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Newswise: Key Change in Genetics of SARS-CoV-2 Evolved to Counter Weakness Caused by the Virus’ Initial Mutation that Enabled Its Spread
Released: 12-Jan-2023 9:00 AM EST
Key Change in Genetics of SARS-CoV-2 Evolved to Counter Weakness Caused by the Virus’ Initial Mutation that Enabled Its Spread
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say their new studies suggest that the first pandemic-accelerating mutation in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, evolved as a way to correct vulnerabilities caused by the mutation that started the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

Newswise: COVID-19 vaccine’s effectiveness diminishes with age, research shows
Released: 29-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST
COVID-19 vaccine’s effectiveness diminishes with age, research shows
UT Southwestern Medical Center

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine limits transmission, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 even among patients infected by variants of the virus, but the effectiveness of antibodies it generates diminishes as patients get older, according to a study by UT Southwestern researchers.

Newswise: Investigating COVID-19 deaths for children and young people
2-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Investigating COVID-19 deaths for children and young people
PLOS

A new study conducted in England shows that the risk of death due to COVID-19 remains very low for children and young people, and most deaths occur in those with underlying health conditions. Marta Bertran of the UK Health Security Agency, London, and colleagues present these findings on November 8th in the open access journal PLOS Medicine.

Newswise: How a SARS-CoV-2 Virus Protein Damages the Heart
Released: 7-Nov-2022 7:05 PM EST
How a SARS-CoV-2 Virus Protein Damages the Heart
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) Center for Precision Disease Modeling identified how a specific protein in SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, damages heart tissue. They then used a drug to reverse the toxic effects of that protein on the heart.

Newswise: Treated or Not, COVID-19 Recurrence Seems Symptomatic for Some
Released: 31-Oct-2022 12:10 PM EDT
Treated or Not, COVID-19 Recurrence Seems Symptomatic for Some
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers and others report that more than one-third of the COVID-19 patients who did not receive any treatment experienced complete resolution of symptoms for at least two consecutive days, but then subsequently reported a return of symptoms.

Newswise: Penn State scientists one step closer to adaptation-proof COVID-19 vaccine
Released: 18-Oct-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Penn State scientists one step closer to adaptation-proof COVID-19 vaccine
Penn State College of Medicine

A vaccine that could protect against new variants of SARS-CoV-2 and also potentially protect against other coronaviruses is one step closer to reality thanks to College of Medicine researchers.

Released: 10-Oct-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Other SARS-CoV-2 Proteins are Important for Disease Severity, Aside from the Spike
University of Maryland School of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have identified how multiple genes of SARS-CoV-2 affect disease severity, which could lead to new ways in how we develop future vaccines or develop newer treatments. The genes control the immune system of the host, contributing to how fiercely the body responds to a COVID-19 infection.

7-Sep-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Vaccines dramatically reduce the risk of long-term effects of COVID-19
Bar-Ilan University

Being vaccinated with at least two doses of Pfizer vaccines dramatically reduces most of the long-term symptoms individuals reported months after contracting COVID-19, a new study shows.

Newswise: New Data Shows COVID-19 Vaccine Does Not Raise Stroke Risk
Released: 24-Aug-2022 5:00 PM EDT
New Data Shows COVID-19 Vaccine Does Not Raise Stroke Risk
Cedars-Sinai

Newly compiled data evaluated by researchers in the Department of Neurology and the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that COVID-19 vaccines do not raise stroke risk--but that severe COVID-19 infection does. Physician-scientists hope this growing body of evidence, highlighted today in an editorial in the peer-reviewed journal Neurology, will ease the minds of individuals still hesitant to be vaccinated.

Newswise: Reduced myocardial blood flow is new clue in how COVID-19 is impacting the heart
Released: 17-Aug-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Reduced myocardial blood flow is new clue in how COVID-19 is impacting the heart
Houston Methodist

Patients with prior COVID may be twice as likely to have unhealthy endothelial cells that line the inside of the heart and blood vessels, according to newly published research from Houston Methodist. This finding offers a new clue in understanding COVID-19’s impact on cardiovascular health.

