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Released: 28-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST
Kids eat more calories in post-game snacks than they burn during the game
Brigham Young University

Almost every parent knows the drill: When it's your turn, you bring Capri Suns and Rice Krispies Treats to your child's soccer game as a post-game snack.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-results-will-inform-immunization-programs-globally
VIDEO
22-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Study results will inform immunization programs globally
University of Adelaide

The results of the B Part of It study – the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted – are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise: Parent Confidence Is Key to Keeping Kids From Unhealthy Foods
Released: 20-Jan-2020 11:05 PM EST
Parent Confidence Is Key to Keeping Kids From Unhealthy Foods
University of South Australia

As the countdown to a new school year begins, many parents will soon find themselves facing the often-arduous task of filling the school lunchbox which, despite the best of intentions, often ends up containing more junk food than nutrition. Cutting kids’ consumption of unhealthy food is the focus on a new study by the University of South Australia and Flinders University, where lead researcher and PhD candidate Brittany Johnson says there is clear connection between parents’ motivations, and their children’s intake of unhealthy foods.

Newswise: Most Youths Surviving Opioid Overdose Not Getting Timely Treatment to Avoid Recurrence
Released: 16-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Most Youths Surviving Opioid Overdose Not Getting Timely Treatment to Avoid Recurrence
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A study of more than 4 million Medicaid claims records during a recent seven-year period concludes that less than a third of the nearly 3,800 U.S. adolescents and young adults who experienced a nonfatal opioid overdose got timely (within 30 days) follow-up addiction treatment to curb or prevent future misuse and reduce the risk of a second overdose.

Released: 20-Dec-2019 11:05 AM EST
Rise in serious harm to children caused by powerful painkillers, says study
Taylor & Francis

The proportion of high-strength painkiller poisonings among children which result in emergency hospital admissions has increased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Toxicology.

Released: 19-Dec-2019 4:05 PM EST
Number of Youth Who Start Vaping at 14 or Before Has Tripled
University of Michigan

The number of e-cigarette users who began vaping at age 14 or younger has more than tripled in the last five years, say University of Michigan researchers.

Newswise: The rare genetic disorder identified in only three people worldwide
Released: 15-Dec-2019 5:05 PM EST
The rare genetic disorder identified in only three people worldwide
University of South Australia

An extremely rare genetic disease that causes severe degeneration in infants has been identified for the first time.

Newswise: Do summer holidays undo the good work of school?
Released: 11-Dec-2019 7:05 PM EST
Do summer holidays undo the good work of school?
University of South Australia

As thousands of Aussie kids start summer holidays this week, there’s no doubt parents will see an increase in kids’ screen time, snack time and general relaxation. After a busy school year, it’s well-deserved, but could this change in activity have an adverse impact on their health?

Newswise: How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5M project
Released: 11-Dec-2019 8:15 AM EST
How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5M project
University of Warwick

The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease

Newswise: Fetal heart test may have predictive value for kids’ health
Released: 6-Dec-2019 3:20 AM EST
Fetal heart test may have predictive value for kids’ health
University of Washington School of Medicine

A low-oxygen environment in the womb may foretell which children should be followed closely, study indicates.

Newswise: Autism Study Tracks Musical Rhythm as Possible Treatment
Released: 21-Nov-2019 10:05 AM EST
Autism Study Tracks Musical Rhythm as Possible Treatment
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Researchers from the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center and the Marcus Autism Center at Emory University School of Medicine are partnering to study musical rhythm synchronization as a part of social development and how it’s disrupted in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in hopes of developing music interventions for improving social communication.

Released: 20-Nov-2019 8:35 AM EST
Parents matter – protecting kids from risky drinking
Research Society on Alcoholism

Many parents permit their adolescent children to drink alcohol, believing this helps teach them responsible use and avoids the appeal of ‘forbidden fruit’.

Released: 14-Nov-2019 12:00 AM EST
Unhealthy habits can start young: infants, toddlers and added sugars
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that nearly two-thirds of infants (61 percent) and almost all toddlers (98 percent) consumed added sugars in their average daily diets, primarily in the form of flavored yogurts (infants) and fruit drinks (toddlers).

