Feature Channels: Genetics

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Embargo will expire: 10-Jun-2020 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Jun-2020 10:45 AM EDT

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Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility
Kumamoto University

A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis.

Newswise: Some types of prostate cancer may not be as aggressive as originally thought
Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Some types of prostate cancer may not be as aggressive as originally thought
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed gene-expression patterns in the most aggressive prostate cancer grade group — known as Gleason grade group 5 — and found that this grade of cancer can actually be subdivided into four subtypes with distinct differences. The findings may affect how people are treated for the disease.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 10:45 AM EDT
DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products
Harvard Medical School

Harvard scientists have developed DNA-barcoded microbial spores that can be safely introduced onto objects and surfaces at a point of origin, such as a field or manufacturing plant, and be identified months later, to help trace problems like the source of foodborne illness.

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VIDEO
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
Split Ends: New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division
Harvard Medical School

Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells. Two Harvard Medical School studies provide new insights into how crossovers go right--and wrong, leading to infertility, miscarriages and birth defects.

Newswise: Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
1-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
Yale Cancer Center

Yale Cancer Center scientists have identified mutations in metabolite-producing genes as a disruption of DNA repair. These mutation-driven “oncometabolites” may make cells more prone to developing cancer—but also more vulnerable to new cancer treatment strategies.

Newswise: New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
3-Jun-2020 4:20 AM EDT
New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and the Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa in Spain have created a test that determines which children with CAD deficiency—a rare metabolic disease—are likely to benefit from receiving uridine, a nutritional supplement that has dramatically improved the lives of other children with the condition. The study was published in Genetics in Medicine.

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Released: 3-Jun-2020 5:30 AM EDT
Genetic study reveals similarities and differences of COVID-19 and SARS viruses
University of Tokyo

Researchers have identified specific portions of the genetic codes of the COVID-19 and SARS viruses that may promote the viruses' lifecycles. The new technique is researchers' first tool for determining what genetic sequences stored as RNA - DNA's chemical cousin - are more stable.

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Released: 2-Jun-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence
Cell Press

The collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls include, among other ancient texts, the oldest copies of books of the Hebrew Bible. But finding a way to piece them all together in order to understand their meaning has remained an incredibly difficult puzzle, especially given that most pieces weren't excavated in an orderly fashion.

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Released: 29-May-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Genetics May Explain High COVID-19 Mortality in Italy, Inform Global Pandemic Response
Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO)

Researchers predict the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) gene has a key role in shaping immune response to COVID.

Released: 29-May-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Next Frontier in Bacterial Engineering
Harvard Medical School

A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering Researchers develop method to identify proteins that enable highly efficient bacterial design Approach has potential to boost efforts in bacterial design to tackle infectious diseases, bacterial drug resistance, environmental cleanup and more

Released: 28-May-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Bone Researcher Provides Expert Commentary in Publication’s Controversial Reversal of Long-Held Theory
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

The latest issue of PLOS Genetics includes two publications that challenge the basic assumptions behind 24 years of bone and metabolism research, and given the magnitude of the potential paradigm shift, the editors turned to Stavros C. Manolagas, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) to provide expert commentary and context.

Released: 28-May-2020 3:45 PM EDT
4,000 years of contact, conflict & cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous changes in cultures, religions and languages.

Newswise:Video Embedded at-home-screening-for-ovarian-breast-cancers-is-effective
VIDEO
Released: 28-May-2020 11:30 AM EDT
At-home screening for ovarian, breast cancers is effective
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

At-home genetic-testing kits for breast and ovarian cancer risk are just as effective, and in some cases even more so, than the typical protocol for genetic testing, which requires repeated office visits and counseling, according to a study led by UW Medicine researchers.

Newswise: Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered in inner ear
Released: 26-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered in inner ear
University of Virginia Health System

New research is shedding light on the biological architecture that lets us hear – and on a genetic disorder that causes both deafness and blindness.

Newswise: $5 million supports research into neglected tropical diseases
Released: 21-May-2020 11:20 AM EDT
$5 million supports research into neglected tropical diseases
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received two grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling more than $5 million to study two types of parasitic worm infection that cause devastating illness in millions of people worldwide. One project will focus on onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness. The second project will target fascioliasis, commonly found in cattle-farming operations.

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Released: 20-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
A new understanding of everyday cellular processes
University of Warwick

Cellular processes happen every day in humans and plants, such as homeostasis and photosynthesis

Newswise: Complement genes add to sex-based vulnerability in lupus and schizophrenia
Released: 19-May-2020 7:10 AM EDT
Complement genes add to sex-based vulnerability in lupus and schizophrenia
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Variants in a gene of the human immune system cause men and women to have different vulnerabilities to the autoimmune diseases lupus and Sjögren’s syndrome, according to findings published in the journal Nature. The gene variants are a member of the complement system.

Released: 18-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Genome Study Links DNA Changes to the Risks of Specific Breast Cancer Subtypes
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An analysis of genetic studies covering 266,000 women has revealed 32 new sites on the human genome where variations in DNA appear to alter the risks of getting breast cancer.

