Breaking News: Drought

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Released: 16-Jun-2022 6:30 PM EDT
Droughts in the Sixth Century Paved the Way for Islam
University of Basel

Extreme dry conditions contributed to the decline of the ancient South Arabian kingdom of Himyar.

Newswise: Danish Astrophysics Student Discovers Link Between Global Warming and Locally Unstable Weather
Released: 25-May-2022 3:50 PM EDT
Danish Astrophysics Student Discovers Link Between Global Warming and Locally Unstable Weather
University of Copenhagen

Climate change gives rise to more unstable weather, local droughts and extreme temperature records, but a coherent theory relating local and global climate is still under active development.

Newswise: How do rootstocks help tomato growers under heat and drought?
Released: 23-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
How do rootstocks help tomato growers under heat and drought?
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Certain rootstocks may improve plant performance by enhancing the amount of root biomass used to support shoot function

Newswise: New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain
Released: 19-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
New strategies to save the world’s most indispensable grain
University of California, Riverside

Plants — they’re just like us, with unique techniques for handling stress.

Newswise: World “at a crossroads” in management of droughts, up 29% in a generation and worsening: UN
Released: 11-May-2022 3:20 PM EDT
World “at a crossroads” in management of droughts, up 29% in a generation and worsening: UN
United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

Humanity is “at a crossroads” when it comes to managing drought and accelerating mitigation must be done “urgently, using every tool we can,” says a new report from the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD).

Newswise: News from the climate history of the Dead Sea
Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
News from the climate history of the Dead Sea
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam

The lake level of the Dead Sea is currently dropping by more than one metre every year - mainly because of the heavy water consumption in the catchment area.

Newswise: Modeling Study Projects 21st Century Droughts Will Increase Human Migration
Released: 26-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Modeling Study Projects 21st Century Droughts Will Increase Human Migration
Stony Brook University

Drought and the potential increase in the number of droughts worldwide due to climate change remains a concern for scientists. A recent study led by Stony Brook University researchers suggests that human migration due to droughts will increase by at least 200 percent as we move through the 21st Century.

Newswise: With dwindling water supplies, the timing of rainfall matters
Released: 18-Apr-2022 1:55 PM EDT
With dwindling water supplies, the timing of rainfall matters
University of California, Riverside

A new UC Riverside study shows it’s not how much extra water you give your plants, but when you give it that counts.

Newswise: Predicting Methane Dynamics during Drought Recovery
Released: 13-Apr-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Predicting Methane Dynamics during Drought Recovery
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Spatially isolated “hot spots” and brief “hot moments” shape methane emissions from tropical forest soils. In this research, scientists used model simulation to understand how microbes and soil variables contribute to the soil’s methane production and consumption. The models indicate that drought alters the diffusion of oxygen and microbes into and out of soil, leading to increased methane release from the entire hillslope during drought recovery. This finding is important for understanding sources of methane, an important greenhouse gas.

Released: 7-Apr-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Study Examines Financial Risks of Water Resilience Planning in California
Cornell University

Partnerships between water utilities, irrigation districts and other stakeholders in California will play a critical role in funding new infrastructure under the Water Resilience Portfolio Initiative announced in 2020 by Gov. Gavin Newsom, but a new study warns that benefits might not be evenly distributed without proper structure to the agreements.

Newswise: Global team of scientists determine 'fingerprint' for how much heat, drought is too much for forests
1-Apr-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Global team of scientists determine 'fingerprint' for how much heat, drought is too much for forests
University of Florida

A new study, “Global field observations of tree die-off reveal hotter-drought fingerprint for Earth’s forests,” compiled a global database of the published locations of climate-induced forest die-off events, from 1970-2018, across 675 locations. After analyzing the climate conditions at each location during each event, researchers found a common ‘hotter-drought fingerprint’ for Earth’s forests, a term that describes the combination of higher temperatures and more frequent droughts for a lethal set of climate conditions.

Released: 25-Mar-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Rescued Victorian rainfall data smashes former records
University of Reading

Record-breaking Victorian weather has been revealed after millions of archived rainfall records dating back nearly 200 years were rescued by thousands of volunteers during the first Covid-19 lockdown.

Newswise: Nature-based solutions in mountains can reduce climate change impact on drought
Released: 9-Mar-2022 4:40 PM EST
Nature-based solutions in mountains can reduce climate change impact on drought
University of South Africa

New research, led by Dr Petra Holden from the African Climate and Development Initiative (ACDI) at the University of Cape Town (UCT), has shown how catchment restoration – through the management of alien tree infestation in the mountains of the southwestern Cape – could have lessened the impact of climate change on low river flows during the Cape Town “Day Zero” drought.

