Feature Channels: Genetics

Filters close
Released: 20-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Scientists reveal how seascapes of the ancient world shaped genetic structure of European populations
Trinity College Dublin

Trinity scientists, along with international colleagues, have explored the importance of sea travel in prehistory by examining the genomes of ancient Maltese humans and comparing these with the genomes of this period from across Europe.

Newswise: Scientists Gain Ground on Rare Congenital Neurological Disorder
Released: 20-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
Scientists Gain Ground on Rare Congenital Neurological Disorder
Cedars-Sinai

Two recent discoveries co-led by scientists at Cedars-Sinai may help lead to new ways to treat patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), a brain development disorder that causes severe intellectual disability and problems with movement.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 25-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 20-May-2022 10:30 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 20-May-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Uncovering new details of the brain's first line of defense
Kyushu University

Thanks to over a century of modern neuroscience, we have made significant strides in our understanding of the brain.

Newswise: Fly researchers find another layer to the code of life
Released: 19-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Fly researchers find another layer to the code of life
Duke University

A new examination of the way different tissues read information from genes has discovered that the brain and testes appear to be extraordinarily open to the use of many different kinds of code to produce a given protein.

Newswise: Some people fared better than others during COVID-19 pandemic due to genetics
11-May-2022 4:15 PM EDT
Some people fared better than others during COVID-19 pandemic due to genetics
PLOS

Genetic factors played a greater role in a person's overall wellbeing as the pandemic wore on.

Newswise: Just Two Weeks Away from ACSM Annual Meeting!
Released: 18-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Just Two Weeks Away from ACSM Annual Meeting!
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

The 2022 ACSM Annual Meeting will be held May 31 – June 4 at the San Diego, CA Convention Center alongside the beautiful San Diego Bay. Join us!

Released: 18-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Identify Tumor-Based Methylation Patterns as Cancer Biomarkers
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new study featured on the cover of the May 1 issue of the journal Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on their identification of biomarkers based on a type of genetic modification called methylation that predicts the type of tumor immune environment and patient outcomes.

Newswise: Anonymous $11 million gift to support and expand neurofibromatosis research at UHN's Krembil Brain Institute
Released: 17-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Anonymous $11 million gift to support and expand neurofibromatosis research at UHN's Krembil Brain Institute
University Health Network (UHN)

Anonymous $11M donation will go toward research, care for Neurofibromatosis patients

Released: 17-May-2022 11:40 AM EDT
Change of temperature causes whole body reprogramming
Université de Genève (University of Geneva)

Human beings, like most organisms, are constantly exposed to alternating colder or warmer temperatures.

Newswise: Protein Linked to Intellectual Disability Has Complex Role
16-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Protein Linked to Intellectual Disability Has Complex Role
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown function for the fragile X protein, the loss of which is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The researchers showed that the protein modulates how neurons in the brain’s memory center process information, a central part of learning and memory.

Released: 17-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Vyriad, Inc. Raises $29.5M in Series B Funding Led by Renowned Genetics Entrepreneur
Vyriad, Inc.

Vyriad, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing oncolytic virus therapies to treat a wide range of cancers, today announced $29.5M in new funding led by Mr. Harry Stine of Stine Seed Farms, Inc.

Newswise: COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response
12-May-2022 2:15 PM EDT
COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response
University of California San Diego Health

COVID-19, MIS-C and KD all share a similar underlying mechanism involving the over-activation of particular inflammatory pathways, UC San Diego study shows. Findings support novel drug targets for MIS-C.

Newswise: New Measure of Sperm Age May Be Predictor of Pregnancy Success
Released: 13-May-2022 12:20 PM EDT
New Measure of Sperm Age May Be Predictor of Pregnancy Success
Wayne State University Division of Research

A novel technique to measure the age of male sperm has the potential to predict the success and time it takes to become pregnant, according to a newly published study by researchers at the Wayne State University School of Medicine.

Newswise: Novel Cell Atlas for Multiple Human Tissues Reveals Discoveries Underlying Complex Diseases
12-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
Novel Cell Atlas for Multiple Human Tissues Reveals Discoveries Underlying Complex Diseases
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Scientists from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a first-of-its-kind cross-tissue cell atlas, and in collaboration with researchers at Mass Eye and Ear, have uncovered new clues for specific cell types and genes involved in complex diseases. In a new study published May 12 in Science, researchers described for the first time how their novel cross-tissue cell atlas derived from an analysis of nuclei from 25 frozen samples from 8 tissue types may increase understanding of the cellular and genetic underpinnings of complex diseases, including heart disease and cancers.