Newswise: Coronavirus Jumped to Humans at Least Twice at Market in Wuhan, China
Released: 26-Jul-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Coronavirus Jumped to Humans at Least Twice at Market in Wuhan, China
UC San Diego Health

In a pair of related studies, UC San Diego researchers show that the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic was at a Chinese market and resulted from at least two instances of the SARS-CoV-2 virus jumping from live animal hosts to humans working or shopping there.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-trace-earliest-cases-of-covid-19-to-market-in-wuhan-china
VIDEO
26-Jul-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Trace Earliest Cases of COVID-19 to Market in Wuhan, China
University of Utah Health

An international team of 18 researchers have determined that the earliest cases of COVID-19 in humans arose at a wholesale fish market in Wuhan China in December, 2019. They linked these cases to bats, foxes and other live mammals infected with the virus sold in the market either for consumption as meat or for their fur.

20-Jul-2022 8:50 AM EDT
Pfizer-BioNTech and AstraZeneca vaccines offer high protection against severe COVID-19, 6 months after second doses, finds study of over 7 million adults
University of Bristol

Protection against severe COVID-19 by two doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines remained high up to six months after second doses, finds new research which analysed NHS health record data on over seven million adults. Reassuringly, the University of Bristol-led study published in The BMJ today [July 20], found protection in older adults aged over 65 years, and in clinically vulnerable adults.

Released: 8-Jul-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Mask Wearing Amplifies Harms of Smoking
European Society of Cardiology

Smoking traditional or non-combustible cigarettes while wearing a surgical mask results in a two-fold rise in exhaled carbon monoxide and impaired blood vessel function compared to non-mask periods.

Released: 24-Jun-2022 11:05 AM EDT
COVID-19 Vaccination in Pregnancy Helps Protect Infants from Needing Hospital Care for COVID-19
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

In a new study sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers provide additional evidence that COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy helps protect babies younger than 6 months from being hospitalized due to COVID-19. The risk of COVID-19 hospitalization among babies was reduced by about 80 percent during the Delta wave (July 1–December 18, 2021) and 40 percent during the Omicron wave (December 19–March 8, 2022).

Newswise: Exercise after flu shot, COVID-19 vaccine bumps up antibodies
Released: 11-Feb-2022 12:00 PM EST
Exercise after flu shot, COVID-19 vaccine bumps up antibodies
Iowa State University

Participants in the study who cycled on a stationary bike or took a brisk walk for an hour-and-a-half after getting a flu shot or COVID-19 jab produced more antibodies in the following four weeks compared to participants who sat or continued with their daily routine post-immunization.

Newswise: Current vaccines teach T cells to fight Omicron
Released: 24-Jan-2022 11:55 AM EST
Current vaccines teach T cells to fight Omicron
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that four COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, J&J/Janssen, and Novavax) prompt the body to make effective, long-lasting T cells against SARS-CoV-2. These T cells can recognize SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern, including Delta and Omicron.

Released: 12-Jan-2022 3:05 PM EST
International Study Identifies Predictors of Severe Outcomes in Children with COVID-19
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A new international study offers a clearer picture of the impact of COVID-19 infection and the risk of severe outcomes on young people around the world.

Newswise:Video Embedded weathering-the-omicron-surge-explaining-flurona
VIDEO
Released: 5-Jan-2022 3:30 PM EST
Weathering the Omicron Surge, Explaining "Flurona"
Cedars-Sinai

First on the list: Get vaccinated and get a booster shot if you qualify.

Newswise: A longer-lasting COVID vaccine? UCLA study points the way
Released: 10-Dec-2021 12:10 PM EST
A longer-lasting COVID vaccine? UCLA study points the way
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have identified rare, naturally occurring T cells that are capable of targeting a protein found in SARS-CoV-2 and a range of other coronaviruses.

11-Nov-2021 1:30 PM EST
Did the US COVID-19 Vaccine Strategy Work?
PLOS

The CDC’s vaccine prioritization strategy performed well compared to other approaches, though with some room for improvement

Released: 18-Oct-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Cancer Patients With Poor Antibody Response to COVID-19 Vaccines Also Lack Secondary Immune Response, Study Shows
Mount Sinai Health System

Patients with the blood cancer multiple myeloma often mount a poor antibody response to COVID-19 vaccines. Mount Sinai researchers have now discovered that these patients also have a weak response from a different part of the immune system, known as T cells. Their discovery was published in a research letter in Cancer Cell in October.

Newswise: covid-math-newsdesk.jpg
Released: 13-Oct-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Eliminate COVID-19? It’s Possible Based on New Mathematical Models
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers are the first to introduce a novel mathematical framework to study the interplay between infectious diseases, human behavior – specifically social distancing – and economic growth. They introduced two models: a coupled disease-human behavior model to study the impact of full social distancing, and a coupled disease-human behavior model with an economic component to study the interplay between infectious diseases, human response to disease control measures, and the associated economic impact. Results show that disease elimination might be possible with various scenarios.

