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Newswise: Food Paradox Answer Shows How Ocean Life Survives #ASA181
18-Nov-2021 2:55 PM EST
Food Paradox Answer Shows How Ocean Life Survives #ASA181
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Ocean predators cannot survive on average concentrations of food found in the water. Instead, they survive by exploiting small patches of food-rich areas peppered throughout the world's waterways. Using active acoustics, researchers found the ocean is widely populated with narrow hotspots of activity. Traditionally, these hotspots are missed with conventional sampling tools, but locating them can provide dynamic layered maps of ocean life. The findings signify ocean food and biota as patchy, varying with depth and location, suggesting animals must find and exploit small-scale aggregations of resources.

Newswise: Scientists Discover Link Between Climate Change and Biological Evolution of Phytoplankton
1-Dec-2021 8:05 AM EST
Scientists Discover Link Between Climate Change and Biological Evolution of Phytoplankton
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Using artificial intelligence techniques, an international team that included Rutgers-New Brunswick researchers have traced the evolution of coccolithophores, an ocean-dwelling phytoplankton group, over 2.8 million years. Their findings, published this week in the journal Nature, reveal new evidence that evolutionary cycles in a marine phytoplankton group are related to changes in tropical seasonality, shedding light on the link between biological evolution and climate change.

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Embargo will expire: 13-Dec-2021 12:15 PM EST Released to reporters: 1-Dec-2021 9:05 AM EST

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Newswise: Ancient lineage of algae found to include five “cryptic” species
Released: 30-Nov-2021 5:10 PM EST
Ancient lineage of algae found to include five “cryptic” species
University of Göttingen

All land plants originated from a single evolutionary event when freshwater algae got a foothold on land, giving rise to an astonishing biodiversity of plants on earth.

Newswise: Warm-water habitat ‘pays the bills,’ allowing cold-water fish to fuel up
Released: 30-Nov-2021 2:20 PM EST
Warm-water habitat ‘pays the bills,’ allowing cold-water fish to fuel up
Oregon State University

New Oregon State University research shows that warm-water habitats can be critically important for the survival of cold-water fish such as trout and salmon.

Newswise: Windy Days May Be Good Against Covid-19
Released: 30-Nov-2021 12:20 PM EST
Windy Days May Be Good Against Covid-19
Stony Brook University

A new study led by Stony Brook University researchers indicates that low wind speeds and stale air are associated with a higher incidence of contracting Covid-19 when people socialize outside – perhaps as much as 45 percent more compared to when winds are stronger.

Newswise: Antarctic drilling project to offer insight into climate future
Released: 30-Nov-2021 11:25 AM EST
Antarctic drilling project to offer insight into climate future
Binghamton University, State University of New York

An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York will drill into the ocean floor to discover the West Antarctic Ice Sheet's sensitivity to global warming.

Released: 30-Nov-2021 9:00 AM EST
Gulf of Mexico Alliance Receives National Leadership Award for Community Resilience and Conservation Partnership
Gulf of Mexico Alliance

The Gulf of Mexico Alliance announced they have recently received a 2021 Climate Adaptation Leadership Award from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. This national award recognizes exceptional leadership in advancing adaptation of natural resources in a changing world. The Alliance received the honorable mention award in the Broad Partnerships category.

Newswise: Snow monkeys go fishing to survive harsh Japanese winters - study
Released: 29-Nov-2021 5:20 PM EST
Snow monkeys go fishing to survive harsh Japanese winters - study
University of Birmingham

Snow monkeys living in one of the world’s coldest regions survive by ‘going fishing’ – scooping live animals, including brown trout, out of Japanese rivers and eating them to stay alive, a new study reveals.

Newswise: University of California Team’s Research Suggests More Than 400 Hazardous Sites in California Face Flooding
Released: 29-Nov-2021 5:05 PM EST
University of California Team’s Research Suggests More Than 400 Hazardous Sites in California Face Flooding
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Unless climate change is slowed significantly, more than three feet of sea level rise (SLR) is expected in California by the end of the century, potentially flooding communities that are currently home to more than 145,000 residents. In addition to the threat to residential neighborhoods, new research suggests sea level rise will expose over 400 industrial facilities and contaminated sites in California, including power plants, refineries, and hazardous waste sites, to increased risk of flooding. Increased flooding can come with risks of contamination releases into nearby communities.

