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Newswise: corinne-wieben.jpg
Released: 28-Oct-2021 2:45 AM EDT
Associate Professor Delivers Spooky Spirits, Magic and Witchcraft During Halloween – and Beyond
University of Northern Colorado

Associate Professor of History, Corinne Wieben, Ph.D., teaches the history of magic at the University of Northern Colorado in HIST 264: Magic in Europe from Antiquity to the Enlightenment.

Newswise: Q&A: Dr. Mark Gregory Robson, 2021 Recipient of The Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award
Released: 13-Oct-2021 8:50 AM EDT
Q&A: Dr. Mark Gregory Robson, 2021 Recipient of The Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Mark Gregory Robson, an internationally recognized scholar in environmental risk assessment and toxicology and a dedicated student mentor has been named the 2021 recipient of the Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award. The Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor and Distinguished Professor of Plant Biology at Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s School of Environmental and Biological Sciences studies the health effects of agricultural chemicals and food production practices in developing countries, which has resulted in important policy changes regarding the safe use of pesticides. Robson will deliver the Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award Lecture, “Rutgers – A Public University in the Land Grant Tradition that Provides Opportunities: How We Can Teach Our Students to Address Critical Global Issues” on Oct. 19.

Newswise: Game On - Students Share UNC Experience Through Game Design Event
Released: 12-Oct-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Game On - Students Share UNC Experience Through Game Design Event
University of Northern Colorado

Knowing how tech-reliant the world is becoming, Matthew Farber wanted to host a ‘Game Jam’ to give students, particularly those studying education, a chance to learn how to navigate systems.

Released: 4-Oct-2021 4:35 PM EDT
UAlbany Experts Available to Discuss Cybersecurity Awareness Month
University at Albany, State University of New York

The University at Albany has several experts available to discuss the importance of Cybersecurity Awareness Month and how to best protect yourself against cybercrimes.

Newswise: Passion for Social Work Leads to Connections Between Students, Community Organizations
Released: 23-Sep-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Passion for Social Work Leads to Connections Between Students, Community Organizations
SUNY Buffalo State College

Karen Edmond, director of field education for the Social Work Department at Buffalo State College, shares her thoughts on the profession and how she is helping the next generation of social workers find their placements, right after she was appointed to the Field Directors Committee of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for all social work education programs across the United States.

Newswise:Video Embedded in-powerful-testimony-to-u-s-congress-green-bronx-machine-s-stephen-ritz-calls-for-an-end-to-hunger-in-american-schools
VIDEO
Released: 15-Sep-2021 3:25 PM EDT
In Powerful Testimony to U.S. Congress, Green Bronx Machine’s Stephen Ritz Calls for an End to Hunger in American Schools
Green Bronx Machine

In powerful testimony to members of the United States Congress today, Stephen Ritz, acclaimed teacher, founder of Green Bronx Machine and best-selling author of The Power of a Plant: A Teacher’s Odyssey to Grow Healthy Minds and Schools, made the case for public schools’ role in ending hunger and improving health and nutrition in America.

Newswise:Video Embedded in-powerful-testimony-to-u-s-congress-green-bronx-machine-s-stephen-ritz-calls-for-an-end-to-hunger-in-american-schools
VIDEO
Released: 15-Sep-2021 3:25 PM EDT
In Powerful Testimony to U.S. Congress, Green Bronx Machine’s Stephen Ritz Calls for an End to Hunger in American Schools
Green Bronx Machine

In powerful testimony to members of the United States Congress today, Stephen Ritz, acclaimed teacher, founder of Green Bronx Machine and best-selling author of The Power of a Plant: A Teacher’s Odyssey to Grow Healthy Minds and Schools, made the case for public schools’ role in ending hunger and improving health and nutrition in America.

