Feature Channels: Environmental Science

Filters close
Newswise: UNC’s Entrepreneurial Challenge Helps Student Back Eco-Friendly Fashion in Thrifty Way
Released: 29-Nov-2022 12:15 PM EST
UNC’s Entrepreneurial Challenge Helps Student Back Eco-Friendly Fashion in Thrifty Way
University of Northern Colorado

Kennedy Dechant, a sophomore Environmental and Sustainability Studies major at the University of Northern Colorado, never imagined that she would one day be running her own business. Now the owner of the online thrift store, Eclecticism, her business began as a website she created for her web design class in high school.

Released: 29-Nov-2022 11:35 AM EST
Marine cyanobacteria grew strong in the ocean by adjusting their metabolism
University of Cordoba

The UCO publishes a review of the nitrogen metabolism adaptations that allowed the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth, marine cyanobacteria, to survive in environments very poor in nutrients.

Newswise: Cooling Down Solar Cells, Naturally
22-Nov-2022 3:10 PM EST
Cooling Down Solar Cells, Naturally
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Too much sun and too much heat can reduce the efficiency of photovoltaics. A solar farm with optimally spaced panels facing the correct direction could cool itself through convection using the surrounding wind. Researchers explored how to exploit the geometry of solar farms to enhance natural cooling mechanisms.

Newswise: Microphytobenthos in the Dutch Wadden Sea feeds on ‘left-overs’ in the bottom
Released: 29-Nov-2022 10:05 AM EST
Microphytobenthos in the Dutch Wadden Sea feeds on ‘left-overs’ in the bottom
Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research

For the study, Riekenberg and colleagues looked at the chemical variations in the isotopes of nitrogen. There are two predominate forms of nitrogen, 'nitrogen-14' and the heavier version, 'nitrogen-15'.

Newswise: Chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Released: 29-Nov-2022 8:00 AM EST
Chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Next week the UN intergovernmental negotiating committee (INC) on plastic pollution will meet in Uruguay to develop an international legally binding instrument against plastic pollution. There is concern among scientists that the negotiations will overlook the diversity and complexity of chemicals present in plastics. This would severely undermine the treaty’s effectiveness, according to a new study published in the recent issue of the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 8:10 PM EST
Media Availability: UNH British Historian to Comment on Royal Visit to Boston
University of New Hampshire

Prince William and Kate Middleton are both expected to make the trip across the pond for the second annual Earthshot Prize ceremony which will be held in Boston. Nicoletta Gullace, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, and an expert on the royal family, is available to talk about the significance of the trip and what this means for the monarchy as well as for the city of Boston.

Newswise: Biodiversity in Africa and Latin America at risk from oil palm expansion, new report warns
Released: 28-Nov-2022 7:40 PM EST
Biodiversity in Africa and Latin America at risk from oil palm expansion, new report warns
University of York

Zero deforestation commitments may inadvertently leave vital habitats in Latin America and Africa vulnerable to agricultural expansion, a new study has found.

Newswise: Mangroves: environmental guardians of our coastline
Released: 28-Nov-2022 7:20 PM EST
Mangroves: environmental guardians of our coastline
University of South Australia

They are the salt-tolerant shrubs that thrive in the toughest of conditions, but according to new UniSA research, mangroves are also avid coastal protectors, capable of surviving in heavy metal contaminated environments.

Newswise: Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Released: 28-Nov-2022 4:35 PM EST
Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Northern Arizona University

A recent study co-authored by associate professor Matthew Bowker found important connections between grazing pressure on drylands and the ecosystem services they provide. 

Newswise: Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:05 PM EST
Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Northern peatlands contain one third of the Earth’s soil carbon, making them important for carbon storage. In northern peatlands, carbon losses from soil during the winter can exceed carbon storage during the warm growing season, primarily because of the activity of microbes. To better understand how microbes interact in peatland soils during the winter months, this study incubated Arctic peat soils under winter conditions, then analyzed the microbes to understand how the microbes released carbon dioxide.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-swimming-habits-of-gelatinous-animals-are-inspiring-underwater-vehicle-design
VIDEO
22-Nov-2022 6:05 PM EST
The swimming habits of gelatinous animals are inspiring underwater vehicle design
University of Oregon

Two different swimming styles of a marine animal related to jellyfish let the animal prioritize speed or energy efficiency, depending on its current needs, a team of University of Oregon researchers found. The UO team, led by marine biologist Kelly Sutherland and postdoctoral researcher Kevin Du Clos, report their findings in a paper published Nov. 28 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:35 PM EST
What Ancient Underwater Food Webs Can Tell Us About the Future of Climate Change
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV analysis challenges the idea that ocean ecosystems have barely changed over millions of years, pointing scientists down a new path on conservation efforts and policy.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EST
Researchers take first step towards controlling photosynthesis using mirrors
Lund University

With the help of mirrors, placed only a few hundred nanometers apart, a research team has managed to use light more efficiently.