Newswise:Video Embedded from-cavefish-to-humans-evolution-of-metabolism-in-cavefish-may-provide-insight-into-treatments-for-a-host-of-diseases-such-as-diabetes-heart-disease-and-stroke
VIDEO
11-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
From Cavefish to Humans: Evolution of Metabolism in Cavefish May Provide Insight Into Treatments for a Host of Diseases Such as Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

New research examines how cavefish developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be applicable for humans.

Newswise: UTSW Genetic Study Confirms Sarin Nerve Gas as Cause of Gulf War Illness
Released: 12-May-2022 12:05 AM EDT
UTSW Genetic Study Confirms Sarin Nerve Gas as Cause of Gulf War Illness
UT Southwestern Medical Center

For three decades, scientists have debated the underlying cause of Gulf War illness (GWI), a collection of unexplained and chronic symptoms affecting veterans of the Persian Gulf War. Now researchers led by Robert Haley, M.D., Professor of Internal Medicine and Director of the Division of Epidemiology at UT Southwestern, have solved the mystery, showing through a detailed genetic study that the nerve gas sarin was largely responsible for the syndrome.

Released: 11-May-2022 10:20 AM EDT
Multiple diagnoses are the norm for mental illness; A new genetic analysis helps explain why
University of Colorado Boulder

More than half of people diagnosed with one psychiatric disorder will be diagnosed with a second or third in their lifetime. About a third have four or more.

Released: 10-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
妙佑医疗国际的骨髓癌研究发现潜在药物靶点
Mayo Clinic

妙佑医疗国际(Mayo Clinic) 个体化医学中心(Center for individualized Medicine )的新研究发现,携带ASXL1突变体的慢性粒单核细胞白血病(一种罕见骨髓癌)患者中存在独特的表观遗传变化,可激活有害基因并导致癌细胞更快生长。ASXL1基因突变还能使疾病转化为更具侵袭性的急性髓细胞性白血病。

Released: 10-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Descoberta da Mayo Clinic sobre câncer de medula óssea aponta para possíveis alvos de medicamentos
Mayo Clinic

Uma nova pesquisa do Centro de Medicina Individualizada da Mayo Clinic descobre que pacientes com leucemia mielomonocítica crônica com mutação ASXL1 (um tipo incomum de câncer de medula óssea) têm alterações epigenéticas específicas que podem ativar genes nocivos e fazer com que o câncer cresça mais rapidamente.

Released: 10-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
اكتشاف مايو كلينك في سرطان نخاع العظم يشير إلى أهداف محتملة من الأدوية
Mayo Clinic

وجد بحث جديد من مركز مايو كلينك للطب الفردي أن المرضى المصابين بابيضاض الدم المايلومونيكي المزمن بسبب طفرة ASXL1 - وهو نوع غير شائع من سرطان نخاع العظم - لديهم تغييرات لاجينية مميزة يمكنها تنشيط الجينات الضارة وتتسبب في نمو السرطان بشكل أسرع. كما يمكن لطفرة ASXL1 الجينية تحويل المرض إلى ابيضاض الدم النقوي الحاد الأكثر عدوانية.

Released: 10-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Descubrimiento de Mayo Clinic en cáncer de médula ósea apunta hacia posibles dianas farmacológicas
Mayo Clinic

Las nuevas investigaciones del Centro para Medicina Personalizada de Mayo Clinic descubren que los pacientes con leucemia mielomonocítica crónica con mutación en el gen ASXL1, un tipo raro de cáncer de la médula ósea, sufren cambios epigenéticos distintivos que activan genes nocivos y hacen que el cáncer se desarrolle con más rapidez.

Newswise: Gene Therapy Could Treat Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, Proof-of-Concept Study Suggests
Released: 10-May-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Gene Therapy Could Treat Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, Proof-of-Concept Study Suggests
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

University of North Carolina School of Medicine scientists, who report their results in the journal eLife, devised an experimental, gene-therapy-like technique to restore the normal activity of the gene deficient in people with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome.

