Focus: Coronavirus Channel Featured Story 2

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Released: 13-May-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Dental procedures during pandemic are no riskier than a drink of water
Ohio State University

A new study’s findings dispel the misconception that patients and providers are at high risk of catching COVID-19 at the dentist’s office.

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Released: 26-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Nanobodies inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute

Australian researchers have identified neutralising nanobodies that block the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering cells in preclinical models.

Newswise: Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
Released: 22-Apr-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
University of Washington School of Medicine

In a worldwide study of 2,100 pregnant women, those who contracted COVID-19 during pregnancy were 20 times more likely to die than those who did not contract the virus.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 4:15 PM EDT
First Images of Cells Exposed to Covid 19 Vaccine Reveal Native Like Coronavirus Spikes
University of Southampton

New research has for the first time compared images of the protein spikes that develop on the surface of cells exposed to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to the protein spike of the SARS-CoV-19 coronavirus.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Study Identifies Risk Factors for COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Mortality Among U.S. Nursing Home Residents
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Risks of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection for long-stay nursing home residents were mainly dependent on factors in their nursing homes and surrounding communities.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Cancer Research Institute and RevImmune Announce Dosing of First Patient in New Phase 2 Study Assessing Therapeutic Benefit of Interleukin-7 in Patients with Cancer and COVID-19
Cancer Research Institute and RevImmune

New immunotherapy approach to treating cancer patients with COVID-19 aims to reduce risk of severe COVID-19 symptoms by reinvigorating patients' cellular immune responses

Released: 26-Mar-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Study Shows Face Masks Strongly Associated With Reducing Healthcare Workers’ Risk of Acquiring COVID-19
Henry Ford Health System

A study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine from researchers at Henry Ford Health System has found that Henry Ford's early implementation of a universal mask policy in the COVID-19 pandemic was strongly associated with reducing the risk of healthcare workers at Henry Ford acquiring COVID-19.

Released: 24-Mar-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Three Common Antiviral Drugs Potentially Effective Against COVID-19
North Carolina State University

Three commonly used antiviral and antimalarial drugs are effective in vitro at preventing replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Flu shot associated with fewer, less severe COVID cases
Released: 23-Mar-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Flu shot associated with fewer, less severe COVID cases
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

People who received a flu shot last flu season were significantly less likely to test positive for a COVID-19 infection when the pandemic hit, according to a new study. And those who did test positive for COVID-19 had fewer complications if they received their flu shot.

17-Mar-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Study suggests high vitamin D levels may protect against COVID-19, especially for Black people
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new research study at the University of Chicago Medicine has found that when it comes to COVID-19, having vitamin D levels above those traditionally considered sufficient may lower the risk of infection, especially for Black people.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 12:15 PM EDT
New Study Shows How Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 Allow the Virus to Evade Immune System Defenses
Harvard Medical School

Research reveals how mutated SARS-CoV-2 evades immune system defenses In lab-dish experiments, the mutant virus escaped antibodies from the plasma of COVID-19 survivors as well as pharmaceutical-grade antibodies Mutations arose in an immunocompromised patient with chronic SARS-CoV-2 infection Patient-derived virus harbored structural changes now seen cropping up independently in samples across the globe Findings underscore the need for better genomic surveillance to keep track of emerging variants Results highlight importance of therapies aimed at multiple targets on SARS-CoV-2 to minimize risk of resistance

Newswise: Leprosy drug holds promise as at-home treatment for COVID-19
Released: 16-Mar-2021 6:00 AM EDT
Leprosy drug holds promise as at-home treatment for COVID-19
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

A Nature study shows that the leprosy drug clofazimine, which is FDA approved and on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, exhibits potent antiviral activities against SARS-CoV-2 and prevents the exaggerated inflammatory response associated with severe COVID-19. Based on these findings, a Phase 2 study evaluating clofazimine as an at-home treatment for COVID-19 could begin immediately.

Released: 10-Mar-2021 5:00 PM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Find that a Second Shot of COVID-19 Vaccine May Not be Necessary in Previously Infected Individuals
Mount Sinai Health System

A single shot of one of the currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines may be sufficient to provide immunity to individuals who have previously been infected by the virus, thus eliminating the need for a second dose and helping to stretch severely limited vaccine supplies, a study from Mount Sinai has found

Released: 2-Mar-2021 3:05 PM EST
Houston Methodist finds multiple cases of significant coronavirus mutations, including Brazil strain
Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist has sequenced more than 20,000 of Houston’s coronavirus genomes since the start of the pandemic and leads the SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing efforts in the U.S. In the most recent batches of genomes, the U.K., South Africa, Brazil, California and New York variants were detected.