Newswise: Waterfall sounds used as a telltale sign of water loss
Released: 29-Nov-2021 4:15 PM EST
Waterfall sounds used as a telltale sign of water loss
American Geophysical Union (AGU)

Waterfalls have a specific threshold of water flow that must be maintained to preserve their characteristic sound and appearance, according to research that used audio recordings and images to monitor waterfalls in Europe.

Released: 29-Nov-2021 4:05 PM EST
Eight worst wildfire weather years on record happened in the last decade: study
University of Alberta

The world’s eight most extreme wildfire weather years have occurred in the last decade, according to a new study that suggests extreme fire weather is being driven by a decrease in atmospheric humidity coupled with rising temperatures.

Released: 29-Nov-2021 2:05 PM EST
The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Online Only in 2022
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Beginning in January 2022, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior will become an online journal.

Newswise: Rhythms of the Krill
Released: 29-Nov-2021 11:55 AM EST
Rhythms of the Krill
University of Delaware

New research finds that Arctic krill have a biological response to changes in light. When it is lightest in the Arctic polar night, usually around the middle of the day known as midday twilight, the krill know to swim down to the bottom in order to hide from predators. When it is darkest in the Arctic polar night, that’s when they swim to the surface in search of bioluminescent food.

Released: 29-Nov-2021 11:50 AM EST
Can United Nations conference save Antarctic glaciers?
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska scientist says time is running out for West Antarctic ice sheet

Released: 29-Nov-2021 11:45 AM EST
Recycling of tectonic plates a key driver of Earth’s oxygen budget
Cornell University

A new study co-led by a Cornell researcher has identified serpentinite – a green rock that looks a bit like snakeskin and holds fluids in its mineral structures – as a key driver of the oxygen recycling process, which helped create and maintain the sustaining atmosphere for life on Earth.

29-Nov-2021 4:05 AM EST
Why we must avoid temperature overshoot
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new international study coordinated by IIASA shows how near-term mitigation can help to prevent an overshoot in global temperatures, thereby reducing climate risks and bringing long-term economic gains.

Released: 25-Nov-2021 2:30 PM EST
Crowdsourcing data to monitor progress on the SDGs
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new IIASA-led study explored the use of a citizen science tool known as Picture Pile to see how it could contribute to monitoring progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Newswise: Arctic Ocean started getting warmer decades earlier than we thought - Study
Released: 24-Nov-2021 4:20 PM EST
Arctic Ocean started getting warmer decades earlier than we thought - Study
University of Cambridge

The Arctic Ocean has been getting warmer since the beginning of the 20th century – decades earlier than records suggest – due to warmer water flowing into the delicate polar ecosystem from the Atlantic Ocean.

Released: 24-Nov-2021 2:05 PM EST
The claim that "Greenland's ice sheet isn't shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago" is false
Newswise

Steven Koonin, former Undersecretary for Science in the Obama Administration says that the media is exaggerating the climate crisis. In a recent video for Prager U, Koonin offered several statements that address flooding, hurricanes and the melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We address the claim that "Greenland's ice sheet isn't shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago." Our analysis: this claim is mostly false.

Newswise: Himalayan bats are functionally less diverse at high than at lower elevations, but show the same evolutionary diversity
Released: 24-Nov-2021 11:30 AM EST
Himalayan bats are functionally less diverse at high than at lower elevations, but show the same evolutionary diversity
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW)

Million years of evolution have produced a dazzling variety of species, each uniquely adapted to its environment.

Newswise: Tectonic shift in Southern Ocean caused dramatic ancient cooling event
Released: 24-Nov-2021 10:35 AM EST
Tectonic shift in Southern Ocean caused dramatic ancient cooling event
University of Leicester

New research has shed light on a sudden cooling event 34 million years ago, which contributed to formation of the Antarctic ice sheets.

Newswise: When bees get a taste for dead things
Released: 23-Nov-2021 2:30 PM EST
When bees get a taste for dead things
University of California, Riverside

A little-known species of tropical bee has evolved an extra tooth for biting flesh and a gut that more closely resembles that of vultures rather than other bees.

Newswise: Global warming, not just drought, drives bark beetles to kill more ponderosa pines
Released: 23-Nov-2021 1:15 PM EST
Global warming, not just drought, drives bark beetles to kill more ponderosa pines
Los Alamos National Laboratory

In California’s Sierra Nevada, western pine beetle infestations amped up by global warming were found to kill 30% more ponderosa pine trees than the beetles do under drought alone.