Newswise: Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM) - CSIC

A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), with colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Oceanology, the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Gdańsk have also participated has revealed that global warming and ocean acidification threaten marine organisms that build their skeletons and shells with calcium carbonate (chalk) such as corals, bryozoans, molluscs, sea urchins or crustaceans.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:05 PM EST
Drugs from plastic waste
Wiley

Plastic waste is one of the most significant ecological and economic problems of our time.

Newswise: Earth’s many new lakes
Released: 28-Nov-2022 11:40 AM EST
Earth’s many new lakes
University of Copenhagen

The number of lakes on our planet has increased substantially in recent decades, according to a unique global survey of 3.4 million lakes that the University of Copenhagen has taken part in.

Newswise: A life-inspired system dynamically adjusts to its environment
24-Nov-2022 7:00 AM EST
A life-inspired system dynamically adjusts to its environment
Aalto University

The system regulates its own temperature in response to environmental disturbances

Newswise: When cyclones and fires collide…
Released: 27-Nov-2022 8:05 PM EST
When cyclones and fires collide…
University of South Australia

As strong winds and torrential rains inundate Australia’s south-eastern coast, new research suggests that high intensity bushfires might not be too far behind, with their dual effects extending damage zones and encroaching on previously low-risk residential areas.

Newswise: Synthetic fibers discovered in Antarctic air, seawater, sediment and sea ice as the ‘pristine’ continent becomes a sink for plastic pollution
Released: 23-Nov-2022 4:40 PM EST
Synthetic fibers discovered in Antarctic air, seawater, sediment and sea ice as the ‘pristine’ continent becomes a sink for plastic pollution
University of Oxford

As nations meet in Uruguay to negotiate a new Global Plastics Treaty, marine and forensic scientists publish new results this week that reveal the discovery of synthetic plastic fibres in air, seawater, sediment and sea ice sampled in the Antarctic Weddell Sea.

Newswise: Plants employ chemical engineering to manufacture bee-luring optical devices
Released: 23-Nov-2022 4:05 PM EST
Plants employ chemical engineering to manufacture bee-luring optical devices
University of Cambridge

While most flowers produce pigments that appear colourful and act as a visual cue to pollinators, some flowers also create microscopic three-dimensional patterns on their petal surfaces.

Newswise: Tracking Explosions with Toughened-Up Tracers
Released: 23-Nov-2022 3:35 PM EST
Tracking Explosions with Toughened-Up Tracers
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL researchers created rugged, adaptable, mass-manufacturable luminescent particle tracers for use in harsh environments.

Newswise: For Grassland Soil Viruses, Precipitation Shapes Diversity, Abundance, and Function
Released: 23-Nov-2022 7:05 AM EST
For Grassland Soil Viruses, Precipitation Shapes Diversity, Abundance, and Function
Department of Energy, Office of Science

As precipitation patterns shift in response to climate change, scientists must understand how this change affects soil viruses. In this study, scientists analyzed DNA viruses in three grassland soils with different historical precipitation patterns: low precipitation from eastern Washington, intermediate precipitation from Kansas, and high precipitation from Iowa. The researchers found that viruses were more diverse and more common in drier soil.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 7:15 PM EST
Scientists say chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Green Science Policy Institute

Next week the United Nations intergovernmental negotiating committee to develop an international legally binding instrument on plastic pollution will meet in Uruguay.

Newswise: Large parts of Europe are warming twice as fast as the planet on average
Released: 22-Nov-2022 7:00 PM EST
Large parts of Europe are warming twice as fast as the planet on average
Stockholm University

The warming during the summer months in Europe has been much faster than the global average, shows a new study by researchers at Stockholm University published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres.

Newswise: Samples.jpg
Released: 22-Nov-2022 5:55 PM EST
FSU researchers find decrease in crucial trace element preceded ancient mass extinction
Florida State University

A decline in the element molybdenum across the planet’s oceans preceded a significant extinction event approximately 183 million years ago, new research from Florida State University shows.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
This news release is embargoed until 29-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 22-Nov-2022 12:15 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Tibetan bottom ice might be younger than previously believed by two orders of magnitude
Released: 22-Nov-2022 11:55 AM EST
Tibetan bottom ice might be younger than previously believed by two orders of magnitude
Science China Press

From September to October of 2015, a 60-person team were gathering on the Guliya ice cap in the Kunlun Mountains of the Tibetan Plateau, with the purpose to retrieve the world’s oldest ice.

Newswise: Limiting Global Warming Now Can Preserve Valuable Freshwater Resource
Released: 22-Nov-2022 10:00 AM EST
Limiting Global Warming Now Can Preserve Valuable Freshwater Resource
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers say that the Chilean Andes could face marked snow loss and roughly 10% less mountain water runoff with a global warming of approximately 2.5 degrees Celsius over the next 30 years. The study has implications for the California Sierra Nevada and highlights the need for carbon mitigation.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 8:50 AM EST
Three days to help save our coastal habitats
University of Portsmouth

A global gathering of marine scientists has set a three-day symposium to work out how we can maximise the many life and planet protecting services we as humans benefit from our coastal habitats.