Newswise: Rutgers Pediatrician Advocates for Continued Masking and Precautions to Reduce Risks of COVID-19 in Children
Released: 9-Sep-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Rutgers Pediatrician Advocates for Continued Masking and Precautions to Reduce Risks of COVID-19 in Children
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

As parents plan for children to return to school, Dr. Kleinman shares ways to mitigate the risk of becoming ill with COVID-19.

Released: 7-Sep-2021 1:50 PM EDT
UA Little Rock Researcher Explores Community College Stigma in High School Seniors
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Most high school seniors consider factors like cost, majors, and distance from home when deciding where to go to college. Bradley Griffith, a graduating Doctor of Education student at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and director of fitness at John A. Logan College in Carterville, Illinois, thinks there is another very real, but invisible factor at play that affects where seniors go to college – community college stigma.

Newswise: Asking new questions
Released: 18-Aug-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Asking new questions
University of Redlands

Dr. Mario Martinez asks new questions in his new book, "The Science of Higher Education: State Higher Education Policy and the Laws of Scale"

Newswise: Child's Play
Released: 18-Aug-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Child's Play
University of Delaware

Children are wildly over scheduled being rushed from this lesson to that practice, on top of academic preparation. UD researchers speak to the value of unstructured play that teaches skills such as creativity and self-direction.

Newswise: School Can be Scary in a Pandemic: Johns Hopkins Team Created App to Help Teachers Know How Kids are Feeling
Released: 18-Aug-2021 11:05 AM EDT
School Can be Scary in a Pandemic: Johns Hopkins Team Created App to Help Teachers Know How Kids are Feeling
Johns Hopkins University

Two Johns Hopkins University researchers who study classroom stress and the emotional well-being of students and teachers have released an app that allows teachers to get daily reports about how their students are feeling. Though the tool wasn’t created for the pandemic, it certainly has come in handy over the last year as educators struggle to keep tabs on students, especially if they’re teaching remotely.

Newswise: shutterstock_1926866741.jpg
Released: 10-Aug-2021 1:05 PM EDT
WashU Expert: Along with Child Tax Credits, Invest in Child Development Accounts
Washington University in St. Louis

Democrats have called for a permanent expansion of the monthly child tax credit, which will continue through the end of the year. In making the expanded credit permanent, lawmakers can leverage the power of child development accounts to build assets for all children in the United States, says a Washington University in St. Louis expert on asset building.

Newswise: Reopening Anxiety? Here’s How to Overcome it According to University of Kentucky Experts
Released: 29-Jun-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Reopening Anxiety? Here’s How to Overcome it According to University of Kentucky Experts
University of Kentucky

For nearly a year, we relied on masks to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Now, many are removing the facial coverings, but that doesn’t mean it will be easy to shed the anxiety that accompanies a global pandemic. If you’re having difficulty coping with this added stress, psychology experts at the University of Kentucky say you’re not alone.

Released: 24-Jun-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Supreme Court: Off-campus student speech protected, but schools do have power to regulate
University of Georgia

The Supreme Court’s 8-1 recent decision in Mahanoy allows both sides to claim victory, according to Clare Norins, director of the University of Georgia School of Law’s First Amendment Clinic, who also serves as an assistant clinical professor.

Newswise: Media Law, Communication, and Free Speech Expert Comments on Supreme Court Ruling on a Student’s Profane Rant
Released: 23-Jun-2021 5:50 PM EDT
Media Law, Communication, and Free Speech Expert Comments on Supreme Court Ruling on a Student’s Profane Rant
California State University, Fullerton

Jason Shepard, professor of Communications at California State University, Fullerton, specializes in media law and is available to comment on this morning’s 8-1 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the free speech of a high school cheerleader who posted a profane rant on Snapchat in 2017.