Released: 6-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Minerals can be key to healing damaged tissue
Texas A&M University

Every species, from bacteria to humans, is capable of regeneration. Regeneration is mediated by the molecular processes that regulate gene expression to control tissue renewal, restoration and growth.

3-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Develop New Computational Tool to Interpret Clinical Significance of Cancer Mutations
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a new tool to help researchers interpret the clinical significance of somatic mutations in cancer. The tool, known as CancerVar, incorporates machine learning frameworks to go beyond merely identifying somatic cancer mutations and interpret the potential significance of those mutations in terms of cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and targetability. A paper describing CancerVar was published today in Science Advances.

Released: 6-May-2022 10:35 AM EDT
“Digital twins” – an aid to give individual patients the right treatment at the right time
Linkoping University

An international team of researchers have developed advanced computer models, or “digital twins”, of diseases, with the goal of improving diagnosis and treatment.

Released: 5-May-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Quantum mechanics could explain why DNA can spontaneously mutate
University of Surrey

The molecules of life, DNA, replicate with astounding precision, yet this process is not immune to mistakes and can lead to mutations.

Newswise: New Tool Integrates Microbiome and Host Genetic Sequencing Analysis
Released: 5-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
New Tool Integrates Microbiome and Host Genetic Sequencing Analysis
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

A new software tool makes it easier to study relationships between a host, its microbiome and pathogens like HIV or SARS-CoV-2.

Released: 4-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Rutgers Scientists Develop Test That Easily Detects Variants Causing COVID-19
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers scientists have developed a lab test that can quickly and easily identify which variant of the virus causing COVID-19 has infected a person, an advance expected to greatly assist health officials tracking the disease and physicians treating infected patients.

Newswise: A ‘factory reset’ for the brain cures anxiety, drinking behavior
Released: 4-May-2022 3:35 PM EDT
A ‘factory reset’ for the brain cures anxiety, drinking behavior
University of Illinois Chicago

Gene editing may be a potential treatment for anxiety and alcohol use disorder in adults who were exposed to binge drinking in their adolescence, according to the results of an animal study published in the journal Science Advances. The researchers used a gene-editing tool called CRISPR-dCas9 in their experiments to manipulate the histone acetylation and methylation processes at the Arc gene in models of adult rats.

Newswise: UTSW Geneticist Jonathan Cohen Elected to the National Academy of Sciences
Released: 4-May-2022 12:05 AM EDT
UTSW Geneticist Jonathan Cohen Elected to the National Academy of Sciences
UT Southwestern Medical Center

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today elected UT Southwestern scientist Jonathan Cohen, Ph.D., into its membership, one of the highest honors for American scientists. Dr. Cohen, Professor of Internal Medicine in the Center for Human Nutrition and the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development at UT Southwestern, was elected by his peers in recognition of distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. His research centers on identifying genes that play major roles in the metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides and elucidating the biological roles of their protein products.

Released: 3-May-2022 12:55 PM EDT
How a bot beamed from California to Japan may prevent cancer patients from losing their breasts unnecessarily
Global Alliance for Genomics and Health

Too many women are getting unnecessary mastectomies and other invasive procedures because of a knowledge gap about differences in cancer genes. A new study offers a path to closing the gap.

Released: 3-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
TGen, ASU, NAU, UArizona, ADHS compile 100,000 sequenced genomes of COVID
Northern Arizona University

The Arizona COVID-19 Genomics Union, led by Paul Keim and others throughout the state, is positioning Arizona to play a role in the planned U.S. Pathogen Genomics Centers of Excellence, a national network funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that would expand and deepen infectious disease collaborations between U.S. public health agencies and universities.

Newswise: Gene Therapy Reverses Effects of Autism-Linked Mutation in Brain Organoids
Released: 2-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Gene Therapy Reverses Effects of Autism-Linked Mutation in Brain Organoids
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego scientists use lab-grown human brain tissue to identify neural abnormalities in Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome and show gene therapy tools can rescue neural structure and function.

