Feature Channels: Genetics

Filters close
Released: 11-Jul-2023 2:20 PM EDT
How an essential class of proteins can access blocked genes
Ohio State University

New research shows how one transcription factor functions as a special “pioneer factor” by managing to bind to a blocked segment of DNA to begin the process of opening up and activating a gene.

   
Newswise: Gene that regulates immune activity in the retina identified
Released: 11-Jul-2023 11:25 AM EDT
Gene that regulates immune activity in the retina identified
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a gene called Lipe that appears to be pivotal to retinal health, with mutations spurring immune activation and retinal degeneration. This is important because the retina is responsible for detecting the light that is transformed into vision. The findings, published in Communications Biology, provide clues about the mechanisms behind a variety of disorders affecting the retina, including macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

Newswise: Genome Sequencing Nearly Twice as Effective as a Targeted Gene-Sequencing Test at Diagnosing Genetic Disorders in Newborns and Infants
10-Jul-2023 9:00 AM EDT
Genome Sequencing Nearly Twice as Effective as a Targeted Gene-Sequencing Test at Diagnosing Genetic Disorders in Newborns and Infants
Tufts University

A new national study, led by researchers at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, has found whole genome sequencing (WGS) to be nearly twice as effective as a targeted gene sequencing test at identifying abnormalities responsible for genetic disorders in newborns and infants.

Newswise: Capturing the immense potential of microscopic DNA for data storage
Released: 11-Jul-2023 8:25 AM EDT
Capturing the immense potential of microscopic DNA for data storage
National University of Singapore (NUS)

In a world first, a ‘biological camera’ bypasses the constraints of current DNA storage methods, harnessing living cells and their inherent biological mechanisms to encode and store data. This represents a significant breakthrough in encoding and storing images directly within DNA, creating a new model for information storage reminiscent of a digital camera.

   
Newswise: The structure of a protein bound to DNA reveals how the toxicity of the cholera bacterium is activated
Released: 11-Jul-2023 8:20 AM EDT
The structure of a protein bound to DNA reveals how the toxicity of the cholera bacterium is activated
Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona

A team led by Dr. Miquel Coll at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and the Institute of Molecular Biology of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), in collaboration with researchers led by Dr. Eric Krukonis at the University of Detroit Mercy in the USA, has revealed the atomic structure of the ToxR protein bound to the DNA of two promoters of the genes that cause the virulence of this bacterium.

   
Newswise: Sylvester Researchers, Collaborators Seek Answers to Prostate, Breast Cancer Among People of African Ancestry
Released: 10-Jul-2023 10:30 PM EDT
Sylvester Researchers, Collaborators Seek Answers to Prostate, Breast Cancer Among People of African Ancestry
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cancer Disparities: A new African Cancer Genome Registry at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in Miami seeks to find reasons for higher prostate and breast cancer rates in people of African ancestry. Dr. Sophia George, co-principal investigator, is available for interviews, as are two breast and prostate cancer study participants.

Released: 10-Jul-2023 4:05 PM EDT
Hematopoietic stem cell culture technology for more effective and safer genome editing
University of Tsukuba

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare cells found in the bone marrow that produce red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Released: 10-Jul-2023 3:10 PM EDT
Solving rare disease mysteries
Macquarie University

Macquarie University researchers have demonstrated a new way of linking personal records and protecting privacy. The first application is in identifying cases of rare genetic disorders.

Newswise: Pediatric hepatoblastoma model hints at DNA damage repair pathway for novel therapeutics
Released: 10-Jul-2023 8:15 AM EDT
Pediatric hepatoblastoma model hints at DNA damage repair pathway for novel therapeutics
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital used genomics to inform the creation of genetic and new cell-line models for hepatoblastoma, which pointed toward the DNA damage repair pathway as a promising therapeutic route.

Newswise: Researchers find weaker immune response to viral infections in children with mitochondrial disorders
Released: 7-Jul-2023 2:40 PM EDT
Researchers find weaker immune response to viral infections in children with mitochondrial disorders
NIH, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

In a new study, National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers found that altered B cell function in children with mitochondrial disorders led to a weaker and less diverse antibody response to viral infections.

Released: 7-Jul-2023 11:20 AM EDT
Researchers uncover how a genetic mutation can cause individuals with normal cholesterol levels to develop coronary artery disease at a young age
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A novel molecular pathway to explain how a mutation in the gene ACTA2 can cause individuals in their 30s – with normal cholesterol levels and no other risk factors — to develop coronary artery disease has been identified, according to researchers with UTHealth Houston.