Newswise: The Lancet: COVID-19 pandemic led to stark rise in depressive and anxiety disorders globally in 2020, with women and younger people most affected.
Released: 11-Oct-2021 3:45 PM EDT
The Lancet: COVID-19 pandemic led to stark rise in depressive and anxiety disorders globally in 2020, with women and younger people most affected.
Lancet

First global estimates of impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in 2020 suggests additional 53 million cases of major depressive disorder and 76 million cases of anxiety disorders were due to the pandemic.

Newswise: Denison_Mark003_edited-1.jpg
Released: 1-Oct-2021 4:45 PM EDT
VUMC research contributed to first COVID-19 pill now under review
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The drug, known as molnupiravir, was first shown to be efficacious against coronaviruses including the COVID-19 virus, SARS-CoV-2, by investigators in the lab of Mark Denison, MD, at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and their colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Newswise: adhikari-emilyv2.jpg
Released: 30-Sep-2021 4:45 PM EDT
COVID-19 Hospitalizations Increase Among Unvaccinated Pregnant Women
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Unvaccinated pregnant women are increasingly being hospitalized with COVID-19 during a nationwide surge of the Delta variant, according to research from UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Newswise: ecmomachine.jpg
29-Sep-2021 7:05 AM EDT
ECMO life support offers sickest COVID-19 patients a chance to survive, but a slimmer one than once thought
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The life-support system called ECMO can rescue COVID-19 patients from the brink of death, but not at the rates seen early in the pandemic, a new international study finds. Where once about 60% of such patients survived at least 90 days in spring 2020, by the end of the year it was just under half.

Newswise: COVID-19 transmission risks rise during labor with patients’ heavier breathing
Released: 14-Sep-2021 1:25 PM EDT
COVID-19 transmission risks rise during labor with patients’ heavier breathing
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Some medical procedures can put health care workers at higher risk for contracting COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases. With these high-risk procedures, it’s important that health care providers have access to personal protective equipment (PPE), including N95 masks. However, not all procedures that may seem high risk have that designation.

Released: 26-Aug-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Symptomatic COVID patients are more contagious
University of Georgia

Individuals with COVID-19 are most likely to spread the virus to close contacts two days before the onset of symptoms to three days after symptoms appear, and the risk of transmission is highest when patients had mild or moderate disease severity, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Georgia.

Released: 19-Aug-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Immune Response to COVID-19 May Be Proportional to Illness Severity, Duration
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

People with severe or prolonged COVID-19 achieve the highest antibody levels, Rutgers study finds

Released: 16-Aug-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Should you get a third dose of COVID vaccine?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The FDA and CDC have just approved and recommended an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines for moderately and severely immunocompromised people. Who should get it?

Released: 12-Aug-2021 2:55 PM EDT
How Can Nursing Homes Protect Residents From Infection? Follow the Research
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers who have worked for nearly two decades on the previously unglamorous topic of nursing home infection prevention say the spotlight shone because of COVID-19 could accelerate efforts to reduce transmission of all types of microbes.

11-Aug-2021 2:40 PM EDT
World-first COVID vaccine booster randomized clinical trial in transplant patients proves third shot is very effective
University Health Network (UHN)

The study enrolled 120 transplant patients between May 25th and June 3rd. None of them had COVID previously and all of them had received two doses of the Moderna vaccine. Half of the participants received a third shot of the vaccine (at the 2-month mark after their second dose) and the other half received placebo. The primary outcome was based on antibody level greater than 100 U/ml against the spike protein of the virus. In the placebo group - after three doses (where the third dose was placebo), the response rate was only 18% whereas in the Moderna three-dose group, the response rate was 55%.

10-Aug-2021 5:20 PM EDT
World-First COVID Vaccine Booster Randomized Clinical Trial in Transplant Patients Proves Third Shot Is Very Effective
University Health Network (UHN)

The study enrolled 120 transplant patients between May 25th and June 3rd. None of them had COVID previously and all of them had received two doses of the Moderna vaccine. Half of the participants received a third shot of the vaccine (at the 2-month mark after their second dose) and the other half received placebo. The primary outcome was based on antibody level greater than 100 U/ml against the spike protein of the virus. In the placebo group - after three doses (where the third dose was placebo), the response rate was only 18% whereas in the Moderna three-dose group, the response rate was 55%.

