Feature Channels: Evolution and Darwin

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Released: 26-May-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Archaeology: First Pompeiian human genome sequenced
Scientific Reports

The first successfully sequenced human genome from an individual who died in Pompeii, Italy, after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE is presented this week in a study published in Scientific Reports.

Newswise: “Fuel of evolution” more abundant than previously thought in wild animals
Released: 26-May-2022 4:15 PM EDT
“Fuel of evolution” more abundant than previously thought in wild animals
Australian National University

The raw material for evolution is much more abundant in wild animals than we previously believed, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

Newswise: More reptile species may be at risk of extinction than previously thought
23-May-2022 11:10 AM EDT
More reptile species may be at risk of extinction than previously thought
PLOS

Machine learning tool estimates extinction risk for species previously unprioritized for conservation.

Newswise: Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Released: 25-May-2022 5:50 PM EDT
Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Field Museum

For decades, paleontologists have debated whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded, like modern mammals and birds, or cold-blooded, like modern reptiles.

Released: 25-May-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Children and Adolescents Can Walk Efficiently at the Same Pace as Adults
Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH)

Ana Mateos and Jesús Rodríguez, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have published an experimental energy study in the American Journal of Biological Anthropology, which shows that children and adolescents can walk at a speed close to the optimal pace for adults, with hardly any locomotion energy costs or departing from their own optimal speed.

Newswise: Snake, Lizard T Cell Mystery
Released: 25-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Snake, Lizard T Cell Mystery
Flinders University

The intriguing Australian sleepy lizard has raised new questions about vertebrate immunity after the surprise discovery of the evolutionary disappearance of genes needed for some T cell production in squamates.

Newswise: Some Monkeys Might Pull a Poker Face
Released: 25-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Some Monkeys Might Pull a Poker Face
Kyoto University

How could a human mother tell that her child is upset? Humans can distinguish the meanings of facial expressions of our fellow species either explicitly through speech or implicitly by context.

Newswise: Species Thrive Through Social Connections
Released: 25-May-2022 10:50 AM EDT
Species Thrive Through Social Connections
Kyoto University

The term biodiversity invites images of lush rainforests, dynamic estuaries, and other biomes where a kaleidoscope of species interact within their communities. We could assume the same holds true for biodiversity at the microscopic level.

Newswise: Skydiving salamanders live in world's tallest trees
Released: 23-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Skydiving salamanders live in world's tallest trees
University of California, Berkeley

Salamanders that live their entire lives in the crowns of the world's tallest trees, California's coast redwoods, have evolved a behavior well-adapted to the dangers of falling from high places: the ability to parachute, glide and maneuver in mid-air.

Newswise: A family of termites has been traversing the world’s oceans for millions of years
Released: 23-May-2022 12:25 PM EDT
A family of termites has been traversing the world’s oceans for millions of years
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University - OIST

A new study has mapped out the natural history of drywood termites—the second largest family of termites.

Newswise: Fly researchers find another layer to the code of life
Released: 19-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Fly researchers find another layer to the code of life
Duke University

A new examination of the way different tissues read information from genes has discovered that the brain and testes appear to be extraordinarily open to the use of many different kinds of code to produce a given protein.

Newswise: Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Released: 18-May-2022 6:10 PM EDT
Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Flinders University

What links a finger bone and some fossil teeth found in a cave in the remote Altai Mountains of Siberia to a single tooth found in a cave in the limestone landscapes of tropical Laos?

Newswise:Video Embedded study-finds-parrots-use-their-heads-as-a-third-limb
VIDEO
Released: 18-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Parrots Use Their Heads as a “Third Limb”
New York Institute of Technology, New York Tech

For the first time, researchers find that parrots climb by using their head as a third “limb.”

Newswise: Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Released: 17-May-2022 11:10 AM EDT
Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Humans are the only species on earth known to use language. We do this by combining sounds to form words and words to form hierarchically structured sentences.

