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Newswise: Nanoparticles enhance gene therapies for eye disease
Released: 14-Aug-2020 4:35 PM EDT
Nanoparticles enhance gene therapies for eye disease
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers have created nanoparticles for successful gene therapy of a mouse model of macular degeneration. The nanoparticle carriers have the potential to significantly expand the effectiveness of gene therapies for human eye diseases, including blindness.

Released: 14-Aug-2020 2:30 PM EDT
UW team developing model to help lower COVID-19 infections in Seattle, other major cities
University of Washington

A UW team has received a grant to develop a model that uses local data to generate policy recommendations that could help lower COVID-19 infections in King County, which includes Seattle.

Newswise: Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
Released: 14-Aug-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
UC Davis Health

Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. Offspring sex may also interact with maternal immune conditions to influence outcomes, particularly in terms of a child’s cognition.

Newswise: locustsensor.jpg
Released: 14-Aug-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has determined that locusts can smell explosives and determine where the smells originated — an important step in engineering cyborg bomb-sniffing locusts.

Newswise: Supercomputers Help Uncover 'Noisy' Neutron Star Collisions
Released: 14-Aug-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Supercomputers Help Uncover 'Noisy' Neutron Star Collisions
University of California San Diego

A series of simulations using multiple supercomputers, including Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego, suggests that when the neutron stars’ masses are different enough, the result is far noisier. The models predicted an electromagnetic ‘bang,’ which isn't present when the merging stars' masses are similar, according to researchers.

Newswise: Military medical sponsors award manufacturing development contract to NuShores Biosciences for bone regeneration technology
Released: 13-Aug-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Military medical sponsors award manufacturing development contract to NuShores Biosciences for bone regeneration technology
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock has received state and federal approval to award a services contract to NuShores Biosciences LLC for Generation 1 manufacturing of the NuCress bone void filler scaffold products. This contract is funded by a $5.6 million grant awarded by the Department of Defense to UA Little Rock in 2019.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Research to Prevent Blindness and Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology Announce 2021 Recipient of RPB David F. Weeks Award for Outstanding Vision Research
Research to Prevent Blindness

David Williams, PhD, has been selected as the 2021 RPB David F. Weeks Award for Outstanding Vision Research. The Weeks Award, funded through the generosity of Research to Prevent Blindness, an anonymous donor, and the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, annually recognizes and celebrates an excellent vision researcher.

Newswise: Genetic mutation may hold answers to controlled breathing
Released: 13-Aug-2020 8:20 AM EDT
Genetic mutation may hold answers to controlled breathing
University of Warwick

The protein Connexin 26 has been previously identified as being directly sensitive to Carbon dioxide and linked to conditions such as KIDS syndrome and deafness.

Newswise: When you’re smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
11-Aug-2020 11:00 PM EDT
When you’re smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
University of South Australia

From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile – how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles.

Newswise: “Reelin” In A New Treatment For Multiple Sclerosis
Released: 12-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT
“Reelin” In A New Treatment For Multiple Sclerosis
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Aug. 12, 2020 – In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the amount of a protein made in the liver significantly protected against development of the disease’s characteristic symptoms and promoted recovery in symptomatic animals, UTSW scientists report.

Newswise: Short-Term Use of HIV-Prevention Medication Protects At-Risk Men on Vacation
Released: 12-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Short-Term Use of HIV-Prevention Medication Protects At-Risk Men on Vacation
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Men at particular risk for HIV are very likely to consistently take prevention medication during vacations when their odds of contracting the virus are higher, according to a new study.

Released: 12-Aug-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Grant boosts psychosocial care resources during COVID-19 pandemic
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The Simms/Mann-UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology has received a $50,000 grant from Los Angeles-based PHASE ONE Foundation to support psychosocial care for people with cancer, their families and frontline healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons
Released: 12-Aug-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Up to one-third of physicians reported sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by clinical care guidelines, a new study led by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers finds. Routine use of ultrasounds to detect cancerous thyroid nodules have led to a significant increase in thyroid cancer cases in recent years, although many are low-risk and unlikely to cause serious harm.

Released: 12-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Rutgers Researchers Awarded $20 Million NIH Grant to Find New Ways to Diagnose Tuberculosis
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers researchers have been awarded a $20 million grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to evaluate new point of care tests that would diagnose Tuberculosis, the number one cause of deaths worldwide due to an infectious disease.

Newswise: Natural way to boost crop yield to be explored by Warwick Scientists
Released: 12-Aug-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Natural way to boost crop yield to be explored by Warwick Scientists
University of Warwick

Increases in plant yield could be naturally made thanks to research at the School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick

Released: 11-Aug-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice.

Newswise: zach-Reagh_headshot.png
Released: 11-Aug-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Aging memories may not be ‘worse,’ just ‘different’
Washington University in St. Louis

“Older adults might be representing events in different ways, and transitions might be picked up differently than, say, a 20-year-old,” said Zachariah Reagh, assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences. Reagh looked at fMRI images to study memory differences in different age groups.