Newswise: AI Tool Decodes Brain Cancer’s Genome During Surgery
5-Jul-2023 8:00 AM EDT
AI Tool Decodes Brain Cancer’s Genome During Surgery
Harvard Medical School

New AI tool enables in-surgery genomic profiling of gliomas, the most aggressive and most common brain tumors.

Released: 6-Jul-2023 6:10 PM EDT
Study examines centuries of identity lost because of slavery
University of Southern California (USC)

Many Americans can trace some lines of their family tree back to the 1600s. However, African Americans descended from enslaved Africans, who began arriving in North America in 1619, lack ancestral information spanning several centuries.

Newswise: Genetic changes have decreased maize’s tolerance to severe heat stress and increased resilience to moderate heat stress
29-Jun-2023 1:15 PM EDT
Genetic changes have decreased maize’s tolerance to severe heat stress and increased resilience to moderate heat stress
PLOS

The ability of crops to withstand heat is critical to our food system’s resilience to climate change.

Released: 6-Jul-2023 11:40 AM EDT
How dietary restraint could significantly reduce effects of genetic risk of obesity
University of Exeter

Obesity risk genes make people feel hungrier and lose control over their eating, but practicing dietary restraint could counteract this.

Newswise: New single-cell study provides novel insights into gastric cancer
6-Jul-2023 10:40 AM EDT
New single-cell study provides novel insights into gastric cancer
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

A single-cell study led by MD Anderson researchers and published in Cancer Cell provides a deeper understanding of the evolution of the tumor microenvironment during gastric cancer progression.

Newswise: First New Jersey Patient Treated with Genetically Modified T-Cells Developed at state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center
Released: 5-Jul-2023 12:45 PM EDT
First New Jersey Patient Treated with Genetically Modified T-Cells Developed at state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey has treated its first patient using genetically modified T-cells that were manufactured in its own state-of-the-art Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) facility.

Newswise: Artificial cells demonstrate that
Released: 5-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Artificial cells demonstrate that "life finds a way"
Indiana University

A study using a synthetic ‘minimal cell’ organism stripped down to the 'bare essentials' for life demonstrates the tenacity of organism's power to evolve and adapt, even in the face of an unnatural genome that would seemingly provide little flexibility.

   
Released: 3-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers Identify a New Mechanism, Cancer Hijacks Enzyme Substrate Motif Mutations
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Enzyme mutations have been of great interest to scientists who study cancer. Scientists in the Liu and Tan labs at UNC’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have been studying mutations of enzyme recognition motifs in substrates, which may more faithfully reflect enzyme function with the potential to find new targets or directions for cancer treatment.

Newswise: Base editing shows potential superiority for curing sickle cell disease
Released: 3-Jul-2023 11:00 AM EDT
Base editing shows potential superiority for curing sickle cell disease
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Gene therapy that alters hemoglobin genes may be an answer to curing sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia. Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard found base editing increased fetal hemoglobin production in a new treatment.

Newswise: AI and CRISPR Precisely Control Gene Expression
30-Jun-2023 5:50 PM EDT
AI and CRISPR Precisely Control Gene Expression
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

The study by researchers at New York University, Columbia Engineering, and the New York Genome Center, combines a deep learning model with CRISPR screens to control the expression of human genes in different ways—such as flicking a light switch to shut them off completely or by using a dimmer knob to partially turn down their activity. These precise gene controls could be used to develop new CRISPR-based therapies.

   
Newswise: Breast cancer by age: Study reveals early mutations that predict patient outcomes
25-Jun-2023 9:00 PM EDT
Breast cancer by age: Study reveals early mutations that predict patient outcomes
Sanford Burnham Prebys

A study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys has found that in young women, certain genetic mutations are associated with treatment-resistant breast cancer.

Newswise: How do batteries of our body break?
Released: 29-Jun-2023 4:05 PM EDT
How do batteries of our body break?
Scientific Project Lomonosov

With aging mitochondria – powerhouses of cells – can lose fragments of their DNA, that leads to different pathologies, especially as far as brain and muscles is concerned.

26-Jun-2023 10:50 AM EDT
Scientists identify the first genetic marker for MS severity
University of Cambridge

A study of more than 22,000 people with multiple sclerosis has discovered the first genetic variant associated with faster disease progression, which can rob patients of their mobility and independence over time.

