Feature Channels: Environmental Science

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jun-2021 12:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Jun-2021 3:00 PM EDT

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Newswise: Free Online Video Series Open to the Public ‘Understanding Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida’
Released: 14-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Free Online Video Series Open to the Public ‘Understanding Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida’
Florida Atlantic University

The free online series of short videos are designed to provide basic, jargon-free scientific information on harmful algal blooms: what they are; where they live and grow; and causes, impacts, and potential mitigation of blooms. The series is directed toward resource managers and decision-makers as well as the general public.

14-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Making a Meal of DNA in the Seafloor
University of Vienna

While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 4:05 AM EDT
Trees, Plants and Soil Could Help Cities Cut Their Carbon Footprints — When Used Smartly
Aalto University

Carbon footprint declarations are used in construction to ease product selection for low carbon building, but these standards don’t yet exist for green elements like soil, bushes and plants. A new study led by Aalto University is the first to map out how green infrastructure can be a resource for cities on the path to carbon neutrality.

Newswise: Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
Released: 10-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
University of Washington

Endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. The results provide insight into a poorly studied population and suggest conservation measures should include this region.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
The survivability of animal species depends on the number of offspring
Tel Aviv University

Researchers from Tel Aviv University took part in a new international study proposing an amendment to the widely accepted theory on the extinction of animal species - by moving the focus from the animal's body size to its reproductive capacity.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Artificial light harming clownfish
University of Melbourne

Young clownfish living closest to shore are dying faster than those further offshore because they are being exposed to artificial lighting, says an international research team.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Improved climate resilience through better seasonal forecasts
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Lack of water, floods, or crop losses: As a result of climate change, pronounced periods of drought and rainfall are occurring more frequently and more intensively all around the world, causing human suffering and major economic damage.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 16-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jun-2021 11:30 AM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 16-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jun-2021 11:25 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 16-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Decisions, Decisions: Climate Change and Water
Released: 10-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Decisions, Decisions: Climate Change and Water
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL’s Framework for Assessment of Complex Environmental Tradeoffs (FACET) is designed to navigate and rigorously evaluate competing environmental, economic, and social impacts to help make decisions more equitable. In an example scenario prepared using publicly available data, FACET was applied to predict tradeoffs facing the Colorado River and to balance competing demands of river flow and temperature, along with withdrawals for cities, crop irrigation, and power generation.

Newswise: Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Released: 10-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Newswise Trends

Checkout how sea is degraded with plastic and impact of pollution on land and sea.

Newswise: Soot Particles Vary in How They Soak Up the Sun
Released: 9-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Soot Particles Vary in How They Soak Up the Sun
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Soot in the atmosphere absorbs sunlight, warming the Earth’s atmosphere. This analysis shows that soot particles’ shape and composition can vary significantly. This creates discrepancies between real-world observations and predictions from models. This research used measurement and modeling to provide a framework that explains variation in atmospheric soot.

Newswise: Key to Cleaner Combustion? Look to the Stars
Released: 9-Jun-2021 4:25 AM EDT
Key to Cleaner Combustion? Look to the Stars
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

In a decade-long quest, scientists at Berkeley Lab, the University of Hawaii, and Florida International University uncover new clues to the origins of the universe – and land new chemistry for cleaner combustion engines

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Released: 8-Jun-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Tree diversity may save the forest: Advocating for biodiversity to mitigate climate change
Yokohama National University

When it comes to climate change, policymakers may fail to see the trees for the forest. Turns out that the trees may be the answer after all, according to a study published by authors from more than seven countries on June 3rd in Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: Laser-focused on Supercooled Water
Released: 8-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Laser-focused on Supercooled Water
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL’s infrared pulsed heating technique reveals supercooled water’s weird behavior; opens door to other fluid studies at new Energy Sciences Center.

Newswise: First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Released: 8-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

June 8, 2021 -- The first-ever global statistical analysis of trends in harmful algal blooms (HABs) has shown that, worldwide, there is no significant increase in HABs events, but that in some regions, events that include toxic species of algae affecting humans and wildlife are on the rise. In addition, the study finds that human activity, primarily aquaculture in coastal waters, and the economic impacts that HABs event cause to the fast-growing growing industry, is likely behind the perceived increase.

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Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Sea Turtle Week: FSU Marine Biologist Available to Comment on Importance of these Keystone Species
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: June 7, 2021 | 2:14 pm | SHARE: Sea turtles have existed on Earth for more than 100 million years.But today, most species of these oceangoing reptiles are threatened or endangered. Scientists and resource managers are working to better understand and manage their populations, and they’re using work like that led by Mariana Fuentes, an associate professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science at Florida State University.