Newswise: Grant will help scientists break new ground in gene editing
Released: 18-May-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Grant will help scientists break new ground in gene editing
Iowa State University

A new grant from the National Institutes of Health will allow Iowa State University scientists to continue to develop gene editing technologies to model human disease in zebrafish. The research aims to build new tools to determine which genes have therapeutic potential to treat human genetic diseases that affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems.

Newswise: New Algorithm Analyzes the Genetic Building Blocks of Immunity
Released: 15-May-2020 10:05 AM EDT
New Algorithm Analyzes the Genetic Building Blocks of Immunity
University of California San Diego

Scientists with UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering and the Qualcomm Institute have developed a new gene prediction algorithm, called MINING-D, that could help researchers investigate the genetic clues behind the variation of symptoms shown in COVID-19 patients — information that is key to creating a versatile and effective vaccine.

Newswise: Study Demonstrates Impact of Both Inherited and Acquired Mutations on Cancer
14-May-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Study Demonstrates Impact of Both Inherited and Acquired Mutations on Cancer
Yale Cancer Center

The common belief that tumors arise via activation of a few genes that “drive” cancer development is unsupported by a widespread investigation into those genes and others in three large patient genetic databases, according to a study led by Yale Cancer Center (YCC) researchers.

11-May-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers identify most powerful gene variant for height known to date
Harvard Medical School

• Newly discovered gene variant in Peruvian populations is powerfully linked with height • Five percent of Peruvians carry the variant, which originates exclusively from Native American populations • The variant occurs on a gene that, when mutated, causes Marfan syndrome, a condition marked by connective tissue abnormalities, including serious cardiovascular problems • The newly discovered variant is not associated with disease and may confer adaptive evolutionary advantage to populations that carry it

Newswise:Video Embedded sex-genes-and-vulnerability
VIDEO
8-May-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Sex, Genes and Vulnerability
Harvard Medical School

New work led by researchers in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School and at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard provides a clear genetic explanation behind the long-standing yet mysterious observation that some diseases occur more often, hit harder or elicit different symptoms in men or women.

Released: 8-May-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Houston Methodist researchers find telling clues in virus genes from COVID-19 patients
Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist released gene sequencing results from the first strains of the virus causing COVID-19 disease in Houston. Results reveal multiple introductions of SARS-CoV-2 into Houston followed by rapid community spread. No evidence was found of mutations making any strains of the virus more severe. Pathologists analyzed genomes of 320 SARS-CoV-2 strains collected from COVID-19 patients, making this the largest sample of SARS-CoV-2 genes sequenced from patients in the southern U.S.

Released: 8-May-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Promising study by Texas A&M scientists offers hope for Menkes disease patients
Texas A&M AgriLife

A Texas A&M AgriLife Research team has good news for patients with copper-deficiency disorders, especially young children diagnosed with Menkes disease.

Newswise: Ancient DNA paints genetic portrait of Andes civilisations
Released: 8-May-2020 8:15 AM EDT
Ancient DNA paints genetic portrait of Andes civilisations
University of Adelaide

An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has completed the first large-scale study of DNA belonging to ancient humans of the central Andes in South America and found early genetic differences between groups of nearby regions, and surprising genetic continuity over thousands of years. In the study, published in the journal Cell, researchers analysed the DNA of 89 ancient humans who lived in the central Andes between 500 and 9,000 years ago, and compared it with the genetic diversity of present day occupants, to shed light on the genetic changes over time.

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Released: 7-May-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Virgin Birth Has Scientists Buzzing
University of Sydney

Researchers discover a gene in honey bees that causes virgin birth

Newswise: Ancient Andes, Analyzed
1-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Ancient Andes, Analyzed
Harvard Medical School

An international research team has conducted the first in-depth, wide-scale study of the genomic history of ancient civilizations in the central Andes mountains and coast before European contact. The findings reveal early genetic distinctions between groups in nearby regions, population mixing within and beyond the Andes, surprising genetic continuity amid cultural upheaval, and ancestral cosmopolitanism among some of the region's most well-known ancient civilizations.

4-May-2020 3:50 PM EDT
First-in-Kind Study Reveals Genetic Markers of Type 2 Diabetes in East Asians
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This research, published in Nature, shows how different populations of people share most of the genetic susceptibilities to developing type 2 diabetes but do have some different genetic variations that can make them more or less susceptible to developing the condition.

Released: 5-May-2020 3:40 PM EDT
AMP Recommends Minimum Set of Pharmacogenetic Alleles to Help Standardize Clinical Genotyping Testing for Warfarin Response
Association for Molecular Pathology

AMP has published consensus, evidence-based recommendations to aid in the design, validation and interpretation of clinical genotyping tests for the prediction of warfarin response. The manuscript, “Recommendations for Clinical Warfarin Sensitivity Genotyping Allele Selection: A Joint Recommendation of the Association for Molecular Pathology and College of American Pathologists,” was released online ahead of publication in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

Newswise: Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital Advancing Novel Experimental Gene-based COVID-19 Vaccine, AAVCOVID
Released: 5-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital Advancing Novel Experimental Gene-based COVID-19 Vaccine, AAVCOVID
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), members of Mass General Brigham, today announced progress towards the testing and development of an experimental vaccine called AAVCOVID, a novel gene-based vaccine candidate against SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The AAVCOVID Vaccine Program is a unique, gene-based vaccine strategy that uses adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, a clinically established gene transfer technology leveraging the properties of a harmless viral carrier.

