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Newswise: Study Finds Dosing Strategy May Affect Immunotherapy Outcomes
Released: 14-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Dosing Strategy May Affect Immunotherapy Outcomes
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 14, 2021 – Overweight cancer patients receiving immunotherapy treatments live more than twice as long as lighter patients, but only when dosing is weight-based, according to a study by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jun-2021 12:05 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Jun-2021 7:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: AVG-graphics-2Record.jpg
Released: 11-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Improving dialysis through design
Washington University in St. Louis

Faculty from the McKelvey School of Engineering and the School of Medicine teamed up to design better grafts for dialysis patients.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Financial toxicity associated with cancer care impacts nearly 50% of women with gynecologic cancer
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers report on how a diverse cohort of gynecologic cancer patients are affected by financial distress, also called “financial toxicity” in acknowledgment of the health hazards it can pose, in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer.

Newswise: Study finds brain areas involved in seeking information about bad possibilities
9-Jun-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Study finds brain areas involved in seeking information about bad possibilities
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the brain regions involved in choosing whether to find out if a bad event is about to happen.

Newswise: Tulane wins share of $35 million Department of Energy clean energy grant
Released: 9-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Tulane wins share of $35 million Department of Energy clean energy grant
Tulane University

Tulane University will share in a U.S. Department of Energy award designed to advance new technologies to decarbonize the biorefining processes used to convert organic material, such as plant matter, into fuel.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
DOE Awards $54 Million to 235 American Small Businesses Developing Novel Clean Energy And Climate Solutions
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced 235 small businesses, across 42 states, will receive $54 million in critical seed funding for 266 projects that are developing and deploying proof-of-concept prototypes for a wide range of technological solutions needed to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:15 PM EDT
NSF to Fund Research on ‘Boundary Spanning’ in Ph.D. Studies
Cornell University

Diversification is good for one’s stock portfolio, but is it a good idea for doctoral studies? A five-year, $2.45 million grant from the National Science Foundation will help researchers from three institutions seek the answer.

Newswise: Not Just A Phase For RNAS
Released: 9-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Not Just A Phase For RNAS
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 9, 2021 – A phenomenon in which an RNA named NORAD drives a protein named Pumilio to form liquid droplets in cells, much like oil in water, appears to tightly regulate the activity of Pumilio. A new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests that such RNA-driven “phase separation,” in turn, protects against genome instability, premature aging, and neurodegenerative diseases, and may represent a previously unrecognized way for RNAs to regulate cellular processes.

Released: 8-Jun-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Department of Energy Announces $6.4 Million for Research on International Fusion Energy Facilities
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $6.4 million in funding for U.S. scientists to carry out seven research projects at two major fusion energy facilities located in Germany and Japan.

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Embargo will expire: 15-Jun-2021 12:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 8-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT

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8-Jun-2021 6:00 AM EDT
PhRMA Foundation Announces 2021 Value Assessment Research Award Recipients and 2022 Funding Opportunity
PhRMA Foundation

The PhRMA Foundation has announced the recipients of its 2021 Value Assessment Research Awards. A total of $300,000 was awarded to three teams whose proposals put forward new, innovative strategies for assessing the value of medicines and health care services.

Newswise: high-throughput-3D-bioprinter-1.png
Released: 7-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Super productive 3D bioprinter could help speed up drug development
University of California San Diego

A new 3D bioprinter developed by UC San Diego nanoengineers operates at record speed—it can print a 96-well array of living human tissue samples within 30 minutes. The technology could help accelerate high-throughput preclinical drug screening and make it less costly.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:55 PM EDT
Department of Energy Announces $1 Million in Collaborative Funding for Privacy-Preserving Artificial Intelligence Research
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $1 million for collaborations in privacy-preserving artificial intelligence research. The aim of this funding is to bring together researchers from the DOE National Laboratories and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to jointly develop new flagship datasets and privacy-preserving methods and algorithms to improve healthcare.

Newswise: Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
Released: 7-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
University of California San Diego

A new technology could dramatically improve the safety and performance of lithium-ion batteries that operate with gas electrolytes at ultra-low temperatures. By keeping electrolytes from vaporizing, the technology can prevent pressure buildup inside the battery that leads to swelling and explosions.

Newswise: Analysis reveals how kidney cancer develops and responds to treatment
3-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Analysis reveals how kidney cancer develops and responds to treatment
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

By sequencing the RNA of individual cells within multiple benign and cancerous kidney tumors, researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have identified the cells from which different subtypes originate, the pathways involved and how the tumor microenvironment impacts cancer development and response to treatment.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
New Potential Therapy for Fatty Liver Disease
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

In a subset of patients with partial lipodystrophy and/or NASH, the hormone leptin can be leveraged as a therapeutic agent to move fat out of the liver.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 6:05 AM EDT
To Train a Scientist
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center is using a grant from the American Cancer Society to introduce more underrepresented minority undergraduate students to cancer research

4-Jun-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Global travelers pick up numerous genes that promote microbial resistance
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that international travelers often return home with new bacterial strains jostling for position among the thousands that normally reside within the gut microbiome. Such travel is contributing to the rapid global increase and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Newswise: Wayne State physics professor awarded DOE Early Career Research Program grant
Released: 4-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Wayne State physics professor awarded DOE Early Career Research Program grant
Wayne State University Division of Research

Chun Shen, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics and astronomy in Wayne State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, was awarded a five-year, $750,000 award from the U.S. Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program for his project, “Quantitative Characterization of Emerging Quark-Gluon Plasma Properties with Dynamical Fluctuations and Small Systems.”