Newswise: Young mums more likely to have kids with ADHD
Released: 24-Oct-2019 4:30 AM EDT
Young mums more likely to have kids with ADHD
University of South Australia

Young mothers have a greater chance of having a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) according to new research from the University of South Australia. Exploring the genetic relationship between female reproductive traits and key psychiatric disorders, it found that the genetic risk of ADHD in children was strongly associated with early maternal age at first birth, particular for women younger than 20.

Newswise: Parents of adults with epilepsy: Caregiving without a net
Released: 21-Oct-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Parents of adults with epilepsy: Caregiving without a net
International League Against Epilepsy

When an adult child is diagnosed with epilepsy, their parents face a wide array of social, emotional and financial issues, often with very little support. Striking a balance between caring for their child and allowing independence can be difficult and frustrating.

Newswise: Off a Cliff, Without a Parachute: Parents Left in the Cold When It Comes to Kids with Autism
20-Oct-2019 1:00 AM EDT
Off a Cliff, Without a Parachute: Parents Left in the Cold When It Comes to Kids with Autism
University of South Australia

First-line health professionals must vastly improve their communication and engagement with parents if they are to help address the growing prevalence of autism among children, say researchers from the University of South Australia.

Released: 16-Oct-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Deaf Infants’ Gaze Behavior More Advanced Than That of Hearing Infants
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult’s gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences.

13-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Researchers Discover Potential Therapy to Treat Detrimental Effects of Marijuana in Pre-Adolescent Individuals Exposed to THC in Womb
University of Maryland Medical Center

A University of Maryland School of Medicine study using a preclinical animal model suggests that prenatal exposure to THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, makes the brain’s dopamine neurons (an integral component of the reward system) hyperactive and increases sensitivity to the behavioral effects of THC during pre-adolescence.

Newswise: Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
Released: 14-Oct-2019 3:05 AM EDT
Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
University of Adelaide

New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever.

Released: 9-Oct-2019 6:00 AM EDT
Ethnically Diverse Mothers, Children Living in Poverty at Risk for Sleep Problems
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Researchers said strategies to reduce stress, electronic device and increased daily exercise may improve mothers’ sleep, while providing them with information about healthy sleep requirements, such as regular and early structured bedtimes, may improve sleep for their children.

Released: 25-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Teens Sleep 43 More Minutes Per Night After Combo of Two Treatments
Stanford University

Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown.

Newswise: Racism a Factor in Asthma Control for Young African American Children
12-Sep-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Racism a Factor in Asthma Control for Young African American Children
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows an association between African American parents/guardians who have experienced the chronic stress associated with exposure to racism and poor asthma control in their young children.

Released: 16-Sep-2019 12:00 PM EDT
Female Athletes Seek Specialty Care for Concussion Later than Males, Potentially Contributing to Longer Recovery
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Female athletes seek specialty medical treatment later than male athletes for sports-related concussions (SRC), and this delay may cause them to experience more symptoms and longer recoveries. The study raises the question of whether, in youth and high school sports, inequities in medical and athletic trainer coverage on the sidelines are contributing to delayed identification and specialized treatment of concussion for female athletes, leading to more symptoms and longer recovery trajectories.

Newswise: Two Studies Show Promise, Safety of Proton Therapy in the Brain in Children with Cancer
11-Sep-2019 9:30 AM EDT
Two Studies Show Promise, Safety of Proton Therapy in the Brain in Children with Cancer
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

From improving outcomes in children with brain cancer to lowering the risk of damage to the brainstem in children with central nervous system tumors, a pair of new studies published today add to the growing body of research showing the potential benefits of proton therapy.

Released: 9-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Children of anxious mothers twice as likely to have hyperactivity in adolescence
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

A large study has shown that children of mothers who are anxious during pregnancy and in the first few years of the child's life have twice the risk of having hyperactivity symptoms at age 16. This work is being presented for the first time at the ECNP Congress in Copenhagen.

3-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Sound Deprivation in One Ear Leads to Speech Recognition Difficulties
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to a new study led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear.

Released: 5-Sep-2019 12:20 PM EDT
Fix and prevent health disparities in children by supporting mom, and dad
Arizona State University (ASU)

According to the recent National Academies report on health disparities in children, one of the most important factors in preventing and addressing disparities is the well-being of the child’s primary caregiver. This finding is based on decades of developmental psychology research from Arizona State University scientists and others. When the primary caregiver is supported, the caregiver-child attachment can buffer against adversities like poverty, trauma and chronic stress.

