proteins to chemically “fit” precisely. The team found that among a sample of 46 protein pairs that bind to one another, 6 often assembled based on their shapes.

Newswise:Video Embedded energy-secretary-washington-governor-dedicate-energy-sciences-center-at-pnnl
VIDEO
Released: 29-Oct-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Energy Secretary, Washington Governor Dedicate Energy Sciences Center at PNNL
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Fundamental research conducted at the $90-million research facility will help the nation meet its clean energy goals.

Newswise:Video Embedded imaging-the-chemical-fingerprints-of-molecules
VIDEO
Released: 29-Oct-2021 4:10 AM EDT
Imaging the Chemical Fingerprints of Molecules
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Experiment, theory, and simulation show basic chemical properties are imprinted in atomic force microscope images and may help ID unknown molecules.

Newswise: Heatwaves like ‘the Blob’ could decrease role of ocean as carbon sink
Released: 28-Oct-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Heatwaves like ‘the Blob’ could decrease role of ocean as carbon sink
University of British Columbia

Researchers have found the two-year heatwave known as ‘the Blob’ may have temporarily dampened the Pacific’s ‘biological pump,’ which shuttles carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea where it can be stored for millennia.

Released: 28-Oct-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Scientists find strange black ​‘superionic ice’ that could exist inside other planets
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists have discovered a way to recreate the ice that exists inside planets like Neptune and Uranus, ice which forms at extremely high temperatures and pressures.

Released: 28-Oct-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Researchers film fundamental life process
University of Bonn

All proteins in a cell are assembled by complicated molecular machines.

Newswise: Not so Basic: Advances in pH and Phosphate Monitoring Enhance Safety in Nuclear Fuel Recycling
Released: 28-Oct-2021 3:50 AM EDT
Not so Basic: Advances in pH and Phosphate Monitoring Enhance Safety in Nuclear Fuel Recycling
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Two PNNL interns are behind recent innovation in real-time testing and continuous monitoring for pH and the concentration of chemicals of interest in chemical solutions; outcomes have applicability not only to nuclear, but to industries.

Released: 27-Oct-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Wayne State receives $3.1 million grant to seek alternative sources of rare earth elements
Wayne State University Division of Research

A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Wayne State University have been awarded a $3.1 million grant from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ERDC program to seek alternative sources of rare earth elements critical to advanced military and consumer technologies.


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