Released: 4-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Gift to establish K. Lisa Yang Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell University

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Center for Conservation Bioacoustics will begin a new era of innovation thanks to a major gift from the philanthropist and Lab Advisory Board member K. Lisa Yang.

Newswise: NASA Awards The University of Texas at El Paso $2 Million Grant
Released: 4-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
NASA Awards The University of Texas at El Paso $2 Million Grant
University of Texas at El Paso

The University of Texas at El Paso has earned a $2 million grant from NASA to develop technologies to mine ice on the moon for future deep space exploration.

Newswise: Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
UC Davis Health

A new study shows that two-thirds of Californians don’t know about a law designed to prevent a person at risk of hurting themselves or others from possessing or purchasing firearms or ammunition. More than 80% of survey participants were supportive once they read about this law.

Newswise: Giving Brown Fat A Boost to Fight Type 2 Diabetes
Released: 4-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Giving Brown Fat A Boost to Fight Type 2 Diabetes
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 4, 2021 – Increasing a protein concentrated in brown fat appears to lower blood sugar, promote insulin sensitivity, and protect against fatty liver disease by remodeling white fat to a healthier state, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The finding, published online in Nature Communications, could eventually lead to new solutions for patients with diabetes and related conditions.

Newswise: UTHealth professor awarded CPRIT grant for research training program
Released: 4-Jun-2021 9:30 AM EDT
UTHealth professor awarded CPRIT grant for research training program
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Zhongming Zhao, PhD, MS, with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), has been awarded nearly $4 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to provide research training to help with cancer prevention.

Newswise: New research may offer hope for Alzheimer's patients
Released: 4-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
New research may offer hope for Alzheimer's patients
University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky Neuroscience Professor Greg Gerhardt's new research program will provide answers to long-standing questions about the role of neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. A culmination of his nearly 40 years of brain research, Gerhardt's study could help to develop new treatments for the disease.

Newswise: Studies reveal skull as unexpected source of brain immunity
2-Jun-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Studies reveal skull as unexpected source of brain immunity
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the immune cells that protect the brain and spinal cord come primarily from the skull. The finding opens up the possibility of developing therapies to target such cells as a way to prevent or treat brain conditions.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Novel Research Will Track Lead Residues Across Four Continents
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Abby Kinchy, a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will seek to learn how can people try to reduce the harms caused by lead in the soil of their communities with the support of a Scholars Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Newswise: Zhu-figure.jpg?w=600&h=400&auto=format&q=60&fit=crop
Released: 3-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
New method predicts chemotherapy effectiveness after one treatment
Washington University in St. Louis

Interdisciplinary team finds combining certain data after a patient's first treatment can predict how a tumor will respond to chemotherapy.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Researchers discover potential new approach to treating psoriatic joint inflammation
UC Davis Health

An international team of researchers, led by UC Davis Health, developed a new therapeutic approach to treating psoriatic arthritis, a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints.

1-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Predictive Model Identifies Patients for Genetic Testing
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Patients who, perhaps unbeknownst to their health care providers, are in need of genetic testing for rare undiagnosed diseases can be identified en masse based on routine information in electronic health records (EHRs), a research team reported today in the journal Nature Medicine.

2-Jun-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Researchers Find Evidence That Diet Can Alter the Microbiome to Affect Breast Cancer Risk
Wake Forest Baptist Health

New research shows that diet, including fish oil supplements, can alter not only the breast microbiome, but also breast cancer tumors. The study appears online in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Newswise: Scientists make powerful underwater glue inspired by barnacles and mussels
27-May-2021 11:05 PM EDT
Scientists make powerful underwater glue inspired by barnacles and mussels
Tufts University

Scientists replicate the molecular properties of the natural cement used by barnacles and mussels to create a powerful adhesive using silk protein. The new adhesive can work well in both dry and underwater conditions.

Newswise: LJI launches new global cancer immunology resource
Released: 2-Jun-2021 1:55 PM EDT
LJI launches new global cancer immunology resource
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health has granted over $4.2 million to launch the Cancer Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (CEDAR), led by La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) Professors Alessandro Sette, Dr. Biol. Sci., and Bjoern Peters, Ph.D.

Newswise: UM Avenir Award Recipient to Leverage Telehealth to Reach Injection Drug Users
Released: 2-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
UM Avenir Award Recipient to Leverage Telehealth to Reach Injection Drug Users
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The $2.3 million, four-year Avenir Award will support his innovative research project, “Tele-Harm Reduction for Rapid Initiation of Antiretrovirals in People Who Inject Drugs: A Randomized Controlled Trial.”