Released: 9-Feb-2022 2:05 PM EST
Co-occurring droughts could threaten global food security
Washington State University

Droughts occurring at the same time across different regions of the planet could place an unprecedented strain on the global agricultural system and threaten the water security of millions of people, according to a new study in Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: UF study shows how climate change can worsen impact of invasive plants
Released: 8-Feb-2022 9:50 AM EST
UF study shows how climate change can worsen impact of invasive plants
University of Florida

Scientists have long hypothesized that climate change, by intensifying stressors like drought or wildfires, would make an ecosystem more vulnerable to invasive plants. Those invasive plants may in turn alter the environment in ways that amplify the impacts of climate change, explained Luke Flory, a professor of ecology in the UF/IFAS agronomy department. A new long-term field study conducted by Flory’s lab offers the first experimental evidence to support this hypothesis.

Newswise: Hot spots’ help shed light on flash drought causes, Clemson University civil engineers say
Released: 3-Feb-2022 1:50 PM EST
Hot spots’ help shed light on flash drought causes, Clemson University civil engineers say
Clemson University

Two Clemson University civil engineers said their newly published research is the most comprehensive analysis so far of what causes flash drought, a weather phenomenon that has been blamed for billions of dollars in crop damage and increased wildfire risk.

Newswise: Desert shrubs cranked up water use efficiency to survive a megadrought. It may not be enough.
15-Dec-2021 4:15 PM EST
Desert shrubs cranked up water use efficiency to survive a megadrought. It may not be enough.
University of Utah

Shrubs in the desert Southwest have increased their water use efficiency at some of the highest rates ever observed to cope with a decades-long megadrought. That’s the finding of a new study from University of Utah researchers, who found that although the shrubs’ efficiency increases are unprecedented and heroic, they may not be enough to adapt to the long-term drying trend in the West.

Released: 10-Dec-2021 4:20 PM EST
Has winter blown off course? ASU professors discuss how a lack of snow is impacting drought, water supply, and tourism in the West
Arizona State University (ASU)

ASU News enlisted the state’s climatologist and a tourism expert to discuss this year’s cause and effects of snow, or lack thereof, and the impacts to our water supply and economy.

1-Dec-2021 1:30 PM EST
Microgrids and Solar Reduce Risk of Power Outages
Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

Climate change is fueling more floods, droughts, wildfires, and extreme storms across the United States. As a result, aging power grids are being pushed beyond their limits, sometimes with deadly impacts. (In 2020, a series of unusual winter storms knocked the power out in Texas for days -- leading to shortages of water and heat and more than 100 deaths.)

Newswise: Global warming, not just drought, drives bark beetles to kill more ponderosa pines
Released: 23-Nov-2021 1:15 PM EST
Global warming, not just drought, drives bark beetles to kill more ponderosa pines
Los Alamos National Laboratory

In California’s Sierra Nevada, western pine beetle infestations amped up by global warming were found to kill 30% more ponderosa pine trees than the beetles do under drought alone.

Newswise: Fires in the Sierra Nevada likely to grow in frequency
Released: 17-Nov-2021 6:35 PM EST
Fires in the Sierra Nevada likely to grow in frequency
University of California, Irvine

Naturalist John Muir called the Sierra Nevada “the Range of Light.” But a more ominous nickname, “the Range of Fire,” may lie ahead, according to new research from the University of California, Irvine. By 2040, as humans continue to change the climate, fire-conducive heat waves will become so common that the number of blazes throughout the Sierra stands to increase about 50 percent, researchers found.

Released: 10-Nov-2021 12:50 PM EST
During Historic Drought, Higher Temperatures Helped Beetle Kill More California Pine Trees
North Carolina State University

Increased temperatures during an historic drought in California contributed to the death of large numbers of giant pine trees speeding up the life cycle of a tree-killing beetle.

Newswise: Study explores the global distribution, trends and drivers of flash droughts
Released: 3-Nov-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Study explores the global distribution, trends and drivers of flash droughts
University of Oklahoma

Flash droughts are described as rapidly developing, unexpected periods of drought. These flash droughts can cause severe impacts to agricultural and ecological systems and cause ripple effects that extend even further.

Released: 27-Sep-2021 7:05 AM EDT
The Kids Are Not Alright
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Children are to face disproportionate increases in lifetime extreme event exposure – especially in low-income countries, according to new research by an international group of scientists.

Released: 21-Sep-2021 9:30 AM EDT
To solve Brazil’s energy and food crisis: store more water
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Storing greater amounts of water in Brazil’s reservoirs could increase precipitation and river flow, alleviating the water and energy supply crisis in Brazil.

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Released: 17-Sep-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Chemical discovery gets reluctant seeds to sprout
University of California, Riverside

Seeds that would otherwise lie dormant will spring to life with the aid of a new chemical discovered by a UC Riverside-led team.