Released: 17-May-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Early Earth: Tungsten isotopes in seawater provide insights into the co-evolution of Earth's mantle and continents
University of Vienna

In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, Andrea Mundl-Petermeier and Sebastian Viehmann of the Department of Lithospheric Research at the University of Vienna have demonstrated that a new geochemical archive - 182Tungsten in banded iron formations - can be used to simultaneously trace both the evolution of the Earth's mantle and continents throughout Earth’s history. This offers new opportunities to better understand the Precambrian Earth in the future.

Newswise: Discovered: 150-year-old platypus and echidna specimens that proved some mammals lay eggs
Released: 12-May-2022 3:35 PM EDT
Discovered: 150-year-old platypus and echidna specimens that proved some mammals lay eggs
University of Cambridge

Jars of tiny platypus and echidna specimens, collected in the late 1800s by the scientist William Caldwell, have been discovered in the stores of Cambridge’s University Museum of Zoology.

Released: 12-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Jellyfish’s Stinging Cells Hold Clues to Biodiversity
Cornell University

The cnidocytes – or stinging cells – that are characteristic of sea anemones, hydrae, corals and jellyfish, and make us careful of our feet while wading in the ocean, are also an excellent model for understanding the emergence of new cell types, according to new Cornell research.

Newswise: What Caused This Megatooth Shark’s Massive Toothache?
Released: 12-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
What Caused This Megatooth Shark’s Massive Toothache?
North Carolina State University

Did the world’s largest prehistoric shark need an orthodontist, or did it just have a bad lunch?

Newswise:Video Embedded from-cavefish-to-humans-evolution-of-metabolism-in-cavefish-may-provide-insight-into-treatments-for-a-host-of-diseases-such-as-diabetes-heart-disease-and-stroke
VIDEO
11-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
From Cavefish to Humans: Evolution of Metabolism in Cavefish May Provide Insight Into Treatments for a Host of Diseases Such as Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

New research examines how cavefish developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be applicable for humans.

Newswise: How Shark Teeth Can Decipher Evolutionary Processes
Released: 12-May-2022 4:05 AM EDT
How Shark Teeth Can Decipher Evolutionary Processes
University of Vienna

From embryo to turtle cracker: a team led by palaeobiologist Julia Türtscher from the University of Vienna studied the multiple changes in tooth shape in the tiger shark. The study, recently published in the Journal of Anatomy, is also central in drawing conclusions about extinct species from the myriad of preserved shark teeth in the field of palaeontology.

Newswise: Complex human childbirth and cognitive abilities a result of walking upright
Released: 10-May-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Complex human childbirth and cognitive abilities a result of walking upright
University of Zurich

During human birth, the fetus typically navigates a tight, convoluted birth canal by flexing and rotating its head at various stages.

Newswise: Brain Size Determined The Chances of Survival Among Large Animals
Released: 9-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Brain Size Determined The Chances of Survival Among Large Animals
Tel Aviv University

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, and the University of Naples, have examined the mass extinction of large animals over the past tens of thousands of years and found that extinct species had, on average, much smaller brains than species that survived.

Newswise:Video Embedded spider-can-hide-underwater-for-30-minutes
VIDEO
Released: 9-May-2022 12:00 AM EDT
Spider can hide underwater for 30 minutes
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A tropical spider species uses a “film” of air to hide underwater from predators for as long as 30 minutes, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: Critically endangered vaquita porpoise not doomed to extinction by inbreeding depression
Released: 6-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Critically endangered vaquita porpoise not doomed to extinction by inbreeding depression
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Unchecked gillnetting has pushed the world’s smallest porpoise to the brink of extinction: there are roughly 10 vaquitas remaining in the Gulf of California in Mexico.

Newswise: Squid and octopus genome studies reveal how cephalopods’ unique traits evolved
Released: 4-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Squid and octopus genome studies reveal how cephalopods’ unique traits evolved
Marine Biological Laboratory

Squid, octopus, and cuttlefish – even to scientists who study them – are wonderfully weird creatures.

