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Released: 13-Jul-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Fundamental Exploration Into Future Clean Energy Technologies Receives DOE Support
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The U.S. Department of Energy recently awarded $65 million in grants to support research that will advance safe, reliable, and clean nuclear energy. Among those projects are two led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, which received a combined total of $1.2 million.

Newswise: Single-Dose Flu Drug Reduces Spread Within Households
Released: 13-Jul-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Single-Dose Flu Drug Reduces Spread Within Households
University of Virginia Health System

Only 1.9% of uninfected household contacts who took a single dose of baloxavir marboxil came down with the flu.

9-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Mind the gap: Even the richest Americans lag the English on health, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study shows that middle-aged people living in the U.S. today have worse health than their English counterparts – and that the difference in health between rich and poor is much larger on the American side of the Atlantic.

Newswise: 7.13.2020WaunShaeOld_Hands__Elderly_GettyImages-962094878.jpg
Released: 13-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Family Caregiving May Not Harm Health of Caregivers After All
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help.

Released: 13-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Training Receives $5 Million NIH Grant to Continue Innovative Work
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

The National Institutes of Health has renewed a five-year grant for $5 million for the Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Training (AR3T) to continue its work expanding scientific knowledge, expertise and methodologies focused on science and regenerative medicine.

Newswise: Monell Scientist Receives 2020 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in Neuroscience
Released: 13-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Monell Scientist Receives 2020 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in Neuroscience
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Amber Alhadeff, PhD, the newest faculty member at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, has been awarded a 2020 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in Neurosciences, totaling $225,000 over three years.

Newswise: Perceiving the Flavor of Fat: Monell Center Twins Study Finds Genetic Variation Shapes Individual Perception of Fatty Foods
Released: 13-Jul-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Perceiving the Flavor of Fat: Monell Center Twins Study Finds Genetic Variation Shapes Individual Perception of Fatty Foods
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Liking of fatty food is more complex than its fat content alone – it could also be related to inborn genetic traits of the consumer related to fat perception.

Newswise: Drug that calms ‘cytokine storm’ associated with 45% lower risk of dying among COVID-19 patients on ventilators
Released: 13-Jul-2020 7:25 AM EDT
Drug that calms ‘cytokine storm’ associated with 45% lower risk of dying among COVID-19 patients on ventilators
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Critically ill COVID-19 patients who received a single dose of a drug that calms an overreacting immune system were 45% less likely to die overall, and more likely to be out of the hospital or off a ventilator one month after treatment, compared with those who didn’t receive the drug, according to a new observational study.

Newswise: Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
Released: 13-Jul-2020 6:15 AM EDT
Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
Keck Medicine of USC

A Keck Medicine of USC study reveals that kappa opioids, a significantly less addictive opioid, may preserve cartilage in joints and ease pain

Released: 12-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Military Personnel at Risk of Suicide Store Firearms Unsafely
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Military personnel who are at a greater risk of suicide are more likely to unsafely store firearms in unlocked cabinets where they can access them easily, according to a Rutgers researcher.

Newswise: Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats—like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus—to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in developing solutions responsive to the unprecedented threats to quality standards of care delivery is required.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
University of Virginia Health System

The new discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called "microfibrils."

Newswise: $18M Boost to Materials Science Research at UC San Diego
Released: 9-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
$18M Boost to Materials Science Research at UC San Diego
University of California San Diego

The National Science Foundation has awarded University of California San Diego researchers a six-year $18 million grant to fund a new Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC).

Newswise:Video Embedded breast-cancer-cells-turn-killer-immune-cells-into-allies
VIDEO
6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Turn Killer Immune Cells Into Allies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
9-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body. They propose that therapies targeting this process could be developed to halt or prevent metastasis and reduce breast cancer deaths.

Newswise: Queen’s part of £7 million consortium to improve outcomes for patients with early stage cancer
Released: 9-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Queen’s part of £7 million consortium to improve outcomes for patients with early stage cancer
Queen's University Belfast

The Precision Medicine Centre of Excellence (PMC) at Queen’s is leading a ground-breaking collaboration with the world’s largest biotech company Roche, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) specialist, Sonrai Analytics.

8-Jul-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New $3.7M grant to support research exploring mysterious link between cancer, HIV/AIDS
Case Western Reserve University

Research has found that those living with HIV have a higher risk for certain kinds of cancers—such as lung cancer. Now, with a new five-year, $3.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, researchers from Case Western Reserve University hope to find out why.