Released: 9-Feb-2021 11:30 AM EST
In Lab, Broad Spectrum Antiviral Proves Highly Effective at Preventing, Treating COVID-19
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Publishing their work in Nature, UNC-Chapel Hill scientists showed how the orally administered experimental drug EIDD-2801 halts SARS-CoV-2 replication and prevents infection of human cells in a new in vivo research model containing human lung tissue. Separate phase 2 and 3 clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate EIDD-2801 safety in humans and its effect on viral shedding in COVID-19 patients.

Newswise: Case Western Reserve University-Led Team Finds That People with Dementia at Higher Risk for COVID-19
28-Jan-2021 9:25 AM EST
Case Western Reserve University-Led Team Finds That People with Dementia at Higher Risk for COVID-19
Case Western Reserve University

A study led by Case Western Reserve University researchers found that patients with dementia were at a significantly increased risk for COVID-19—and the risk was higher still for African Americans with dementia.

Newswise: How SARS-CoV-2 Mutates to Escape Antibody Binding
Released: 3-Feb-2021 2:00 PM EST
How SARS-CoV-2 Mutates to Escape Antibody Binding
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A scientific detective story starting with a single patient in Pittsburgh unearths how the SARS-CoV-2 virus mutates to create new variants, including the UK strain B.1.1.7, and escapes neutralizing antibodies.

25-Jan-2021 7:00 PM EST
Schizophrenia Second Only To Age as Greatest Risk Factor for COVID-19 Death
NYU Langone Health

People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows. Their higher risk, the investigators say, cannot be explained by other factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, and smoking.

Newswise: Microwaves Used to Deactivate Coronavirus, Flu, Other Aerosolized Viruses
22-Jan-2021 2:25 PM EST
Microwaves Used to Deactivate Coronavirus, Flu, Other Aerosolized Viruses
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

As the pandemic continues, scientists are increasingly focused on developing methods to assist in decontaminating surfaces and spaces. In Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers report on experimental tools capable of presenting electromagnetic waves to an aerosol mixture with the capability to vary power, energy, and frequency of the electromagnetic exposure. The researchers seek to better characterize the threshold levels of microwave energy needed to inactivate aerosolized viral particles and reduce their ability to spread infection.

Newswise:Video Embedded air-purifiers-may-do-more-harm-than-good-in-confined-spaces-with-airborne-viruses
VIDEO
25-Jan-2021 10:00 AM EST
Air Purifiers May Do More Harm Than Good in Confined Spaces with Airborne Viruses
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

The positions of air inlets and outlets in confined spaces, such as elevators, greatly affect airborne virus transmission. In Physics of Fluids, researchers show air purifiers may actually increase the spread. They use ultraviolet radiation to kill viruses and other microbes, but they also circulate air, sucking it in and exhausting cleaned air. This adds to overall circulation.

Newswise: NAU-TGen study results show COVID-19 virus triggers antibodies from previous coronavirus infections
Released: 19-Jan-2021 11:30 AM EST
NAU-TGen study results show COVID-19 virus triggers antibodies from previous coronavirus infections
Northern Arizona University

A collaborative study shows COVID-19 virus triggers antibodies from previous coronavirus infections, such as the common cold. It may also explain how previous exposure could partially account for differences in severity between old vs. young patients

Newswise: Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Released: 12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics to compare the rate of cardiovascular-related deaths before and after the onset of the pandemic in the United States, relative to the same periods in the prior year.

Newswise: Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
Released: 17-Dec-2020 3:00 PM EST
Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
University of Washington School of Medicine

The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a study published Dec.16 in Nature Neuroscience, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. This strongly suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, can enter the brain. The spike protein, often called the S1 protein, dictates which cells the virus can enter. Usually, the virus does the same thing as its binding protein, said lead author William A. Banks, a professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine and a Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Healthcare System physician and researcher. Banks said binding proteins like S1 usually by themselves cause damage as they detach from the virus and cause inflammation.

Newswise: Some States May Lack Facilities for Administering COVID-19 Vaccine to Residents
Released: 16-Dec-2020 4:45 PM EST
Some States May Lack Facilities for Administering COVID-19 Vaccine to Residents
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

As the biggest vaccination effort in U.S. history gets underway, several states may not have enough facilities in some areas to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to all residents who want it, according to a new analysis from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and the nonprofit West Health.

Newswise: Fast Walking in Narrow Corridors Can Increase COVID-19 Transmission Risk
9-Dec-2020 10:15 AM EST
Fast Walking in Narrow Corridors Can Increase COVID-19 Transmission Risk
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Simulations have been used to predict droplet dispersal patterns in situations where COVID-19 might be spread and results in Physics of Fluids show the importance of the space shape in modeling how droplets move. The simulations are used to determine flow patterns behind a walking individual in spaces of different shape. The results reveal a higher transmission risk for children in some instances, such as behind quickly moving people in a long narrow hallway.