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Released: 15-Sep-2021 9:55 AM EDT
Professor part of massive field lab researching global warming's impact on water sources
Indiana University

At a time when a drought is affecting the 40 million people who rely on the Colorado River system, Indiana University professor Travis O'Brien and a team of scientific colleagues are embarking on a monumental U.S. Department of Energy project to better predict the future of water availability in the West.

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Released: 15-Sep-2021 4:05 AM EDT
Jet stream changes could amplify weather extremes by 2060s
University of Arizona

New research provides insights into how the position and intensity of the North Atlantic jet stream has changed during the past 1,250 years.

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Released: 7-Sep-2021 5:35 PM EDT
Climate crisis could double frequency of extreme regional summer droughts in Europe
Frontiers

The ongoing climate crisis has already had drastic global impacts.

Newswise: Dams ineffective for cold-water conservation
Released: 26-Aug-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Dams ineffective for cold-water conservation
University of California, Davis

Dams poorly mimic the temperature patterns California streams require to support the state’s native salmon and trout — more than three-quarters of which risk extinction.

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23-Aug-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Mountains of Data: An Unprecedented Climate Observatory to Understand the Future of Water
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Mountain watersheds provide 60 to 90% of water resources worldwide, but there is still much that scientists don’t know about the physical processes and interactions that affect hydrology in these ecosystems. Now a team of U.S. Department of Energy scientists led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) aims to plug that gap, with an ambitious campaign to collect a vast array of measurements that will allow scientists to better understand the future of water in the West.

Newswise:Video Embedded breakthrough-cases-and-covid-boosters-live-expert-panel-for-august-18-2021
VIDEO
Released: 19-Aug-2021 3:00 PM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Breakthrough Cases and COVID Boosters: Live Expert Panel for August 18, 2021
Newswise

Expert Q&A: Do breakthrough cases mean we will soon need COVID boosters? The extremely contagious Delta variant continues to spread, prompting mask mandates, proof of vaccination, and other measures. Media invited to ask the experts about these and related topics.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
DOE Announces $11 Million to Study Critical Ecosystems and Improve Climate and Earth System Modeling
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $11 million in funding for new research studying how critical ecosystems, such as forests, arid lands, and coastal environments, are impacted by extreme weather events, such as floods, droughts, and heat waves.

Newswise: Why Remote Work Might Worsen Southwest Water Woes
Released: 12-Jul-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Why Remote Work Might Worsen Southwest Water Woes
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

As concerns flare over record-low water levels at Lake Mead, a new UNLV study shows that COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home orders — and a subsequent societal shift to remote work — may be exacerbating the problem.

Released: 29-Jun-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Hotter, more frequent droughts threaten California's iconic blue oak woodlands
Frontiers

The devastating 2012 - 2016 drought in California triggered widespread tree cover loss and die-offs of a variety of species in the region.

Released: 24-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Drought Affects Aspen Survival Decades Later, New NAU Study Finds
Northern Arizona University

Research specialist Melissa Boyd and Regents' professor Michelle Mack from Northern Arizona University led the study, which demonstrated the long-term effects of climate change on this vegetation.

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Released: 24-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
PIRE Research Connects Air Pollution to Worst Taiwanese Drought in Nearly 60 Years
University at Albany, State University of New York

The study, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, analyzed 13 years of satellite and surface to better understand how aerosols impact cloud lifecycle and precipitation during the autumn months over northern Taiwan.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Climate Change Is Driving Plant Die-Offs In Southern California, UCI Study Finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2021 – A shift is happening in Southern California, and this time it has nothing to do with earthquakes. According to a new study by scientists at the University of California, Irvine, climate change is altering the number of plants populating the region’s deserts and mountains. Using data from the Landsat satellite mission and focusing on an area of nearly 5,000 square miles surrounding Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, the research team found that between 1984 and 2017, vegetation cover in desert ecosystems decreased overall by about 35 percent, with mountains seeing a 13 percent vegetation decline.

Released: 16-Apr-2021 2:05 AM EDT
SA Hub will Help Build Resilience to Drought
University of Adelaide

The University of Adelaide, as part of an extensive collaboration with industry and the South Australian Government, will lead a new drought resilience hub in South Australia. Announced today, the hub will undertake research, development, extension, adoption and commercialisation activities to improve drought resilience and preparedness on SA farms.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 8:05 PM EDT
‘Animal-stress’ signal improves plant drought resilience
University of Adelaide

A team of Australian and German researchers has discovered a novel pathway that plants can use to save water and improve their drought tolerance. The research published in Nature Communications shows that the molecule GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), most commonly associated with relaxation in animals, can control the size of the pores on plant leaves to minimise water loss.


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