Newswise: Yale Cancer Center Awarded NIH SPORE Renewal for Lung Cancer Research
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Yale Cancer Center Awarded NIH SPORE Renewal for Lung Cancer Research
Yale Cancer Center

Yale Cancer Center researchers were awarded a $11 million grant renewal from the National institutes of Health to fund the Yale Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Lung Cancer.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers propose novel approach to limit organ damage, improve outcomes for patients with severe COVID-19
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a paper published in Cancer and Metastasis Reviews, a team of researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Brigham and Women’s Hospital propose that controlling the local and systemic inflammatory response in COVID-19 may be as important as anti-viral and other therapies.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Researcher Receives NIH Award to Study Immune Responses of Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases in the Setting of COVID-19 Infection
Mount Sinai Health System

The study will aim to understand whether systemic medications and biologics, such as dupilumab—a monoclonal antibody that binds to an inflammatory molecule, IL-4 receptor alfa, and inhibits the inflammatory response that leads to rashes and itching from atopic dermatitis/eczema—may have a positive or negative impact on COVID-19 responses in patients who have the disease.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Healthier School Food and Physical Activity Environments Matter for Childhood Obesity
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

School food choices and number of physical activity facilities are associated with students’ BMI, Rutgers study finds

Newswise: Making a Material Impact
Released: 8-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Making a Material Impact
University of Delaware

It’s called CHARM—the University of Delaware’s new Center for Hybrid, Active and Responsive Materials. It will drive fundamental materials science research and enable critical innovations in biomedicine, security, sensing and more.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Addressing the toxicity of cancer treatment costs
Wayne State University Division of Research

With the help of a grant from the American Cancer Society, researchers at Wayne State University are working on a patient-focused intervention to improve patient-provider treatment cost discussion and other patient outcomes related to the financial consequences of cancer treatment.

Newswise: Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
Released: 7-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
University of California San Diego

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used SDSC's Comet supercomputer to validate a model using a machine learning technique called Dynamic Time Lag Regression (DTLR) to help predict the solar wind arrival near the Earth’s orbit from physical parameters of the Sun.

Newswise: University of Miami Miller School Plays Pivotal Role in Securing a $15 Million National Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
University of Miami Miller School Plays Pivotal Role in Securing a $15 Million National Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine investigators play a pivotal role in a consortium of Florida institutions just awarded a $15 million grant to collaborate on Alzheimer’s disease research. The five-year National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging grant brings together top Florida researchers to focus on better understanding how to diagnose, treat, prevent, and potentially cure Alzheimer’s in diverse populations.

Newswise: Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Tulane University

Tulane University, nationally renowned for the care it provides to retired professional athletes through partnerships with the NFL Player Care Foundation and The Trust (Powered by the NFLPA), has received a $12.5 million gift from The Avalon Fund for the creation of the Tulane University Center for Brain Health. The center will specialize in the treatment of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in U.S. military veterans, beginning in the fall of 2020.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Higher Manganese Levels in Early Pregnancy Linked to Lower Preeclampsia Risk
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An analysis of data from more than 1,300 women followed prospectively through pregnancy found that women with lower levels of the essential mineral manganese in early pregnancy were more likely to develop the serious high blood pressure syndrome called preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

7-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Sensory Neurons Outside the Brain Drive Autistic Social Behaviors, Penn Study Suggests
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new study from Penn Medicine lends further evidence that the social behaviors tied to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) emerge from abnormal function of sensory neurons outside the brain.

Newswise: Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists use nanoparticle-delivered gene therapy to limit blinding retinal disease in rodents.

Newswise: Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
DePaul University

A new study published in the journal New Phytologist from a research team led by environmental scientist Bala Chaudhary at DePaul University uncovered previously undiscovered patterns in the dispersal of mycorrhizal fungi that could help ecologists understand how these beneficial fungi travel.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 5:10 PM EDT
DHS Selects George Washington University to Pilot New Center of Excellence in Security Technology Transition
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T announced today the selection of The George Washington University to lead a new COE that will deliver a pilot Master of Business Administration program focused on security technology transition from federal research and development to operational use.

Newswise: A Different Chia-PET Provides Insight Into Prostate Cancer
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:10 PM EDT
A Different Chia-PET Provides Insight Into Prostate Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 6, 2020 – UT Southwestern researchers have identified vast webs of small snippets of the genome that interact with each other and with genes to promote prostate cancer. Their findings, published June 22 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could lead to new ways to treat the most common type of malignancy in American men other than skin cancer.

Newswise: A 360-Degree Approach to Lyme Disease
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
A 360-Degree Approach to Lyme Disease
Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School receives a $5 million gift for Lyme disease research, education

Newswise: Study: Dying Stars Breathe Life Into Earth
6-Jul-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Study: Dying Stars Breathe Life Into Earth
Johns Hopkins University

As dying stars take their final few breaths of life, they gently sprinkle their ashes into the cosmos through the magnificent planetary nebulae. These ashes, spread via stellar winds, are enriched with many different chemical elements, including carbon. Findings from a study published today in Nature Astronomy show that the final breaths of these dying stars, called white dwarfs, shed light on carbon’s origin in the Milky Way.

Released: 3-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Lack of lockdown increased COVID-19 deaths in Sweden
University of Virginia Health System

Sweden’s controversial decision not to lock down during COVID-19 produced more deaths and greater healthcare demand than seen in countries with earlier, more stringent interventions, a new analysis finds.

