Feature Channels: Environmental Science

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Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
University of Queensland

Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries.

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Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Well-off countries need trade to cut environmental woes
Michigan State University

International trade wins and losses don't just show up in the stock market, but also on a nation's environmental sustainability scores, a new study in Nature Sustainability shows.

Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Bat research critical to preventing next pandemic
Washington State University

The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has a likely connection to bats, and the next viral outbreak probably will too, unless scientists can quickly learn more about the thousands of viruses carried by one of the most diverse mammals on the planet.

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Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Parasite infestations revealed by tiny chicken backpacks
University of California, Riverside

Blood-feeding livestock mites can be detected with wearable sensor technology nicknamed "Fitbits for chickens."

Newswise:Video Embedded like-humans-beluga-whales-form-social-networks-beyond-family-ties
VIDEO
Released: 10-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Like Humans, Beluga Whales Form Social Networks Beyond Family Ties
Florida Atlantic University

A groundbreaking study is the first to analyze the relationship between group behaviors, group type, group dynamics, and kinship of beluga whales in 10 locations across the Arctic. Results show that not only do beluga whales regularly interact with close kin, including close maternal kin, they also frequently associate with more distantly related and unrelated individuals. Findings will improve the understanding of why some species are social, how individuals learn from group members and how animal cultures emerge.

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Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report in a study in the Geophysical Journal International.

Newswise: 237181_web.jpg
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Revealing winners & losers in projected future climates
Flinders University

New research reveals how winners & losers from climate change can be identified based on their ability to adapt to rising future temperatures.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Scientists may have found one path to a longer life
University of Southern California (USC)

Scientists at USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences may have found the beginnings of a path toward increasing human lifespan.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome
University of Copenhagen

he cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
FSU workshop on maize genome profiling leads to new study on corn flowering
Florida State University

A genomic mapping technique developed in part at Florida State University has played a crucial role in a new study aimed at understanding growth in corn, a major U.S. crop.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Farmers’ climate change conundrum: Low yields or revenue instability
Cornell University

Climate change will leave some farmers with a difficult conundrum, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and Washington State University: either risk more revenue volatility or live with a more predictable decrease in crop yields.

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Embargo will expire: 14-Jul-2020 7:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT

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Newswise: Study finds less impact from wildfire smoke on climate
Released: 9-Jul-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Study finds less impact from wildfire smoke on climate
Los Alamos National Laboratory

New research revealed that tiny, sunlight-absorbing particles in wildfire smoke may have less impact on climate than widely hypothesized because reactions as the plume mixes with clean air reduce its absorbing power and climate-warming effect.

Newswise: Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
8-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
Washington University in St. Louis

In a perspective article published July 9 in Science, a team of wildlife biologists, infectious disease experts, and others propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify – before the next pandemic emerges – animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease.

Newswise: A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
Released: 9-Jul-2020 1:45 PM EDT
A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
University of Delaware

Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites have now been found to have more energy available and a higher population turnover. Deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the material coming up from the bottom, which means that the seep could be supporting a larger amount of biomass than previously thought.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
University of Southern Denmark

Fish kills are a recurring phenomenon in lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. Often the kills are triggered by factors like an algae bloom, but now a new study reports on a new, climate-related cause of fish kills.

Newswise: 237008_web.jpg
Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
University of York

A PhD student has produced the first digital reconstruction of the skull of a gigantic dormouse, which roamed the island of Sicily around two million years ago.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
McGill University

A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work.

Newswise: Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
Argonne National Laboratory

DOE and USDA researchers use new global models to study how environmental controllers affect soil organic carbon, changes in which can alter atmospheric carbon concentrations and affect climate. Predictions could benefit industry mitigation plans.

Newswise: NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Nova Southeastern University

As the planet’s land-based natural resources become exhausted, the need for new sources is bringing the search to the deepest parts of the world’s oceans. And that has researchers across the globe very concerned.

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Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT

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Newswise: Water-Saving Alternative Forage Crops for Texas Livestock
Released: 9-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Water-Saving Alternative Forage Crops for Texas Livestock
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

With increasing drought conditions in the Texas High Plains, researchers test sorghum and pearl millet as alternatives to corn

Newswise: Biodiversity Research Institute Announces First Successful Loon Nesting in Southern Massachusetts in a Century
Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Biodiversity Research Institute Announces First Successful Loon Nesting in Southern Massachusetts in a Century
Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Biodiversity Research Institute announces the successful results of its long-term loon translocation and restoration project Restore the Call: A male loon chick that was translocated in 2015 from New York to Massachusetts returned in 2018 to the region from which it fledged, and now has formed a territorial pair, nested, and successfully hatched a chick in Fall River, Massachusetts.