Released: 14-Dec-2020 12:45 PM EST
First doses of COVID-19 vaccine in Canada given by University Health Network
University Health Network (UHN)

University Health Network (UHN) today gave the first COVID-19 vaccine in Canada. This landmark event signals a potential turning point in the pandemic and underlines the value of science and worldwide cooperation.

Released: 10-Dec-2020 9:00 AM EST
Studies Reveal Potential Weaknesses in SARS-CoV-2 Infection
NYU Langone Health

A single protein that appears necessary for the COVID-19 virus to reproduce and spread to other cells is a potential weakness that could be targeted by future therapies.

Newswise: This Anti-COVID Mask Breaks the Mold
Released: 9-Dec-2020 7:55 AM EST
This Anti-COVID Mask Breaks the Mold
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

To address PPE shortages during the pandemic, scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley are developing a rechargeable, reusable, anti-COVID N95 mask and a 3D-printable silicon-cast mask mold.

Newswise: Over half of adults over 50 say they’ll get vaccinated against COVID-19, but many will want to wait, poll finds
20-Nov-2020 8:50 AM EST
Over half of adults over 50 say they’ll get vaccinated against COVID-19, but many will want to wait, poll finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new poll of adults ages 50 to 80 suggests that achieving the widespread vaccination against COVID-19 needed to protect this high-risk group and end the pandemic will be an uphill climb, and require clear, transparent communication from health providers and others.

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 Transmission Model Offers Decision-Making Pathways for Safe School Opening
Released: 20-Nov-2020 11:50 AM EST
SARS-CoV-2 Transmission Model Offers Decision-Making Pathways for Safe School Opening
University of Vermont

Can schools safely remain open or reopen during periods of significant community spread of COVID-19? According to predictions from a model of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the school setting, yes – if appropriate precautions are followed both in school and in the community.

Newswise: Study Finds Low Risk Of Pregnancy Complications From COVID-19
Released: 19-Nov-2020 11:20 AM EST
Study Finds Low Risk Of Pregnancy Complications From COVID-19
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Nov. 19, 2020 – Pregnant women who test positive for COVID-19 and their newborn babies have a low risk of developing severe symptoms, according to a new study from UT Southwestern.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Promising New Compounds to Potentially Treat Novel Coronaviruses
Released: 13-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
Researchers Identify Promising New Compounds to Potentially Treat Novel Coronaviruses
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered new drug compounds to potentially treat the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. This finding could lead to the development of new broad-spectrum antiviral drugs that target viruses such as influenza, Ebola and coronaviruses.

Newswise: COVID-19 Immunity May Last Six Months or More
Released: 11-Nov-2020 4:10 PM EST
COVID-19 Immunity May Last Six Months or More
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

People who have recovered from coronavirus can make potent antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 that evolve in the months after infection. These antibodies may be evolving in response to residual viral antigen hidden in the gut.

Newswise: Infection by Confection: COVID-19 and the Risk of Trick-or-Treating
Released: 30-Oct-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Infection by Confection: COVID-19 and the Risk of Trick-or-Treating
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers determined that COVID-19 transmission risk via Halloween candies is low, even when they are handled by infected people, but handwashing and disinfecting collected sweets reduces risk even further.

Newswise: Remdesivir for COVID-19: FDA Approved but Still Unproven
Released: 29-Oct-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Remdesivir for COVID-19: FDA Approved but Still Unproven
Florida Atlantic University

In a review of evidence from the most reliable data from randomized trials to find likely small-to-moderate effects of remdesivir, researchers say that totality of evidence compiled before the WHO trial results justifies compassionate use of remdesivir for severely ill patients. A smaller trial in China showed significantly decreased mean recovery time but no suggestion of a mortality benefit. ACTT-1 found the same mean recovery time and a suggestion of a mortality benefit that did not achieve statistical significance.

Newswise: COVID-19: Dexamethasone discovery carries treatment implications
Released: 27-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT
COVID-19: Dexamethasone discovery carries treatment implications
University of Virginia Health System

A new discovery about how the body transports dexamethasone, a drug that can increase the survival chances of patients with severe COVID-19, suggests diabetes and other factors may reduce its potentially lifesaving effect.

Released: 26-Oct-2020 7:00 AM EDT
New York City’s Coronavirus Outbreak Spread from More European Sources Than First Reported
NYU Langone Health

The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. A new analysis also shows that most of the spread was within the community, as opposed to coming from people who had traveled.