Newswise: Scientists unveil the mechanism behind intracellular connection: Mitofusin 2 is the lock and key
Released: 28-Jun-2023 8:20 AM EDT
Scientists unveil the mechanism behind intracellular connection: Mitofusin 2 is the lock and key
Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona

Researchers at IRB Barcelona, the University of Barcelona (UB), VIMM, and the University of Padua unveil the key role of Mitofusin 2 cellular makeup in interconnecting organelles within cells. As essential structures with specialized functions, these organelles rely on intricate connections for seamless communication. Among these organelles, mitochondria (known as cell powerhouses) and the endoplasmic reticulum (responsible for protein and lipid synthesis) engage in vital exchanges.

Released: 27-Jun-2023 6:20 PM EDT
Monitoring British bats can help identify coronaviruses with pathogen potential
Imperial College London

Researchers who found novel coronaviruses in UK bats say genetic surveys of the viruses should be regularly conducted, even if none of those viruses can infect humans yet.

Released: 27-Jun-2023 5:40 PM EDT
New model provides unprecedented window into human embryonic development
Yale University

Two to three weeks after conception, an embryo faces a critical point in its development. In the stage known as gastrulation, the transformation of embryonic cells into specialized cells begins.

Released: 27-Jun-2023 4:05 PM EDT
A new generic treatment for multiple types of cancer
RIKEN

Researchers led by Katsunori Tanaka at the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR) in Japan and Hiromitsu Haba at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (RNC) have developed a new technique that has the potential to generically treat several kinds of cancer, with fewer negative side effects than currently available methods.

Newswise: Human embryo-like models created from stem cells to understand earliest stages of human development
Released: 27-Jun-2023 11:50 AM EDT
Human embryo-like models created from stem cells to understand earliest stages of human development
University of Cambridge

Cambridge scientists have created a stem cell-derived model of the human embryo in the lab by reprogramming human stem cells. The breakthrough could help research into genetic disorders and in understanding why and how pregnancies fail.

Newswise: Public-private consortium will fund three gene therapy clinical trials at UT Southwestern and Children’s Health
Released: 27-Jun-2023 11:45 AM EDT
Public-private consortium will fund three gene therapy clinical trials at UT Southwestern and Children’s Health
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A consortium of government, industry, and nonprofit partners will fund gene therapy clinical trials for three different rare diseases at UT Southwestern Medical Center and Children’s Health, where scientists are working on gene therapies to treat neurodevelopmental disorders in children.

Newswise: UAlbany Professor Receives Funding to Advance ALS Research
Released: 27-Jun-2023 10:50 AM EDT
UAlbany Professor Receives Funding to Advance ALS Research
University at Albany, State University of New York

University at Albany’s Professor Li Niu has received new funding to support his research investigating new treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The proposed work will build on his lab’s existing research in this area, with a focus on testing RNA aptamers designed to block excessive activity of glutamate receptors, which causes cell death in the spinal cord and brain. The team hopes that their findings will help inform a new and an effective approach to ALS treatment.

Released: 27-Jun-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Do Children Inherit Parents’ Stressful Experiences?
Tufts University

Scientists are discovering that a parent’s experiences can lead to changes in gene expression that are encoded in the sperm or egg and passed to offspring. In other words, there is a way in which offspring inherit the experiences of their parents. This is different than inheriting genes for brown or blue eyes. It’s more like inheriting genes that are switched on or off for the purpose of being better adapted to a particular environment.

Released: 26-Jun-2023 4:05 PM EDT
Mayo Clinic uses genomic testing broadly for rare diseases, improves patient care
Mayo Clinic

A Mayo Clinic study published in Journal of Translational Medicine evaluated the use of genomic testing broadly for rare diseases.

Released: 26-Jun-2023 9:45 AM EDT
Pessoas com obesidade mórbida e uma variante genética apresentam maior risco de hipertensão, revela pesquisa da Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic

Pessoas com obesidade grave e uma variante genética específica correm maior risco de pressão alta, descobriu um estudo da Mayo Clinic.

Released: 26-Jun-2023 9:05 AM EDT
Las personas con obesidad grave y una variante de vía genética corren un mayor riesgo de tener hipertensión, según una investigación de Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic

Las personas con obesidad severa y una variante genética específica tienen un mayor riesgo de hipertensión, según descubrió un estudio de Mayo Clinic.

Released: 26-Jun-2023 12:05 AM EDT
توصلت أبحاث Mayo Clinic أن من يعانون من السُمنة المفرطة وأحد المتغيرات الجينية، عرضة أكثر للإصابة بارتفاع ضغط الدم
Mayo Clinic

مع السمنة ، يزداد خطر الإصابة بأمراض القلب والأوعية الدموية ، والتي تشمل السكتة الدماغية وفشل القلب الاحتقاني واحتشاء عضلة القلب. السمنة مرض متعدد العوامل ينتج عن اختلال توازن الطاقة. السمنة عامل خطر قابل للتعديل لأمراض القلب والأوعية الدموية.