Released: 4-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Autism Study Stresses Importance of Communicating with All Infants
University of Texas at Dallas

A new study from a UT Dallas assistant professor affiliated with the Infant Brain Imaging Study network that included infants later diagnosed with autism suggests that all children benefit from exposure to rich speech environments from their caregivers.

30-Aug-2019 11:30 AM EDT
New Peanut Allergy Treatment Shows Effectiveness and Safety
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) trial participants tolerated substantially more peanut protein than is common through accidental exposure. UNC School of Medicine researchers say SLIT (a tiny bit of liquid under the tongue) provides a good cushion of protection and a strong safety signal.

Newswise: Multimillion-Dollar Grant Funds New Vaccine Effort to Prevent Strep Throat Infections
Released: 3-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Multimillion-Dollar Grant Funds New Vaccine Effort to Prevent Strep Throat Infections
University of California San Diego Health

CARB-X, an international funder of efforts to fight antimicrobial resistance, is awarding up to $15 million to develop a strep throat vaccine based on original research at UC San Diego.

Newswise: Cracking the Code of a Brain Cancer That Keeps Coming Back
26-Aug-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Cracking the Code of a Brain Cancer That Keeps Coming Back
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Researchers used a powerful new computer-assisted technology called single-cell transcriptomics that measures thousands of individual cells simultaneously to map cell types and molecular cascades that drive the growth of SHH-medulloblastoma. In a study published Aug. 29 by the journal Cancer Cell

Newswise: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Welcomes New Chief of Infectious Diseases
Released: 28-Aug-2019 10:00 AM EDT
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Welcomes New Chief of Infectious Diseases
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) announces the selection of physician-scientist Audrey R. Odom John, MD, PhD, renowned as both a malaria researcher and an outstanding clinician, as its new chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases.

21-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
What we don’t know about prenatal opioid exposure
University of Utah

“Will the baby be OK?” In cases of prenatal opioid exposure, the answer is unclear. As part of a National Institutes of Health initiative to study the effects of a child’s environment on his or her life outcomes, University of Utah developmental psychologist Elisabeth Conradt and her colleagues collected and reviewed 52 publications to identify what’s known so far about how prenatal opioid exposure affects childhood outcomes and development.

Released: 27-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Study: Helping Some Infants with Fevers Avoid Painful Tests in the ER
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Long hospital stays and invasive medical tests help identify serious bacterial infections in infants, but a University of Michigan expert says there may be a more efficient, less painful way to make a diagnosis.

Newswise: First-of-its-kind study shows link between unhealthy diet and symptoms of depression in youth
Released: 27-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
First-of-its-kind study shows link between unhealthy diet and symptoms of depression in youth
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Diet matters when it comes to depression. Teens who have a high-sodium, low-potassium diet are at a higher risk of depression.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Don’t wait to follow up on eye doctor recommendations
Released: 21-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
The Medical Minute: Don’t wait to follow up on eye doctor recommendations
Penn State Health

Regular vision screenings are part of all well-child checks at Penn State Health – but sometimes, caring for a child’s eyes requires additional steps.

Released: 13-Aug-2019 11:40 AM EDT
Tips for teens, parents on staying safe during summer months and activities
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Pediatricians share their summer and back-to-school safety tips for parents and teens.

Newswise: Look, Then Lock! Children Continue to Die Unattended in Cars
Released: 12-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Look, Then Lock! Children Continue to Die Unattended in Cars
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

According to the National Safety Council (NSC), on average, there are more than three dozen children dying in parked cars every year. In 2018, that number climbed to 52. Dr. Ernest G. Leva of Rutgers Health suggests creating new routines and reminders to help avoid these tragedies.

Newswise: Seven Myths About Children’s Eyes
Released: 5-Aug-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Seven Myths About Children’s Eyes
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

There are a lot of myths and misinformation out there about children’s eye health. The American Academy of Ophthalmology debunks seven common myths about children’s eye health.