Newswise: Lighting the tunnel of plant evolution: Scientists explore importance of two-pore channels in plants
Released: 2-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Lighting the tunnel of plant evolution: Scientists explore importance of two-pore channels in plants
Tokyo University of Science

Two-pore channels (TPCs) are ancient ion channels present in the cells of both animals and plants.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:20 AM EDT
New sleep molecule discovered: “It shows just how complex the machinery of sleep is”
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

When brain scientist Birgitte Kornum from the Department of Neuroscience recently arrived in Rome for one of the largest sleep conferences in the world, she was completely taken aback.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Rutgers Researcher Aims to Protect and Regenerate Corals Through Coral Genomics with $500K NSF Grant and Award-Winning Video
Rutgers University's Office for Research

A Rutgers researcher will use genomics, genetics, and cell biology to identify and understand the corals’ response to heat stress conditions and to pinpoint master regulatory genes involved in coral bleaching due to global warming and climate change. The researcher and his team will use a novel gene-editing tool as a resource to knock down some gene functions with the goal of boosting the corals’ abilities to survive.

20-Apr-2022 2:00 PM EDT
DNA Analysis Provides Insight into Associations Between Worse COVID and Other Conditions
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Through analyzing human DNA samples in a large biobank, Penn Medicine researchers found associations between genetic variants with severe COVID and conditions involving blood clots and respiratory issues

Newswise: Study Reveals Genetic Diversity of a Particularly Problematic Pathogen
Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:55 PM EDT
Study Reveals Genetic Diversity of a Particularly Problematic Pathogen
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego have used a systems biology approach to parse the genetic diversity of Clostridioides difficile, a particularly problematic pathogen, particularly in health care settings.

Newswise: Scientists Implicate Non-Cardiac Genes in Congenital Heart Disease
Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Scientists Implicate Non-Cardiac Genes in Congenital Heart Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC-Chapel Hill, Princeton, and Boston Children’s Hospital researchers show how three transcription factors inside the embryonic heart recruit the protein subunit CHD4 for their role known roles in heart health and disease.

Released: 26-Apr-2022 3:30 PM EDT
How personality and genetics impact link between racial discrimination and problem drinking
Arizona State University (ASU)

A study published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence shows that the connection of racial discrimination to problem drinking differs based on personality traits. People who tend to act impulsively in response to negative experiences are more likely to report problematic alcohol use that is associated with racism. But, people who enjoy seeking out new experiences are less likely to report problematic alcohol use that is associated with racism. Though this personality trait is thought to be a common risk factor for alcohol use disorder, this study suggests that people with sensation-seeking personalities can better tolerate or cope with difficult situations such as racism.

Released: 26-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
MSU research could lead to new Alzheimer’s treatments
Michigan State University

Working with tiny bacteria, Michigan State University researchers led by Lee Kroos have made a discovery that could have big implications for biology. The researchers revealed a new way that nature can inhibit or switch off important proteins known as intramembrane proteases — pronounced “pro tea aces” — which the team reported April 26th in the journal eLife.

Newswise: Poor diet associated with increased diabetes risk across all gradients of genetic risk
20-Apr-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Poor diet associated with increased diabetes risk across all gradients of genetic risk
PLOS

A poor diet, irrespective of genetic risk factors, is associated with a 30% increased risk of diabetes

Newswise: New Research Highlights Racial Disparities in Genomic Profiling
Released: 25-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
New Research Highlights Racial Disparities in Genomic Profiling
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Inadequate genomic data on Black women with metastatic breast cancer reduces their access to targeted therapies

Released: 21-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Evidence suggests cancer is not as purely genetic as once thought
University of Alberta

U of A researcher says a more holistic view portrays the disease as much more preventable, easier to understand, and potentially, far more treatable.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Single-cell DNA sequencing offers a new angle on the causes of Alzheimer’s disease
Boston Children's Hospital

Alzheimer’s disease is marked by a loss of functional neurons in the brain.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Genetic changes differed, increased in people with Alzheimer’s disease
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Inside brain cells, errors in DNA can accumulate as we age. But in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, these errors — known as somatic mutations — may build up at a faster rate.

Newswise:Video Embedded for-neurons-where-they-begin-isn-t-necessarily-where-they-end
VIDEO
Released: 20-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
For Neurons, Where They Begin Isn’t Necessarily Where They End
University of California San Diego Health

Scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute of Genomic Medicine describe novel methods for inferring the movement of human brain cells during fetal development by studying healthy adult individuals who have recently passed away from natural causes.


Showing results

150 of 6580

close
1.84566