Newswise: For two UB scientists, love means studying their daughter’s rare disease
Released: 4-May-2020 1:50 PM EDT
For two UB scientists, love means studying their daughter’s rare disease
University at Buffalo

Few people in the world would have understood what it meant. But when doctors diagnosed 2-year-old Yuna Lee with FOXG1 syndrome, her parents recognized the disease immediately. The rare genetic disorder explained Yuna’s seizures. It explained why Yuna hadn’t yet learned to talk. It explained why she struggled to sit up.

Newswise: Genetic complexity: A spanner in the works?
Released: 4-May-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Genetic complexity: A spanner in the works?
McMaster University

The promise of personalized medicine has not fully materialized, say two McMaster researchers, because the full sophistication of the genetic blueprint has a more complex and far-reaching influence on human health than scientists had first realized.

Released: 4-May-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Combining mouse and human data uncovers new gene regulating cholesterol
University of Wisconsin-Madison

By combining the fine-grained detail available from animal studies with the statistical power of genetic studies involving hundreds of thousands of human genomes, researchers have discovered a new gene involved in regulating the body’s cholesterol.

Newswise: Gender identity plays a role in the amount of pain experienced by individuals with chronic pain
Released: 1-May-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Gender identity plays a role in the amount of pain experienced by individuals with chronic pain
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Gender identity and genetic sex are distinctly variable when it comes to pain tolerance, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain Research.

Newswise: Researchers Silence PRMT5 Gene to Slow Mesothelioma Using Precision Medicine
Released: 1-May-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Researchers Silence PRMT5 Gene to Slow Mesothelioma Using Precision Medicine
Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO)

Silencing of the protein coding gene PRMT5 has possible therapeutic potential for treating Mesothelioma (MM), according to a recent in vitro study published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

Newswise: Researchers Find New Insights Linking Cell Division to Cancer
Released: 29-Apr-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Researchers Find New Insights Linking Cell Division to Cancer
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) and collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) published research in the journal Nature extending our understanding of cell division. They discovered the protein LEM2 has two important functions during cell division.

Newswise: Scientists Explore Links Between Genetics, Gut Microbiome and Memory
Released: 29-Apr-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists Explore Links Between Genetics, Gut Microbiome and Memory
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have traced the molecular connections between genetics, the gut microbiome and memory in a mouse model bred to resemble the diversity of the human population. Researchers from two U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories identified lactate, a molecule produced by all species of one gut microbe, as a key memory-boosting molecular messenger.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Insights into Why Loud Noise is Bad for Your Health
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Two new mouse studies provide new insight into how noise exposure can lead to high blood pressure and cancer-related DNA damage.

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Released: 24-Apr-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Diverse livelihoods helped resilient Levänluhta people survive a climate disaster
University of Helsinki

A multidisciplinary research group coordinated by the University of Helsinki dated the bones of dozens of Iron Age residents of the Levänluhta site in Finland, and studied the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios.

Released: 23-Apr-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Key nose cells identified as likely COVID-19 virus entry points
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Two specific cell types in the nose have been identified as likely initial infection points for COVID-19 coronavirus. Scientists discovered that goblet and ciliated cells in the nose have high levels of the entry proteins that the COVID-19 virus uses to get into our cells.

Released: 23-Apr-2020 2:05 PM EDT
SHE Center at Dana-Farber and Silverberry Genomix form SHE Biobank, a Population Health Initiative for Research and Education
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dana-Farber and Silverberry Genomix launch the SHE Biobank initiative -- a long-term study to investigate the impact of genetic predisposition and environmental exposure to development of disease.

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Released: 22-Apr-2020 3:05 PM EDT
New bat species discovered -- cousins of the ones suspected in COVID-19
Field Museum

Bats play a huge but poorly understood role in humans' lives--they pollinate our crops, eat disease-carrying mosquitos, and carry diseases themselves.

Newswise: Diabetes reversed in mice with genetically edited stem cells derived from patients
21-Apr-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Diabetes reversed in mice with genetically edited stem cells derived from patients
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have used induced pluripotent stem cells produced from the skin of a patient with a rare, genetic form of insulin-dependent diabetes, transformed the stem cells into insulin-producing cells, used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to correct a defect that caused a form of diabetes, and implanted the cells into mice to reverse diabetes in the animals.

Newswise: NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
20-Apr-2020 12:05 PM EDT
NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. The findings, published online April 21 in Cell Reports, suggest that the epigenome could be targeted as a therapeutic strategy to prevent leading causes of vision loss, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD).


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