Newswise:Video Embedded multifocal-contact-lenses-slow-myopia-progression-in-children
VIDEO
6-Aug-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings support an option for controlling the condition, also called nearsightedness, which increases the risk of cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment later in life. Investigators of the Bifocal Lenses In Nearsighted Kids (BLINK) Study published the results August 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Newswise: Immunotherapy-Resistant Cancers Eliminated in Mouse Study
10-Aug-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Immunotherapy-Resistant Cancers Eliminated in Mouse Study
Washington University in St. Louis

In a mouse study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that an antibody that targets the protein TREM2 empowers tumor-destroying immune cells and improves the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy.

Released: 11-Aug-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Understanding ‘Chemo Brain’ in Children: Researchers Secure $4.6 Million NIH Grant to Identify Those at Risk
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Chemotherapy usually cures children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but the treatment may hamper brain development and impact key cognitive functions including sensory processing, memory, and attention. Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM), and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have received a five-year, $4.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to determine how chemotherapy exerts its damaging effects on the brain. Their long-term objective is to use this information to develop protective interventions that can prevent permanent harm.

7-Aug-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Excess Weight Among Pregnant Women May Interfere With Child’s Developing Brain
NYU Langone Health

Obesity in expectant mothers may hinder the development of the babies’ brains as early as the second trimester, a new study finds.

7-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Study Pinpoints Five Most Likely Causes of Post-Traumatic Stress in Police Officers
NYU Langone Health

A combination of genetic and emotional differences may lead to post-traumatic stress (PTS) in police officers, a new study finds.

Newswise: Analysis of Ugandan cervical carcinomas, an aid for understudied sub-Saharan women
Released: 10-Aug-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Analysis of Ugandan cervical carcinomas, an aid for understudied sub-Saharan women
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Cervical cancer kills over 300,000 women a year, and 19 of the 20 nations with the highest death rates are sub-Saharan countries. Now an international team has published the first comprehensive genomic study of cervical cancers in sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on tumors from 212 Ugandans.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Non-Fasting Blood Test Can Help Screen Youth for Prediabetes and Diabetes
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A simple blood test that does not require overnight fasting has been found to be an accurate screening tool for identifying youth at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk later in life.

Newswise: Retesting for COVID-19: UPMC Shares its Experience
Released: 10-Aug-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Retesting for COVID-19: UPMC Shares its Experience
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

In the first large, multicenter analysis of its kind, the 40-hospital UPMC health system today reported its findings on clinician-directed retesting of patients for presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Confused by whole grain labels on food packaging? Study finds you’re not alone.
5-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Confused by whole grain labels on food packaging? Study finds you’re not alone.
Tufts University

Whole grain labels are confusing to consumers, according to a new study that found many made the wrong choice when asked to pick the healthier option based on product labels. The researchers, from Tufts University and NYU, say the results provide legal evidence for changes in labeling policies.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 7:25 AM EDT
GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism
UC Davis Health

A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. According to the study, published Aug. 6 in Autism Research, these GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism.

7-Aug-2020 10:05 AM EDT
New Approach to Treating Osteoarthritis Advances
NYU Langone Health

Injections of a natural “energy” molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows.

Newswise: Supercomputers Simulate Environmental Changes in Chesapeake Bay
Released: 7-Aug-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Supercomputers Simulate Environmental Changes in Chesapeake Bay
University of California San Diego

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) researchers used supercomputer simulations to examine impacts of both regional and global changes affecting the Chesapeake Bay. They discovered that historical increases in fertilizers and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have forced the bay to behave increasingly like a small sea on a continental shelf rather than a traditional estuary.

Newswise: Wayne State receives DOE grant to develop catalysts for renewable energy generation
Released: 7-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Wayne State receives DOE grant to develop catalysts for renewable energy generation
Wayne State University Division of Research

This research will focus on the development of efficient electrochemical systems for energy generation and storage. The proposed work will have a significant impact on the development of efficient energy conversion systems.

Newswise: Pinpointing The Cells That Keep The Body’s Master Circadian Clock Ticking
5-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Pinpointing The Cells That Keep The Body’s Master Circadian Clock Ticking
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Aug. 7, 2020 – UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice. The method, described online in the journal Neuron, gives new insight into which brain cells are important in maintaining the body’s master circadian clock. But they say the approach will also be broadly useful for answering questions about the daily rhythms of cells throughout the body.

Newswise: UAH gets $1.1 million grant as lead in research on safe use of drones in disasters
Released: 6-Aug-2020 4:45 PM EDT
UAH gets $1.1 million grant as lead in research on safe use of drones in disasters
University of Alabama Huntsville

The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) will receive $1.1 million of the $3.3 million in research, education and training grants awarded to universities that comprise the Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE).

Newswise: New Science Behind Algae-based Flip-flops
Released: 6-Aug-2020 2:35 PM EDT
New Science Behind Algae-based Flip-flops
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers formulated polyurethane foams, made from algae oil, to meet commercial specifications for midsole shoes and the foot-bed of flip-flops. Their latest result, in a series of recent research publications, offers a complete solution to the plastics problem—at least for polyurethanes.