Newswise: For malnourished children, new therapeutic food boosts gut microbes, healthy development
8-Jul-2019 6:05 PM EDT
For malnourished children, new therapeutic food boosts gut microbes, healthy development
Washington University in St. Louis

A new type of therapeutic food, specifically designed to repair the gut microbiomes of malnourished children, is superior to standard therapy in an initial clinical trial conducted in Bangladesh.

Newswise: Researchers awarded grant to study obesity in children with spina bifida
Released: 10-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Researchers awarded grant to study obesity in children with spina bifida
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Health providers would like to give better diet guidelines to parents of children with spina bifida but exact measurements of the children's body composition are hard to obtain. This group aims develop an easy method of gathering body fat information with the ultimate goal of preventing obesity.

Newswise:Video Embedded improving-family-and-community-health-through-getting-kids-cooking
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Improving family and community health through getting kids cooking
Monday Campaigns

When kids help prepare meals, they eat healthier, learn important life skills and perform better in school. The Kids Cook Monday is an non-profit initiative from the Monday Campaigns that encourages families to make and eat meals together. Learn more about how to bring this program to your community through this video.

Newswise: Eight UVA Children’s Hospital Specialties Nationally Ranked by U.S. News & World Report
Released: 18-Jun-2019 8:30 AM EDT
Eight UVA Children’s Hospital Specialties Nationally Ranked by U.S. News & World Report
University of Virginia Health System

Eight University of Virginia Children’s Hospital specialties earned a top-50 national ranking in U.S. News & World Report’s 2019-2020 “Best Children’s Hospitals” guide.

Released: 12-Jun-2019 9:50 AM EDT
Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience bullying than children without ASD and this bullying gets worse with age, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 31-May-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Classification System Based on Co-Occurring Conditions May Provide Insight Into Autism
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

According to research published today in Autism Research, creating a classification system for ASD based on co-occurring conditions could provide useful insights into the underlying mechanics of ASD and these conditions.

Newswise: Scientists Bioengineer Human Liver Disease in the Lab to Find New Treatments
23-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists Bioengineer Human Liver Disease in the Lab to Find New Treatments
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists successfully bioengineered human liver organoids that faithfully mimic key features of fatal liver disease in the laboratory. This allowed them to uncover underlying disease biology in the organoids and test a potential therapy that in preclinical lab tests reversed an often-fatal childhood condition called Wolman disease.

Released: 21-May-2019 7:30 AM EDT
Specialty Dental Association Teams Up with State Rep. to Proclaim May as Save Your Tooth Month in Illinois
American Association of Endodontists (AAE)

To help people appreciate their natural teeth, the American Association of Endodontists (AAE) teamed up with Illinois state Rep. Sam Yingling, D-Grayslake, to proclaim the month of May as Save Your Tooth Month.

Newswise: Children and Teens Who Drink Low-Calorie Sweetened Beverages Do Not Save Calories Compared to Those Who Drink Sugary Drinks
Released: 2-May-2019 4:40 PM EDT
Children and Teens Who Drink Low-Calorie Sweetened Beverages Do Not Save Calories Compared to Those Who Drink Sugary Drinks
George Washington University

U.S. children and teens who consumed low-calorie or zero-calorie sweetened beverages took in about 200 extra calories on a given day compared to those who drank water, and they took in about the same number of calories as youth who consumed sugary beverages, according to a study published today.

Newswise: Genetic Variations in a Fourth Gene Linked to Elevated Leukemia Risk in Hispanic Children
Released: 14-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
Genetic Variations in a Fourth Gene Linked to Elevated Leukemia Risk in Hispanic Children
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have completed one of the largest studies yet designed to advance understanding of why Hispanic children are more likely to develop leukemia and less likely to survive

Newswise: Parents’ brain activity ‘echoes’ their infant’s brain activity when they play together
Released: 13-Dec-2018 3:25 PM EST
Parents’ brain activity ‘echoes’ their infant’s brain activity when they play together
PLOS

When infants are playing with objects, their early attempts to pay attention to things are accompanied by bursts of high-frequency activity in their brain. But what happens when parents play together with them? New research, publishing December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues, shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, their own brains show similar bursts of high-frequency activity. Intriguingly, these bursts of activity are linked to their baby’s attention patterns and not their own.


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