Newswise: Zeroing in on New Technologies to Better Define Tropical Storms
Released: 23-Nov-2021 9:40 AM EST
Zeroing in on New Technologies to Better Define Tropical Storms
Stony Brook University

Pavlos Kollias, PhD, of Stony Brook University, is part of a new NASA Earth Science mission that aims to yield new information about tropical storm clouds –data that will help scientists better understand and predict the behavior of dangerous tropical storms and address a significant issue of climate change.

19-Nov-2021 11:40 AM EST
Vehicles are an under-recognized source of urban ammonia pollution
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers report in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology Letters that satellite data from before & during the spring 2020 lockdown in Los Angeles shows that vehicles are the main source of urban airborne ammonia, which forms small particles that contribute to air pollution & harm human health.

Newswise: How to eat a poison butterfly
Released: 22-Nov-2021 5:10 PM EST
How to eat a poison butterfly
University of California, Riverside

Scientists now understand how certain animals can feed on picturesque, orange monarch butterflies, which are filled from head to abdomen with milkweed plant toxins.

Newswise: Study: Remote Ocean Wilderness Areas are “Living Time Machines,” Teeming with Large Fish
Released: 22-Nov-2021 4:55 PM EST
Study: Remote Ocean Wilderness Areas are “Living Time Machines,” Teeming with Large Fish
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new, widespread study of the global state of marine coral reef wilderness by WCS, NGS, and university collaborators found that remote ocean wilderness areas are sustaining fish populations much better than some of the world’s best marine reserves.

Newswise: Bird study illustrates the interplay between disease transmission and behavior
Released: 22-Nov-2021 11:05 AM EST
Bird study illustrates the interplay between disease transmission and behavior
Iowa State University

A new study that looks at an eye disease in house finches shows how behavior and disease pathology interact to contribute to the spread of a pathogen. The study appears in the academic journal Biology Letters.

Newswise: 900-mile mantle pipeline connects Galápagos to Panama
Released: 22-Nov-2021 7:05 AM EST
900-mile mantle pipeline connects Galápagos to Panama
Cornell University

A Cornell University geochemist has helped discover solid evidence that connects the geochemical fingerprint of the Galápagos plume with mantle materials underneath Panama and Costa Rica – documenting the course of a mantle plume that flows sideways through upper portions of the Earth.

Newswise: Nations are overusing natural resources faster than they are meeting basic human needs
Released: 19-Nov-2021 6:10 PM EST
Nations are overusing natural resources faster than they are meeting basic human needs
University of Leeds

For at least the last 30 years, not a single country has met the basic needs of its residents without overconsuming natural resources, according to new research led by the University of Leeds.

Newswise: DOE Funding will Support WHOI Research to Support Sustainable Development of Offshore Wind
Released: 19-Nov-2021 1:00 PM EST
DOE Funding will Support WHOI Research to Support Sustainable Development of Offshore Wind
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has received $750,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop next‐generation autonomous robotic technology for environmental monitoring of marine organisms and the seafloor at potential wind energy development areas on the U.S. West Coast.

Newswise: Antarctic ice-sheet destabilized within a decade
Released: 18-Nov-2021 4:50 PM EST
Antarctic ice-sheet destabilized within a decade
University of Bonn

After the natural warming that followed the last Ice Age, there were repeated periods when masses of icebergs broke off from Antarctica into the Southern Ocean.

Newswise: Stalagmites as key witnesses of the monsoon
Released: 18-Nov-2021 3:25 PM EST
Stalagmites as key witnesses of the monsoon
Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry

The ice sheets of Greenland are melting at an alarming rate. This causes large amounts of freshwater to flow into the North Atlantic, thereby slowing the Gulf Stream.

Released: 18-Nov-2021 12:25 PM EST
Bacteria may be key to sustainably extracting earth elements for tech
Cornell University

A new study describes a proof of principle for engineering a bacterium, Gluconobacter oxydans, that takes a big first step towards meeting skyrocketing rare earth element demand in a way that matches the cost and efficiency of traditional thermochemical extraction and refinement methods and is clean enough to meet U.S. environmental standards.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-new-survey-confirms-that-gabon-is-the-largest-stronghold-for-critically-endangered-african-forest-elephants
VIDEO
Released: 18-Nov-2021 10:40 AM EST
STUDY: New Survey Confirms that Gabon is the Largest Stronghold for Critically Endangered African Forest Elephants
Wildlife Conservation Society

The most comprehensive survey conducted of elephant numbers in the Central African nation of Gabon since the late 1980s has found elephants occurring in higher numbers than previously thought.