Newswise:Video Embedded targeted-ultrasound-for-noninvasive-diagnosis-of-brain-cancer
VIDEO
Released: 6-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Targeted ultrasound for noninvasive diagnosis of brain cancer
Washington University in St. Louis

Brain tumors are typically diagnosed using MRI imaging, as taking a sample for a tissue biopsy is risky and may not be possible due to tumor location or a patient's health. Researchers are developing a method to diagnose brain tumors without any incisions.

Released: 6-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Outside Looking In: Study Shows Variation in Hospital Visitor & ICU Communication Policies Due to COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study documents how 49 hospitals in a state hit hard by COVID-19 changed their visitor policies and communications with families of intensive care unit patients in the first months of the pandemic -- and how those efforts varied. Virtually all hospitals put in place a “no visitors” blanket policy, but 59% of them did allow some exceptions to this rule.

Released: 6-Aug-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers discover sex-specific differences in neural mechanisms for glucose regulation
Tufts University

Researchers from Tufts have discovered neural mechanisms in mice specific to females that switch estrogen from playing a protective role in glucose metabolism to a disruptive role. The discovery could provide clues to the increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes among post-menopausal women.

Newswise: Non-Invasive Nerve Stimulation Boosts Learning of Foreign Language Sounds
3-Aug-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Non-Invasive Nerve Stimulation Boosts Learning of Foreign Language Sounds
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Pittsburgh and UC San Francisco (UCSF) revealed that a simple, earbud-like device developed at UCSF that imperceptibly stimulates a key nerve leading to the brain could significantly improve the wearer’s ability to learn sounds of a new language.

Released: 5-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Cancer Research Institute Awards $30.2 Million in Grants and Fellowships to Support Basic and Clinical Research in Immunology and Cancer Immunotherapy
Cancer Research Institute

The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), a U.S. nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and development of powerful immunotherapies for all cancers, awarded more than $30.2 million in research grants and fellowships in the 2020 fiscal year ending June 30, 2020.

Newswise: Fermilab scientist Laura Fields receives $2.5 million DOE award to study beams of shape-shifting ghost particles
Released: 5-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Fermilab scientist Laura Fields receives $2.5 million DOE award to study beams of shape-shifting ghost particles
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Laura Fields has won an Early Career Research Award from the Department of Energy to help physicists better understand the composition of neutrino beams used by Fermilab experiments. Her work will help gather and validate results that could shed light on why the universe consists of something rather than nothing.

3-Aug-2020 5:00 PM EDT
Perfectly Balanced: The Yin and Yang of Inflammation Controlled By A Single Molecule
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections

Newswise: Scientists discover novel drug target for pancreatic cancer
4-Aug-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Scientists discover novel drug target for pancreatic cancer
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have uncovered a novel drug target, a protein called PPP1R1B, that stops the deadly spread of pancreatic cancer, called metastasis, when inhibited in mice. Published in Gastroenterology, the findings are a first step toward a potential treatment for one of the deadliest cancers known today.

Released: 5-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Research to Prevent Blindness and American Academy of Ophthalmology Award Grants for Big Data Research to Improve Patient Care
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) today announced the recipients of the Research to Prevent Blindness/American Academy of Ophthalmology Award for IRIS® Registry Research.

Newswise: NAU scientists partner in $26 million NSF initiative to establish new Center for Quantum Networks
Released: 5-Aug-2020 7:20 AM EDT
NAU scientists partner in $26 million NSF initiative to establish new Center for Quantum Networks
Northern Arizona University

In its first NSF Engineering Research Center collaboration, NAU will receive nearly $2 million in funding as a CQN contributing partner in the areas of research, education and workforce development.

3-Aug-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Men Scoring Higher on ’Man Box’ Scale are Prone to Violence, Mental Illness
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Study finds that men who harbor more harmful attitudes about masculinity – including beliefs about aggression and homophobia – also tend toward bullying, sexual harassment, depression and suicidal thoughts.

Newswise: Study: Enzyme Could Prove Effective in Treating Tumors and Inflammatory Diseases in Lung
Released: 4-Aug-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Study: Enzyme Could Prove Effective in Treating Tumors and Inflammatory Diseases in Lung
Henry Ford Health System

Findings from a research study, led by scientists at Henry Ford, suggest an enzyme could play an important role in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases in the airway.

Newswise:  UCLA researchers receive $2.97 million grant to develop test for early detection of liver cancer
Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:40 AM EDT
UCLA researchers receive $2.97 million grant to develop test for early detection of liver cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCAL researchers are developing a nanotechnology-enabled cancer diagnostic solution that will help detect early stage liver cancer for people who are at risk of developing the disease.

Newswise: Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Penn Medicine Receives $4.9 Million Grant to Improve Uptake of Cancer Care Best Practices
Released: 4-Aug-2020 12:05 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Receives $4.9 Million Grant to Improve Uptake of Cancer Care Best Practices
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new grant awarded to the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will help identify methods to improve uptake of state-of-the-science care that can have a significant impact for patients.


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