Released: 3-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Dog Coronavirus Jumps to Humans, with a Protein Shift
Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have identified a shift that occurs in canine coronavirus that may provide clues as to how it transmits from animals to humans.

Newswise: Beetle Iridescence a Deceptive Form of Warning Coloration, Study Finds
Released: 3-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Beetle Iridescence a Deceptive Form of Warning Coloration, Study Finds
University of Bristol

A new study published today in Animal Behaviour shows for the first time that brilliant iridescence and gloss found in some animals can have a protective function by working as a form of deceptive warning colouration, and that it is the key feature of iridescence, its changing colours, that is important for this effect.

Newswise: Researchers discover overlooked Jurassic Park of lizards
Released: 3-May-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Researchers discover overlooked Jurassic Park of lizards
University of Bristol

New research published today in eLife by researchers from the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) and the University of Bristol (UB) moves back the moment of the radiation of squamates ―the group of reptiles that includes lizards, snakes and worm lizards― to the Jurassic, a long time before current estimates.

Newswise: Un Parque Jurásico de lagartos pasado por alto
Released: 3-May-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Un Parque Jurásico de lagartos pasado por alto
University of Bristol

Una nueva investigación publicada hoy en eLife por personal investigador del Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) y la Universidad de Bristol (UB) retrasa el momento de la radiación de los escamosos ―el grupo de reptiles que incluye lagartos, serpientes y lagartos gusanos― al Jurásico, mucho antes de las estimaciones hechas hasta el momento.

Newswise: Additions to Natural History Collections Declining
Released: 28-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Additions to Natural History Collections Declining
Cornell University

A new study from the Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates reveals that new additions of vertebrate specimens to natural history collections are declining precipitously. The authors suggest that it is vital to maintain collecting efforts in order to address future unforeseen ecological issues.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 5:10 PM EDT
Threatened South American coati found roaming in a large city
Pensoft Publishers

You may assume that metropolitan areas are devoid of wildlife, but that is very far from the truth.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Origin of complex cells started without oxygen
University of Exeter

The origin of complex cells started without oxygen, new research suggests.

Newswise: Ecotourism is having a negative effect on primate’s behaviour
Released: 26-Apr-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Ecotourism is having a negative effect on primate’s behaviour
University of Portsmouth

New research shows that the increase in primate ecotourism is having a negative effect on monkey’s behaviour. The study, led by the University of Portsmouth, found that this fast-growing tourism sector where tourists can conveniently reach primates via motor boats is causing stress-related behaviours in monkeys.

Newswise: Think fast! Clever monkeys plan their food trips to avoid stronger rivals
Released: 26-Apr-2022 4:05 AM EDT
Think fast! Clever monkeys plan their food trips to avoid stronger rivals
Frontiers

Vervet monkeys are quick and clever planners of the best route to follow on foraging trips, shows a new study.

Newswise: Jiminy's wings turned out as fine as his conscience
Released: 25-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Jiminy's wings turned out as fine as his conscience
Kyoto University

Three intercellular pathways in crickets signal the formation of dorsal wings.

Newswise: Discovery sheds light on why the Pacific islands were colonized
Released: 22-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Discovery sheds light on why the Pacific islands were colonized
Australian National University

The discovery of pottery from the ancient Lapita culture by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) has shed new light on how Papua New Guinea served as a launching pad for the colonisation of the Pacific – one of the greatest migrations in human history.

Newswise: Indiana Jones was right all along: Research shows the smaller the scorpion, the deadlier
Released: 21-Apr-2022 5:25 PM EDT
Indiana Jones was right all along: Research shows the smaller the scorpion, the deadlier
National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway)

Researchers in NUI Galway have shown, for the first time, that smaller species of scorpions, with smaller pincers, have more potent venoms compared to larger species with robust claws.

Newswise: Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
Released: 21-Apr-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
University College Cork

Flying reptiles could change the colour of their feathers, research finds.