Newswise: New Landmark Study at UM School of Medicine Finds Aspirin Use Reduces Risk of Death in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
Released: 22-Oct-2020 2:40 PM EDT
New Landmark Study at UM School of Medicine Finds Aspirin Use Reduces Risk of Death in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
University of Maryland Medical Center

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease had a significantly lower risk of complications and death compared to those who were not taking aspirin, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Released: 20-Oct-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Nearly a Quarter of New York City Transit Workers Report Having Had COVID-19
New York University

A survey of New York City’s bus and subway workers finds that 24 percent report having contracted COVID-19 and 90 percent fear getting sick at work. The pilot study, conducted by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, in coordination with the Transport Workers Union (TWU) Local 100, helps document the toll the pandemic has taken on the physical and mental health of essential workers.

Released: 19-Oct-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Patients Who Had More Severe Covid-19 May Be the Best Donors for Convalescent Plasma Therapy
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Sex, age, and severity of disease may be useful in identifying COVID-19 survivors who are likely to have high levels of antibodies that can protect against the disease.

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Released: 19-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
CBD helps reduce lung damage from COVID by increasing levels of protective peptide
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University

One way CBD appears to reduce the "cytokine storm" that damages the lungs and kills many patients with COVID-19 is by enabling an increase in levels of a natural peptide called apelin, which is known to reduce inflammation and whose levels are dramatically reduced in the face of this storm.

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Released: 8-Oct-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Urban air pollution may make COVID-19 more severe for some
Cell Press

As the pandemic persists, COVID-19 has claimed more than 200,000 lives in the United States and damaged the public health system and economy.

Newswise: Questions abound regarding young athletes, heart disease and COVID-19
Released: 7-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Questions abound regarding young athletes, heart disease and COVID-19
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Reports that some young athletes testing positive for COVID-19 also had increased rates of heart swelling have concerned sports medicine physicians around the country, concerned about the possible impact of myocarditis, a potentially fatal heart condition.

Newswise: Factors Inherent to Obesity Could Increase Vulnerability to COVID-19
Released: 16-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Factors Inherent to Obesity Could Increase Vulnerability to COVID-19
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Sept. 15, 2020 – Conditions related to obesity, including inflammation and leaky gut, leave the lungs of obese patients more susceptible to COVID-19 and may explain why they are more likely to die from the disease, UTSW scientists say in a new article published online in eLife. They suggest that drugs used to lower inflammation in the lungs could prove beneficial to obese patients with the disease.

8-Sep-2020 5:25 PM EDT
COVID-19 may have been in L.A. as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers and colleagues who analyzed electronic health records found that there was a significant increase in patients with coughs and acute respiratory failure at UCLA Health hospitals and clinics beginning in late December 2019, suggesting that COVID-19 may have been circulating in the area months before the first definitive cases in the U.S. were identified. This sudden spike in patients with these symptoms, which continued through February 2020, represents an unexpected 50% increase in such cases when compared with the same time period in each of the previous five years.

Newswise: Asthma May Not Be a Significant Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19 or COVID-Related Intubation
Released: 31-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Asthma May Not Be a Significant Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19 or COVID-Related Intubation
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

A new research letter published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines whether asthma is a significant risk factor for developing COVID-19 that is severe enough to warrant hospitalization and intubation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals with asthma are at higher risk for hospitalization and other severe effects from COVID-19, similar to the elevated risk from such health conditions as obesity, hypertension and diabetes.

Newswise: Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
Released: 12-Aug-2020 6:30 PM EDT
Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
Houston Methodist

A preliminary analysis of an ongoing study of more than 300 COVID-19 patients treated with convalescent plasma therapy at Houston Methodist suggests the treatment is safe and effective. The results, published in The American Journal of Pathology, represent one of the first peer-reviewed publications in the country assessing efficacy of convalescent plasma and offer valuable scientific evidence that transfusing critically ill COVID-19 patients with high antibody plasma early in their illness reduced the mortality rate.

Newswise: Residents of some cities unwilling to comply with COVID-19 prevention behaviors
Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Residents of some cities unwilling to comply with COVID-19 prevention behaviors
Penn State College of Medicine

Several U.S. cities may be at increased risk of surges in COVID-19 cases as they reopen their economies because their residents are unwilling to follow practices that reduce the spread of the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Less ACE2, Better Immune Function May Protect Children from Severe COVID-19
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new perspective piece suggests differences in lung physiology and immune function as possible reasons why children are often spared from severe illness associated with SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

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Released: 11-May-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Imaging reveals bowel abnormalities in patients with COVID-19
Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)

Patients with COVID-19 can have bowel abnormalities, including ischemia, according to a new study published today in the journal Radiology.


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