Released: 2-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Patients Taking Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Respond Less Well to COVID-19 Vaccine
NYU Langone Health

One-quarter of people who take the drug methotrexate for common immune system disorders — from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis — mount a weaker immune response to a COVID-19 vaccine, a new study shows.

Released: 1-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Pandemic Purchasing Exacerbates Inequities in Urban Freight
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

With the support of a $325,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will develop mathematical models that allow them to study how this urban freight gap could be closed. Among other issues, they will consider the potential effects of traffic network and route reconfiguration, the sustainability of offering free or low shipping fees, and the supply chain costs associated with healthy food items. They will also explore what policies could support equitable market change.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-research-could-lead-to-treatment-for-aortic-aneurysms
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
New research could lead to treatment for aortic aneurysms
University of Kentucky

Thanks to a $5.6 million grant from the NIH, a University of Kentucky College of Medicine team will study the culprit behind thoracic aortic aneurysms, which could lead to a treatment for the potentially deadly disease.

Newswise: Light-shrinking material lets ordinary microscope see in super resolution
Released: 1-Jun-2021 12:00 AM EDT
Light-shrinking material lets ordinary microscope see in super resolution
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego engineers developed a technology that turns a conventional light microscope into what's called a super-resolution microscope. It improves the microscope's resolution (from 200 nm to 40 nm) so that it can be used to directly observe finer structures and details in living cells.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-tool-activates-deep-brain-neurons-by-combining-ultrasound-genetics
VIDEO
Released: 28-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
New tool activates deep brain neurons by combining ultrasound, genetics
Washington University in St. Louis

A team at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a new brain stimulation technique using focused ultrasound that is able to turn specific types of neurons in the brain on and off and precisely control motor activity without surgical device implantation.

Newswise: Same Difference: Two Halves of The Hippocampus Have Different Gene Activity
Released: 28-May-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Same Difference: Two Halves of The Hippocampus Have Different Gene Activity
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 28, 2021 – A study of gene activity in the brain’s hippocampus, led by UT Southwestern researchers, has identified marked differences between the region’s anterior and posterior portions. The findings, published today in Neuron, could shed light on a variety of brain disorders that involve the hippocampus and may eventually help lead to new, targeted treatments.

Released: 27-May-2021 8:05 PM EDT
$1.5M gift will support grapevine research at Cornell AgriTech
Cornell University

An anonymous gift will improve grapevine health, quality, yields and profitability in the New York state wine and grape industry through the creation of a graduate student research fellowship program.

Released: 27-May-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Grant expands Cornell efforts to reach New York farmworkers
Cornell University

As COVID-19 bore down on New York state, the Cornell Farmworker Program used mobile phone technology to provide rapid guidance and clear health information in multiple languages to the state’s farmworkers. Now, new federal funding will expand the program and further integrate the initiative with Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE).

Newswise: LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
Released: 27-May-2021 6:05 PM EDT
LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) is partnering with Synbal, Inc., a preclinical biotechnology company based in San Diego, CA, to develop multi-gene, humanized mouse models for COVID-19 research. The research at LJI will be led by Professor Sujan Shresta, Ph.D., a member of the Institute’s Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research.

Newswise: Two Henry Samueli School of Engineering scientists win DOE early career awards
Released: 27-May-2021 5:30 PM EDT
Two Henry Samueli School of Engineering scientists win DOE early career awards
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 27, 2021 — The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded funding to two University of California, Irvine scientists under its DOE Early Career Research Program. Mohammad Abdolhosseini Qomi, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Penghui Cao, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, were among 83 researchers selected from university and national laboratory applicants to receive the research awards.

Released: 27-May-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Levels of Certain Blood Proteins May Explain Why Some People Derive More Benefits from Exercise than Others
Beth Israel Lahey Health

A new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) provides insights into the mechanistic links between physical fitness and overall health, as well as the reasons why the same exercise can have different effects in different people.

Released: 27-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
DOE Awards $100 Million to Early-Career Scientists for Mission-Critical Research
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of 83 scientists who will receive a total of $100 million in funding through its Early Career Research Program.

Newswise: Building better bubbles for ultrasound could enhance image quality, facilitate treatments
Released: 26-May-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Building better bubbles for ultrasound could enhance image quality, facilitate treatments
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers are investigating long-lasting, customizable nanobubbles for ultrasound contrast agents.

Newswise: Electric fish — and humans — pause before communicating key points
Released: 26-May-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Electric fish — and humans — pause before communicating key points
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals an underlying mechanism for how pauses allow neurons in the midbrain to recover from stimulation.

24-May-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Brain tumors caused by normal neuron activity in mice predisposed to such tumors
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Stanford University School of Medicine have found that normal exposure to light can drive the formation and growth of optic nerve tumors in mice — and maybe people — with a genetic predisposition. Such tumors can lead to vision loss.


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