Newswise: World’s New Stream Frog Found in Myanmar:  Chula Researcher Indicates Its Ecosystem Is Intact
Released: 21-Apr-2022 8:55 AM EDT
World’s New Stream Frog Found in Myanmar: Chula Researcher Indicates Its Ecosystem Is Intact
Chulalongkorn University

A biologist from the Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University working with researchers from Germany and Myanmar has discovered two of the world’s newest stream frogs in Myanmar highlighting the remaining diversity of ecosystems in Southeast Asia and cautions all those involved of the need to conserve our forests before our valuable wildlife become extinct.

Newswise: Brains and brawn helped crows and ravens take over the world
18-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Brains and brawn helped crows and ravens take over the world
Washington University in St. Louis

Crows and ravens are well known for their black color and the harsh “caw” sound they make. They are intelligent birds that use tools, solve complex abstract problems and speak a volume of words. But what is less well appreciated is how diverse they are. Their diversity is accompanied by their ability to live all over the world in a variety of habitats.

Newswise: Natural History Museum of Utah releases Triceratops Traits, a new investigation for middle school science classes
Released: 20-Apr-2022 1:10 PM EDT
Natural History Museum of Utah releases Triceratops Traits, a new investigation for middle school science classes
University of Utah

In Triceratops Traits, students work alongside paleontologists to solve an evolutionary mystery by analyzing and interpreting data from the fossil record under the premise that natural laws have operated the same throughout the history of life on Earth to fit 7th grade learning standards in Utah and 6th-8th grades around the U.S.

Newswise: Sonal Singhal's Speciation Research Among Top 25 Works by Women Authors
Released: 18-Apr-2022 7:05 PM EDT
Sonal Singhal's Speciation Research Among Top 25 Works by Women Authors
California State University, Dominguez Hills

CSUDH Associate Professor of Biology Sonal Singhal's 2011 paper about lizard species was recognized by Evolution, the Society for the Study of Evolution's prestigious international journal.

Newswise: A population Hub out of Africa explains East Asian lineages in Europe 45.000 years ago
Released: 7-Apr-2022 1:00 PM EDT
A population Hub out of Africa explains East Asian lineages in Europe 45.000 years ago
Universita di Bologna

The ancient human remains unearthed in the Bacho Kiro cave (in present-day Bulgaria) and recently genetically described were surprisingly reported to be more closely related to contemporary East Asians than contemporary Europeans.

Newswise: Squid recorded color-matching substrate for the first time
Released: 5-Apr-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Squid recorded color-matching substrate for the first time
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University - OIST

While octopus and cuttlefish are famous for their use of camouflage to match the color of the substrate, a third type of cephalopod—the squid—has never been reported displaying this ability.

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Study Reveals the Science Behind Those Irresistible Puppy-Dog Eyes
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Can’t resist your pup’s adoring expression when he begs for a treat? A new study reveals key anatomical features that could explain what makes dogs’ faces so appealing. The findings also suggest that humans contributed to dogs’ ability to form facial expressions through thousands of years of selective breeding.

Newswise: Bees win in survival wars
Released: 5-Apr-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Bees win in survival wars
Flinders University

Like diseases affecting humans, parasites can wage a deadly evolutionary “arms race” against their hosts. But can hosts and parasites upgrade their weapons at the same rate?

Newswise:Video Embedded new-study-shows-spiders-use-webs-to-extend-their-hearing
VIDEO
Released: 29-Mar-2022 9:40 AM EDT
New study shows spiders use webs to extend their hearing
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A newly published study of orb-weaving spiders has yielded some extraordinary results: The spiders are using their webs as extended auditory arrays to capture sounds, possibly giving spiders advanced warning of incoming prey or predators.

Released: 24-Mar-2022 1:45 PM EDT
After mating, fruit fly sperm no longer fully male
Cornell University

Long considered exclusively male, a new study of fruit flies finds sperm become partly female after mating.

21-Mar-2022 10:40 AM EDT
Scientists discover when beetles became prolific
University of Bristol

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found that beetles first roamed the world in the Carboniferous and later diversified alongside the earliest dinosaurs during the Triassic and Jurassic.


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