Newswise: Decoding biological mysteries with algae: NAU team wins $3M from NSF to model microbiome
Released: 18-Nov-2021 10:05 AM EST
Decoding biological mysteries with algae: NAU team wins $3M from NSF to model microbiome
Northern Arizona University

The tiny cosmos of organisms living on a streamer of algae in a river could help scientists learn what turns an environment from healthy to toxic and back again. A multidisciplinary team led by NAU has won $3 million from the NSF to translate the codex contained in the microbiome of common algae into computer algorithms that can predict a wide range of microbial interactions.

Newswise: Speeding up the energy transition reduces climate risks
Released: 18-Nov-2021 3:05 AM EST
Speeding up the energy transition reduces climate risks
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The World Climate Conference in Glasgow has just ended. Empa researchers show how the energy transition could lead to the lowest possible cumulative emissions: Instead of slowly cutting back emissions, we should quickly push ahead with the conversion to solar energy and use fossil power plants at full capacity for one last time to do so.

Newswise: Fires in the Sierra Nevada likely to grow in frequency
Released: 17-Nov-2021 6:35 PM EST
Fires in the Sierra Nevada likely to grow in frequency
University of California, Irvine

Naturalist John Muir called the Sierra Nevada “the Range of Light.” But a more ominous nickname, “the Range of Fire,” may lie ahead, according to new research from the University of California, Irvine. By 2040, as humans continue to change the climate, fire-conducive heat waves will become so common that the number of blazes throughout the Sierra stands to increase about 50 percent, researchers found.

Newswise: Back down to earth
Released: 17-Nov-2021 5:45 PM EST
Back down to earth
UC Berkeley College of Engineering

The humdrum task of garbage-sorting can elicit confusion or even suspicion. Compost? Recycle? Are those corn-based disposable forks truly compostable or are they just feel-good trash? Many recyclable plastics never even make it into the right bin, and while products with terms like “eco” and “plant-derived” in their brand names can let us feel like we are making Earth-friendly choices, scientists say their benefits may be oversold.

Newswise: Alien organisms – hitchhikers of the galaxy?
16-Nov-2021 11:30 PM EST
Alien organisms – hitchhikers of the galaxy?
University of Adelaide

Scientists warn, without good biosecurity measures ‘alien organisms’ on Earth may become a reality stranger than fiction. Scientists warn, without good biosecurity measures ‘alien organisms’ on Earth may become a reality stranger than fiction.

Newswise: Flowering plants: an evolution revolution
Released: 17-Nov-2021 4:05 AM EST
Flowering plants: an evolution revolution
University of Bristol

Researchers at the University of Bristol have identified the huge impact of flowering plants on the evolution of life on Earth.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 3:35 PM EST
Climate and agriculture in the Mediterranean: less water resource, more irrigation demand
CMCC Foundation - Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change

Worsening climate conditions are expected to threaten water supplies in the Mediterranean region and its agricultural systems, which rely extensively on irrigation.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 10:25 AM EST
First-of-Its-Kind Augmented Reality Game Created at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Raises Awareness of Harmful Algae Blooms
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Eco Resilience Games from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has released the first augmented reality (AR) game focusing on the growing issue of harmful algae blooms.

Newswise: Research in Brief: First-Ever Interior Earth Mineral Discovered in Nature
Released: 15-Nov-2021 3:35 PM EST
Research in Brief: First-Ever Interior Earth Mineral Discovered in Nature
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV geochemists have discovered a new mineral on the surface of the Earth. Coined "davemaoite" and entrapped in a diamond, the mineral traveled from a depth of at least 410 miles deep within the Earth's lower mantle.

Newswise: Climate change impact on Earth’s ‘life zones’ on track to accelerate
Released: 15-Nov-2021 12:35 PM EST
Climate change impact on Earth’s ‘life zones’ on track to accelerate
University of Queensland

Scientists have revealed that climate change has already impacted all of Earth’s ‘life zones’ and the effects are set to triple under business-as-usual emissions growth.

Released: 15-Nov-2021 10:40 AM EST
Larger conservation areas didn’t protect animals in central Africa
Ohio State University

Efforts to protect threatened and endangered species in central Africa might be more successful if they focused on a smaller geographic area, new research suggests.

Newswise: Climate change will destroy familiar environments, create new ones and undermine efforts to protect sea life
Released: 14-Nov-2021 12:55 AM EST
Climate change will destroy familiar environments, create new ones and undermine efforts to protect sea life
Oregon State University

Climate change is altering familiar conditions of the world’s oceans and creating new environments that could undermine efforts to protect sea life in the world’s largest marine protected areas, new research from Oregon State University shows.


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