Newswise: hx0P1PiGF9Q9ctXQSMZG6ht_sDflx5IQZlg5kGRzrDZYmNQjzPZjMg0vITipMRQubUI1dublFtAyRyLo0gGg7afJimDrdGt5vOcgCY_D9TcSELPtuMJhcJMug2nvXg0dI1m5lBzMQDo7hj1-kSx-PoLTOI02pG3uWuyQHG-7Vjk-z4NAkdGWh_lWM_8siGidZo-f7pBSO8Ffn3wBEi4=s0-
2-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Fossil jawbone from Alaska is a rare case of a juvenile Arctic dromaeosaurid dinosaur
PLOS

A small piece of fossil jawbone from Alaska represents a rare example of juvenile dromaeosaurid dinosaur remains from the Arctic, according to a study published July 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alfio Alessandro Chiarenza of the Imperial College London, UK, and co-authors Anthony R. Fiorillo, Ronald S. Tykoski, Paul J. McCarthy, Peter P. Flaig, and Dori L. Contreras.

Newswise: 236840_web.jpg
Released: 8-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
New study detects ringing of the global atmosphere
University of Hawaii at Manoa

A ringing bell vibrates simultaneously at a low-pitched fundamental tone and at many higher-pitched overtones, producing a pleasant musical sound.

Newswise: 236579_web.jpg
Released: 8-Jul-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
RIKEN

Spiders produce amazingly strong and lightweight threads called draglines that are made from silk proteins.

Newswise: 236814_web.jpg
Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?
Rice University

Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the final 25 years of this century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008's Ike compared with slow-movers like 2017's Harvey, according to new research.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Applying rock dust to croplands could absorb up to 2 billion tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere, research shows
University of Sheffield

Major new study shows adding rock dust to farmland could remove carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent to more than the current total emissions from global aviation and shipping combined - or around half of Europe’s current total emissions

Newswise: Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States.

Newswise: 236720_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Newswise: Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
University of Utah

Ornithologists at the University of Utah say that community science bird data shows different trends in bird populations than professional bird surveys do, especially in developing countries. More observations are needed, the researchers say, both by birders and professionals.

Newswise: 236726_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
A chemical cocktail of air pollution in Beijing, China during COVID-19 outbreak
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spreads rapidly around the world, and has limited people's outdoor activities substantially.

Newswise: 236748_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tree rings show unprecedented rise in extreme weather in South America
Earth Institute at Columbia University

Scientists have filled a gaping hole in the world's climate records by reconstructing 600 years of soil-moisture swings across southern and central South America.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
New Research Reveals Regulatory Features Of The Maize Genome During Early Reproductive Development
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

A team of researchers led by Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, has mapped out the non-coding, ‘functional’ genome in maize during an early developmental window critical to formation of pollen-bearing tassels and grain-bearing ears.

Newswise: How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

How can some of world’s biggest problems – climate change, food security and land degradation – be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Global Change Biology.

Newswise: Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
DePaul University

A new study published in the journal New Phytologist from a research team led by environmental scientist Bala Chaudhary at DePaul University uncovered previously undiscovered patterns in the dispersal of mycorrhizal fungi that could help ecologists understand how these beneficial fungi travel.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
York University

What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB), also known as killer bees, to be highly defensive and aggressive? York University researchers have found it was the mixing of African and European genetics that led to hyper-aggression in this invasive strain of honey bees.

Newswise: 236475_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Palm trees most abundant in American rainforests
Uppsala University

Characteristics of palm trees differ from those of other tropical trees in many ways.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Simulations shows magnetic field can change 10 times faster than previously thought
University of Leeds

A new study by the University of Leeds and University of California at San Diego reveals that changes in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field may take place 10 times faster than previously thought.

Newswise: Newly discovered pathogen in NY apples causes bitter rot disease
Released: 6-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Newly discovered pathogen in NY apples causes bitter rot disease
Cornell University

In a study of New York state apple orchards, Cornell University plant pathologists have identified a new fungal pathogen that causes bitter rot disease in apples.

Newswise: 236561_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Coconut confusion reveals consumer conundrum
University of Exeter

Coconut oil production may be more damaging to the environment than palm oil, researchers say.

Newswise: Greenhouse gas and particulate pollution emissions drive regional drying around the globe
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Greenhouse gas and particulate pollution emissions drive regional drying around the globe
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Despite devastating impacts of drought on human and natural systems, the reasons why long-term regional drying occurs remain poorly understood. Research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have identified two signatures or “fingerprints” that explain why arid conditions are spreading worldwide, and why the Western United States has tended towards drought conditions since the 1980s while the African Sahel has recovered from its prolonged drought. The research appears in the July 6 edition of Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: 236608_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Why it's no last orders for the Tequila bat
University of Bristol

Native to the Americas, the tequila bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) lives in caves in some of the hottest desert areas in Mexico.

3-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Nitrogen Pollution Policies Around the World Lag Behind Scientific Knowledge, New Analysis Finds
New York University

National and regional policies aimed at addressing pollution fueled by nitrogen lag behind scientific knowledge of the problem, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers.


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