Newswise: Why arctic soil can go slip-sliding away
Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Why arctic soil can go slip-sliding away
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Slow-moving arctic soils form patterns that, from a distance, resemble those found in common fluids such as drips in paint and birthday cake icing.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Darkened Windows Save Migrating Birds
Cornell University

Building lights are a deadly lure for the billions of birds that migrate at night, disrupting their natural navigation cues and leading to deadly collisions. But even if you can’t turn out all the lights in a building, darkening even some windows at night during bird migration periods could be a major lifesaver for birds.

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Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Antarctica: How have temperatures varied since the last glacial period?
CNRS (Centre National de Recherche Scientifique / National Center of Scientific Research)

Scientists have established the most reliable estimates to date of past temperature variations in Antarctica.

Newswise: New study shows a few common bacteria account for majority of carbon use in soil
Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
New study shows a few common bacteria account for majority of carbon use in soil
Northern Arizona University

Just a few bacterial taxa found in ecosystems across the planet are responsible for more than half of carbon cycling in soils, according to new findingsfrom researchers at Northern Arizona University.

Newswise: Papers Explore Massive Plankton Blooms with Very Different Ecosystem Impacts
Released: 7-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Papers Explore Massive Plankton Blooms with Very Different Ecosystem Impacts
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Two new papers explore this question and provide examples of conditions that lead to massive plankton blooms with vastly different potential impacts on the ecosystem, according to McGillicuddy, co-author of both papers. Both papers also point to importance of using advanced technology—including Video Plankton Recorders, autonomous underwater vehicles, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative’s Coastal Pioneer Array—to find and monitor these blooms.

Newswise: New invasive fish discovered, threatening waters of southern United States
Released: 7-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
New invasive fish discovered, threatening waters of southern United States
Case Western Reserve University

The discovery of the Lowland Cichlid (Herichthys carpintis) spells bad news for natural-resource managers and conservationists already contending with the Rio Grande Cichlid, especially in Louisiana.

Newswise: African Great Apes Predicted to Suffer Massive Range Declines in the Next 30 Years, with the Greatest Loss in Unprotected Areas
Released: 7-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
African Great Apes Predicted to Suffer Massive Range Declines in the Next 30 Years, with the Greatest Loss in Unprotected Areas
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study published in the journal Diversity and Distributions predicts massive range declines of Africa’s great apes – gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos – due to the impacts of climate change, land-use changes and human population growth.

Newswise: Sea snakes show their sensitive side to court potential mates
Released: 7-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Sea snakes show their sensitive side to court potential mates
University of Adelaide

Decades of research has revealed the remarkable morphological adaptations of sea snakes to aquatic life, which include paddle-shaped tails, salt-excreting glands, and the ability to breathe through their skin. In a new study published in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers at the University of Adelaide detail the enlarged touch receptors that evolved in male turtle-headed sea snakes (Emydocephalus annulatus), to help them locate and court females in aquatic environments.

Newswise: Conserving coastal seaweed: a must have for migrating sea birds
Released: 6-Jun-2021 8:05 PM EDT
Conserving coastal seaweed: a must have for migrating sea birds
University of South Australia

As Australia officially enters winter, UniSA ecologists are urging coastal communities to embrace all that the season brings, including the sometimes-unwelcome deposits of brown seaweed that can accumulate on the southern shores.

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Released: 4-Jun-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Songbirds can control single vocal muscle fibers when singing
University of Southern Denmark

The melodic and diverse songs of birds frequently inspire pop songs and poems, and have been for centuries, all the way back to Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" or "The Nightingale" by H.C. Andersen.

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Released: 4-Jun-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Corals tell Arabian Sea story of global warming
Hokkaido University

Coral insights into 1,000 years of seasonal changes in the Arabian Sea warn of significant impacts caused by global warming.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Geologist identifies new form of quasicrystal
University of Massachusetts, Lowell

A UMass Lowell geologist is among the researchers who have discovered a new type of manmade quasicrystal created by the first test blast of an atomic bomb.

Newswise: CO2 Emissions Are Rebounding, but Clean Energy Revolutions are Emerging
Released: 3-Jun-2021 9:05 PM EDT
CO2 Emissions Are Rebounding, but Clean Energy Revolutions are Emerging
University of California San Diego

At the upcoming Conference of the Parties (COP26) in November, ample discussion is likely to focus on how the world is not on track to meet the Paris Agreement’s goals of stopping warming at well below 2°C. According to a new University of California San Diego article published in Nature Energy, world diplomats will, however, find encouraging signs in emerging clean energy technology “niches”—countries, states or corporations—that are pioneering decarbonization.