22-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
National Poll: Parents Split on Whether to Vaccinate Younger Kids Against COVID
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Many parents are missing opportunities to discuss questions and concerns about the COVID vaccine for kids with a doctor.

Released: 16-Jul-2021 4:05 PM EDT
3D “Assembloid” Shows How SARS-CoV-2 Infects Brain Cells
UC San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine have produced a stem cell model that demonstrates a potential route of entry of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, into the human brain.

Released: 28-Jun-2021 12:30 PM EDT
COVID-19 vaccine generates immune structures critical for lasting immunity
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, published June 28 in the journal Nature, has found evidence that the immune response to Pfizer's mRNA vaccine against COVID-19 is both strong and potentially long-lasting.

Released: 24-Jun-2021 4:55 PM EDT
Virus that causes COVID-19 can find alternate route to infect cells
Washington University in St. Louis

The virus that causes COVID-19 normally gets inside cells by attaching to a protein called ACE2. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a single mutation confers the ability to enter cells through another route, which may threaten the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics designed to block the standard route of entry.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Study Links COVID-19 Public Health Efforts to Dramatic Drop in COPD Hospitalizations
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public health measures designed to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus may have fostered a substantial side benefit: A 53 percent drop in hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), likely due to a drop in circulating seasonal respiratory viruses such as influenza.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 Detectable — Though Likely Not Transmissible — on Hospital Surfaces
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered that SARS-CoV-2, or at least its genetic signature, abounds on hospital surfaces, often co-locating with one particular type of bacteria.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of BIDMC's Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against all the viral variants.

21-May-2021 4:30 PM EDT
For men, low testosterone means high risk of severe COVID-19
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that, among men, low testosterone levels in the blood are linked to more severe COVID-19. The study contradicts widespread assumptions that higher testosterone may explain why men, on average, develop more severe COVID-19 than women do.

Released: 21-May-2021 2:05 AM EDT
Branding the jab: the secret weapon to increase vaccination rates
University of South Australia

As the global race for COVID-19 vaccination continues, new research from the University of South Australia shows that the uptake of vaccines could be vastly improved if approved vaccine brands received more positive promotion and media coverage.

7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
8 Out of 10 People Hospitalized With COVID-19 Develop Neurological Problems and They’re More Likely to Die, Global Study Shows
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A paper published today in JAMA Network Open presents early results of the global effort to gather information about the incidence, severity and outcomes of neurological manifestations of COVID-19 disease.

Released: 11-May-2021 8:55 AM EDT
University of Miami Researchers Report COVID-19 Found in Penile Tissue Could Contribute to ED
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers report the widespread blood vessel dysfunction, or endothelial dysfunction, that results from the COVID-19 infection could contribute to erectile dysfunction, or ED, according to a study published in the World Journal of Men’s Health .

Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that even mild cases of COVID-19 increase the risk of death in the six months following diagnosis and that this risk increases with disease severity. The comprehensive study also catalogues the wide-ranging and long-term health problems often triggered by the infection, even among those not hospitalized.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 Mortality Rates in Los Angeles County Higher in Communities with Poor Air Quality
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A research project led by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has found that Los Angeles County neighborhoods with poor air quality had the highest death rates from the pandemic.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Study: Race Made No Difference in ICU Outcomes of COVID-19 Patients
Henry Ford Health

In a study that looked at racial differences in outcomes of COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit, researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit found that patients of color had a lower 28-day mortality than white patients. Race, however, was not a factor in overall hospital mortality, length of stay in the ICU or in the rate of patients placed on mechanical ventilation, researchers said. The findings, published in Critical Care Medicine, are believed to be one of the first in the United States to study racial differences and outcomes specific to patients hospitalized in the ICU with COVID-19.

Released: 23-Mar-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Though Risk is Minuscule, Infection after COVID-19 Vaccination is Possible
UC San Diego Health

Investigators from UC San Diego and UCLA report COVID-19 infection rates for a cohort of health care workers previously vaccinated for the novel coronavirus. Risk of infection is minuscule, but exists.

19-Mar-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Study underscores need for multidisciplinary care for COVID-19 long-haulers
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

A comprehensive review published today in Nature Medicine offers an initial glimpse of the multi-organ effects of long-term COVID-19 and suggests a framework for the care of COVID-19 long-haulers through dedicated, multidisciplinary clinics.


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