Newswise: Arctic carbon conveyor belt discovered
Released: 21-Nov-2022 4:50 PM EST
Arctic carbon conveyor belt discovered
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research

Every year, the cross-shelf transport of carbon-rich particles from the Barents and Kara Seas could bind up to 3.6 million metric tons of CO2 in the Arctic deep sea for millennia.

Newswise: Electric pulses save sharks from fishing hooks
Released: 21-Nov-2022 2:45 PM EST
Electric pulses save sharks from fishing hooks
University of Exeter

Gadgets that emit small electrical pulses can drastically cut the number of sharks and stingrays caught accidentally on fishing lines, new research shows.

Newswise: Monitoring “frothy” magma gases could help evade disaster
Released: 21-Nov-2022 12:55 PM EST
Monitoring “frothy” magma gases could help evade disaster
University of Tokyo

Volcanic eruptions are dangerous and difficult to predict. A team at the University of Tokyo has found that the ratio of atoms in specific gases released from volcanic fumaroles (gaps in the Earth’s surface) can provide an indicator of what is happening to the magma deep below — similar to taking a blood test to check your health.

Released: 18-Nov-2022 5:50 PM EST
Looking at oxygen storage dynamics in three-way catalysts
Tokyo Institute of Technology

In light of vehicular pollutants contributing to decreasing air quality, governments across the globe are posing stricter emission regulations for automobiles.

Newswise: Cultural heritage may influence choice of tools by capuchin monkeys, study suggests
Released: 18-Nov-2022 5:10 PM EST
Cultural heritage may influence choice of tools by capuchin monkeys, study suggests
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) are among only a few primates that use tools in day-to-day activities.

Released: 18-Nov-2022 5:05 PM EST
Sea level rise to dramatically speed up erosion of rock coastlines by 2100
Imperial College London

Rock coasts, which make up over half the world’s coastlines, could retreat more rapidly in the future due to accelerating sea level rise.

Newswise: What Darwin would discover today
Released: 18-Nov-2022 4:55 PM EST
What Darwin would discover today
University of Konstanz

"If Charles Darwin had had the opportunity to dive off the Cape Verde Islands, he would have been completely thrilled", Eduardo Sampaio is convinced, because Darwin would have seen a fascinating, species-rich landscape.

Newswise: Fieldwork_WEB.jpg
Released: 18-Nov-2022 3:35 PM EST
FSU researchers: Rapid fluctuations in oxygen levels coincided with Earth's first mass extinction
Florida State University

Rapid changes in marine oxygen levels may have played a significant role in driving Earth’s first mass extinction, according to a new study led by Florida State University researchers.

Released: 18-Nov-2022 11:45 AM EST
Study: Turning wastewater into fertilizer is feasible and could help to make agriculture more sustainable
Drexel University

The wastewater draining from massive pools of sewage sludge has the potential to play a role in more sustainable agriculture, according to environmental engineering researchers at Drexel University.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 8:15 PM EST
Research reveals plant roots change shape and branch out for water
University of Nottingham

Researchers have discovered how plant roots adapt their shape to maximise their uptake of water, pausing branching when they lose contact with water and only resuming once they reconnect with moisture, ensuring they can survive even in the driest conditions.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 5:50 PM EST
Salt more important than cold polar temperatures in sea ice formation
University of Gothenburg

When polar seas freeze and ice forms, it is not only due to cold air chilling the surface of the water.

Newswise:Video Embedded story-tips-genetic-markers-for-autism-hiding-in-plain-sight-recyclable-composites-help-drive-net-zero-goal-evaluating-buildings-in-real-time-nanoreactor-grows-hydrogen-storage-crystals
VIDEO
Released: 17-Nov-2022 2:15 PM EST
Story tips: Genetic markers for autism, hiding in plain sight; Recyclable composites help drive net-zero goal; Evaluating buildings in real time; Nanoreactor grows hydrogen-storage crystals
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Genetic markers for autism, hiding in plain sight; Recyclable composites help drive net-zero goal; Evaluating buildings in real time; Nanoreactor grows hydrogen-storage crystals

   
17-Nov-2022 3:05 AM EST
Finding equity in climate mitigation finance
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

A new study published in the journal Science helps inform the current negotiations at COP27 while keeping fairness at the forefront.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 1:15 PM EST
Vast phytoplankton blooms may be lurking beneath Antarctic ice
Frontiers

Until now, we thought the packed sea ice of the Southern Ocean blocked all light from reaching the sea beneath, preventing phytoplankton — tiny algae which are the base of aquatic food webs — from growing there.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 12:40 PM EST
Crown-of-thorns seastar from Red Sea is endemic species
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Munich)

Tropical coral reefs are among the most endangered ecosystems on Earth. In addition to climate change, coral-eating crown-of-thorns seastars (Acanthaster spp.) pose one of the biggest threats in parts of the Indo-Pacific region.

Newswise: Missouri S&T CO2 research is rock solid
Released: 17-Nov-2022 11:05 AM EST
Missouri S&T CO2 research is rock solid
Missouri University of Science and Technology

As climate change accelerates, scientists are investigating ways to lower carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.


Showing results

150 of 13011

close
2.76342