Newswise: ‘We’re all Asgardians’: new clues about the origin of complex life
Released: 22-Jun-2023 5:45 PM EDT
‘We’re all Asgardians’: new clues about the origin of complex life
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Thor, the legendary Norse god from the mythological city of Asgard, is not alone. According to groundbreaking research published in the journal Nature, we humans — along with eagles, starfish, daisies and every complex organism on Earth — are, in a sense, Asgardians.

Newswise:Video Embedded fda-approves-first-gene-therapy-treatment-for-duchenne-muscular-dystrophy-developed-at-the-abigail-wexner-research-institute-at-nationwide-children-s-hospital
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jun-2023 3:00 PM EDT
FDA Approves First Gene Therapy Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Developed at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Today, the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital praised the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its accelerated approval of SRP-9001/ELEVIDYS for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) following decades of research in its Center for Gene Therapy to help patients with neuromuscular diseases.

Newswise: DePaul University computer scientists sequence cotton genome
Released: 22-Jun-2023 12:40 PM EDT
DePaul University computer scientists sequence cotton genome
DePaul University

Computer scientists at DePaul University applied a bioinformatics workflow to reconstruct one of the most complete genomes of a top cotton species. Experts say the results give scientists a more complete picture of how wild cotton was domesticated over time and may help to strengthen and protect the crop for farmers in the U.S., Africa and beyond.

Newswise: Tumor mutation associated with drug-resistant liver cancer, UT Southwestern study finds
Released: 22-Jun-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Tumor mutation associated with drug-resistant liver cancer, UT Southwestern study finds
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A genetic marker discovered by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers could help physicians predict which patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are most likely to develop resistance to the drug lenvatinib. The finding, published in the journal Gastroenterology, may lead to alternative treatments for the most common form of liver cancer.

Newswise: Breakdown of ‘protective mechanisms’ can drive lung cancer development
Released: 22-Jun-2023 10:45 AM EDT
Breakdown of ‘protective mechanisms’ can drive lung cancer development
Van Andel Institute

Loss of two key “protector” proteins initiates epigenetic changes that transform healthy lung cells into cancerous ones, according to new research from Van Andel Institute scientists.

Newswise: Portable Tool to Diagnose and Monitor Sickle Cell Disease Receives U.S. Patent
Released: 22-Jun-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Portable Tool to Diagnose and Monitor Sickle Cell Disease Receives U.S. Patent
Florida Atlantic University

A new tool will enable patients with sickle cell disease to reliably and conveniently monitor their disease in the same way patients with diabetes can monitor their disease using a glucometer. The goal of managing this inherited, lifelong blood disorder is to prevent acute, painful crises due to sickling and unsickling of red blood cells.

   
Released: 22-Jun-2023 7:05 AM EDT
Novel genetic scoring system helps determine ALS disease risk
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A newly created polygenic scoring system — one that weighs the combined effects of common genetic variants — can improve the ability to predict an individual’s risk of developing ALS, a study shows.

Newswise: Loss of Y Chromosome in Men Enables Cancer to Grow
Released: 21-Jun-2023 12:45 PM EDT
Loss of Y Chromosome in Men Enables Cancer to Grow
Cedars-Sinai

As men age, some of their cells lose the very thing that makes them biological males—the Y chromosome—and this loss hampers the body’s ability to fight cancer, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Cancer.

Released: 21-Jun-2023 12:10 PM EDT
UC Irvine-led researchers reveal new molecular mechanism for stimulating hair growth
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2023 — The process by which aged, or senescent, pigment-making cells in the skin cause significant growth of hair inside skin moles, called nevi, has been identified by a research team led by the University of California, Irvine. The discovery may offer a road map for an entirely new generation of molecular therapies for androgenetic alopecia, a common form of hair loss in both women and men.

Newswise: 2023 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize Honors Pioneer in Computational Biology
Released: 20-Jun-2023 8:00 AM EDT
2023 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize Honors Pioneer in Computational Biology
Harvard Medical School

The 2023 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize has been awarded to scientist David J. Lipman for his visionary work in the conception, design, and implementation of computational tools, databases, and infrastructure that transformed the way biological information is analyzed and accessed freely and rapidly around the world.



close
2.21312