Newswise: UC San Diego Receives $1.6 Million to Better Prepare Young Adults for Engineering and Technical Careers
Released: 2-Jul-2020 7:45 PM EDT
UC San Diego Receives $1.6 Million to Better Prepare Young Adults for Engineering and Technical Careers
University of California San Diego

Longtime University of California San Diego supporter Buzz Woolley has pledged $1.6 million over the next three years to fund an innovative new initiative that will significantly expand the region’s engineering and technical workforce.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Sniffing Out Smell
Harvard Medical School

Neuroscientists reveal for the first time how relationships between different odors are encoded in the brain. Findings may explain why individuals have common but highly personalized experiences with smell, and inform efforts to understand how odor chemistry is translated into perception.

Newswise: Reverse engineering of 3D printed parts by machine learning 
Reveals security vulnerabilities
Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Reverse engineering of 3D printed parts by machine learning Reveals security vulnerabilities
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Glass- and carbon- fiber reinforced composites, whose use in aerospace and other high-performance applications is soaring. Components made of these materials are often 3D printed. Their strength and flexibility depends on how each layer of fibers is deposited by the printer head, whose layer-by-layer orientation is determined by toolpath instricutions in a component's CAD file. A team of NYU Tandon researchers showed that that 3D printing toolpaths are easy to reproduce — and therefore steal — with machine learning. They demonstrated a method of reverse engineering of a 3D-printed glass fiber reinforced polymer filament that, when 3D-printed, has a dimensional accuracy within one-third of 1% of the original part.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland State University Receive $1.2 Million NIH Award to Recruit Underrepresented Minority Ph.D. Students
Cleveland Clinic

At a time when the national conversation is focused on narrowing the gap of racial equity, two of Cleveland’s anchor institutions have been awarded grant funding that will help them turn words into action. Cleveland State University and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute received a five-year, $1.2 million T32 training award from the National Institutes of Health to recruit underrepresented minority Ph.D. students and students underrepresented in the science and technology workforce.

Newswise: From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Two variants of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), called G614 and D614, were circulating in mid-March. A new study shows that the G version of the virus has come to dominate cases around the world. They report that this mutation does not make the virus more deadly, but it does help the virus copy itself, resulting in a higher viral load, or "titer," in patients.

Newswise: American Cancer Society awards Research Scholar Grant to Brooke Emerling
Released: 2-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
American Cancer Society awards Research Scholar Grant to Brooke Emerling
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute is pleased to announce that the American Cancer Society (ACS) has awarded Brooke Emerling, Ph.D., a Research Scholar Grant to study a new approach to targeting tumors that have a mutation in the p53 gene—the most altered gene in human cancers. The grants are often a career-launching award for “rising stars” in the cancer research arena.

24-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Common Fireworks Release Toxic Metals Into the Air
NYU Langone Health

Some of America’s favorite Independence Day fireworks emit lead, copper, and other toxins, a new study suggests. These metals, which are used to give fireworks their vibrant color, also damage human cells and animal lungs.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 5:30 PM EDT
COVID-19 seed grants awarded to 7 ISU research projects
Iowa State University

Iowa State's COVID-19 Research Seed Grant program will support the initial stages of high-risk/high-reward projects that address the COVID-19 crisis.

Newswise: National Science Foundation Awards $5 Million to Develop Innovative AI Resource
Released: 1-Jul-2020 4:15 PM EDT
National Science Foundation Awards $5 Million to Develop Innovative AI Resource
University of California San Diego

The NSF has awarded the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego a $5 million grant to develop a high-performance resource for conducting artificial intelligence (AI) research across a wide swath of science and engineering domains.

Newswise:Video Embedded engineers-3d-print-sensors-onto-moving-organs
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jul-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Engineers 3D-print sensors onto moving organs
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A new technique funded by NIBIB and developed by University of Minnesota researchers allows 3D printing of hydrogel-based sensors directly on the surface of organs, such as lungs—even as they expand and contract.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:20 PM EDT
COVID-19 Fatality Risk Is Double Earlier Estimates: Study
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

In one of the most robust studies of COVID-19 mortality risk in the United States, researchers estimate an infection fatality rate more than double estimates from other countries, with the greatest risk to older adults. Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health scientists and New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene colleagues published the findings on the pre-print server medRxiv ahead of peer review.

Newswise: New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
29-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Mice that received an injection of a new experimental drug, TAT-DP-2, after a stroke had smaller areas of damage, and their long-term neurological function was better than that of untreated animals.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
CHOP’s Center for Applied Genomics Receives Funding to Study Risk of Disease Specifically in African Americans
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) are among the recipients of a multi-million dollar grant that focuses on the use of genomics to improve risk assessment for diverse populations and integrate the findings into clinical care.

Newswise: Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds
University of Virginia Health System

Exercise can slow or prevent the development of macular degeneration and may benefit other common causes of vision loss, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, new research suggests.

Newswise: Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Scientists at PPPL have gained new insight into a common type of plasma hiccup that interferes with fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality.


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