Newswise: If Countries Implement Paris Pledges with Cuts to Aerosols, Millions of Lives can be Saved
Released: 3-Jun-2021 9:05 PM EDT
If Countries Implement Paris Pledges with Cuts to Aerosols, Millions of Lives can be Saved
University of California San Diego

Aerosol reductions that would take place as countries meet climate goals could contribute to global cooling and prevent more than one million annual premature deaths over a decade, according to a new study from the University of California San Diego.

Newswise: Single gene boosts climate resilience, yield and carbon capture in crops
Released: 3-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Single gene boosts climate resilience, yield and carbon capture in crops
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered a single gene that simultaneously boosts plant growth and tolerance for stresses such as drought and salt, all while tackling the root cause of climate change by enabling plants to pull more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Newswise: Argonne demonstrates benefits of restoring native vegetation at solar facilities
Released: 3-Jun-2021 5:35 PM EDT
Argonne demonstrates benefits of restoring native vegetation at solar facilities
Argonne National Laboratory

Modeling different land use types, Argonne researchers demonstrate that the growth of native grasslands on large solar utility sites can help restore biodiversity, maintain ecosystem services and aid agriculture.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Record-breaking temperatures more likely in populated tropics
University of Arizona

Icebergs crumbling into the sea may be what first come to mind when imagining the most dramatic effects of global warming.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Study confirms invasive lionfish now threaten species along Brazilian coast
California Academy of Sciences

Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems--particularly coral reefs--from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands.

Newswise: South Pole and East Antarctica warmer than previously thought during last ice age, two studies show
Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:50 PM EDT
South Pole and East Antarctica warmer than previously thought during last ice age, two studies show
University of Washington

University of Washington glaciologists are co-authors on two papers that analyzed Antarctic ice cores to understand the continent’s air temperatures during the most recent glacial period. The results help understand how the region behaves during a major climate transition.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Solar energy and pollinator conservation: A path for real impact?
Entomological Society of America (ESA)

Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen.

Newswise: UW researchers investigate mining-related deforestation in the Amazon
Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
UW researchers investigate mining-related deforestation in the Amazon
University of Wisconsin-Madison

If you’re wearing gold jewelry right now, there’s a good chance it came from an illegal mining operation in the tropics and surfaced only after some rainforest was sacrificed, according to a team of University of Wisconsin researchers who studied regulatory efforts to curb some of these environmentally damaging activities.

Newswise: Global climate trend since Dec. 1 1978: +0.14 C per decade
Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Global climate trend since Dec. 1 1978: +0.14 C per decade
University of Alabama Huntsville

Global Temperature Report: May 2021 (New Reference Base, 1991-2020)

Released: 3-Jun-2021 10:25 AM EDT
UNH Research: Black Bears May Play Important Role in Protecting Gray Fox
University of New Hampshire

Bears are known for being devoted and protective of their baby cubs, but research from the University of New Hampshire shows that they may also play a significant role in shielding gray fox from predators like coyotes, who compete with the fox for food and space. The research is one of the first studies to show how black bears provide a buffer to allow other, smaller carnivores to safely co-exist.

Newswise:Video Embedded mangrove-root-model-may-hold-the-key-to-preventing-coastal-erosion
VIDEO
Released: 3-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Mangrove Root Model May Hold the Key to Preventing Coastal Erosion
Florida Atlantic University

How mangrove roots interact with water flow is believed to be a key element in mitigating coastal erosion. Researchers are the first to quantify the optimal mangrove root hydrodynamic with a predictive model, which provides insight into the sediment transport and erosion processes that govern the evolution of the shapes of shorelines. Results can provide useful guidance for coastal managers restoring estuarine mangrove forests or planting mangroves as part of living shoreline stabilization.

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Released: 2-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Study pinpoints key causes of ocean circulation change
University of Exeter

Researchers have identified the key factors that influence a vital pattern of ocean currents.

Newswise: World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Released: 2-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Oxygen levels in the world’s temperate freshwater lakes are declining rapidly — faster than in the oceans — a trend driven largely by climate change that threatens freshwater biodiversity and drinking water quality.

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Released: 2-Jun-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Young T. rexes had a powerful bite, capable of exerting one-sixth the force of an adult
University of California, Berkeley

Jack Tseng loves bone-crunching animals -- hyenas are his favorite -- so when paleontologist Joseph Peterson discovered fossilized dinosaur bones that had teeth marks from a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex, Tseng decided to try to replicate the bite marks and measure how hard those kids could actually chomp down.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Assessing the feasibility of transformation pathways for achieving the Paris Climate Agreement
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

What drives the feasibility of climate scenarios commonly reviewed by organizations like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)? And can they actually be achieved in practice? A new systematic framework can help understand what to improve in the next generation of scenarios and explore how to make ambitious emission reductions possible by strengthening enabling conditions.


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