Newswise: California’s Top Autism and Special Education Law Firm Director James D. Peters III Featured in Lawyer Monthly Magazine
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
California’s Top Autism and Special Education Law Firm Director James D. Peters III Featured in Lawyer Monthly Magazine
Special Education Law Division; Law Offices of Sheila C. Bayne

Q&A with Peters addresses class action suit to obtain services for children with special needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: URI professor plays prominent role in development of  PBS Kids’ show Elinor Wonders Why
Released: 17-May-2021 9:40 AM EDT
URI professor plays prominent role in development of PBS Kids’ show Elinor Wonders Why
University of Rhode Island

University of Rhode Island Professor of Education Sara Sweetman helped build the foundation for success of PBS Kids show Elinor Wonders Why™ among others

Released: 22-Mar-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Social and Emotional Learning Crucial to Valued Outcomes, Rutgers Expert Says
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Studies show that social and emotional learning could reduce school violence and harassment, while improving attendance, graduation rates and perceptions of school climate. But Maurice Elias, a professor of psychology and director of the Rutgers Social-Emotional and Character Developmental Lab, says in order for that to occur, social and emotional learning (SEL) must become the norm in schools nationwide.

Newswise: Teaching Students About Deaf Culture
Released: 16-Mar-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Teaching Students About Deaf Culture
SUNY Buffalo State College

Amy Crockford, the coordinator of Buffalo State College's American Sign Language program, will soon have the opportunity to introduce students to the intricacies of deaf and hard-of-hearing life through a new elective, SLP 330: Deaf Culture in America.

Released: 4-Mar-2021 1:50 PM EST
Schools Need Ongoing Support Following Pandemic, Rutgers Expert Says
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Bruce Baker, a school finance expert at Rutgers, talks about where administrators should spend money and the challenges the Biden administration faces as schools prepare for a new normal.

Released: 2-Mar-2021 3:15 PM EST
Reflections on emergency remote teaching for lab courses
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

One year after COVID-19 rapidly transformed university learning, professors reflect on tools for resiliency.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 1:00 PM EST
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Experts Available to Discuss Colorectal Cancer Topics through March
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Various specialists from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey are available for comment on colorectal cancer topics during the month of March to highlight colorectal cancer awareness month.

Newswise: Institutional Impacts on Enrollment from Forthcoming Demographic Cliff Will Vary Widely
Released: 16-Feb-2021 6:05 AM EST
Institutional Impacts on Enrollment from Forthcoming Demographic Cliff Will Vary Widely
Othot

The “birth dearth” of the 2008 economic recession means fewer students will graduate from high school through at least 2032, draining college enrollments and revenues. Admissions research firm, Othot, published a report analyzing how this might affect 454 colleges and universities. As an example, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois – Chicago which are in the same region, will experience the national and regional declines differently because of where they recruit.

Released: 10-Feb-2021 12:50 PM EST
Most U.S. Schools Teaching Black History, But Few Doing It Well
Johns Hopkins University

As the United States marks Black History Month this year, more K-12 schools in the United States are teaching Black history than ever before. However, ongoing analysis from Johns Hopkins University finds these efforts often fail, because coursework emphasizes the negative aspects of African American life while omitting important contributions made by families of color in literature, politics, theology, art, and medicine.

Newswise: Returning to In-Person School During COVID-19: A Live Q &A with Mott Doctors
Released: 27-Jan-2021 10:30 AM EST
Returning to In-Person School During COVID-19: A Live Q &A with Mott Doctors
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Some students are starting to return to face-to-face school after months of remote learning during the pandemic. Experts will address parents' top questions about the transition.

Released: 20-Jan-2021 5:10 PM EST
Faculty Members Reflect on Insurrection at Capitol
SUNY Buffalo State College

As the U.S. House worked on January 13 on impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump for inciting the violent mob, four Buffalo State College faculty members shared their observations of the breach of the U.S. Capitol through the lenses of history, criminal justice, political science, and business.

Released: 22-Dec-2020 12:55 PM EST
Financial Literacy Can Help with Long-Term Wealth
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The road to financial literacy – and ultimately financial independence – is a long one. Embarking on this journey requires the right mindset and desire to improve continuously, according to John Longo, a professor of professional practice at Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.


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