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Newswise:Video Embedded antibiotic-destroying-genes-widespread-in-bacteria-in-soil-and-on-people
VIDEO
Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Antibiotic-destroying genes widespread in bacteria in soil and on people
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have found that genes that confer the power to destroy tetracycline antibiotics are widespread in bacteria. But the researchers have also created a chemical compound that shields tetracyclines from destruction, restoring the antibiotics lethality. The findings indicate an emerging threat to one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics — but also a promising way to protect against that threat.

Newswise: Lab-Grown Miniature Human Livers Successfully Transplanted in Rats
28-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Lab-Grown Miniature Human Livers Successfully Transplanted in Rats
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Using skin cells from human volunteers, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have created fully functional mini livers, which they then transplanted into rats. In this proof-of-concept experiment, the lab-made organs survived for four days inside their animal hosts.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
UM School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology Awarded Grants to Strengthen COVID-19 Response in Sub-Saharan Africa
University of Maryland Medical Center

The Center for International Health, Education and Biosecurity (Ciheb) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology was awarded $4 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to support coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response activities in Botswana, Nigeria, Malawi, and Mozambique.

26-May-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Older Adults at Higher Risk for Substance Use
New York University

Middle-aged and older adults who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual have higher rates of using certain substances in the past year than those who identify as heterosexual, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU School of Global Public Health.

Newswise: $1M Gift Speeds COVID-19 Testing and Tracking at UC San Diego
Released: 1-Jun-2020 4:15 PM EDT
$1M Gift Speeds COVID-19 Testing and Tracking at UC San Diego
University of California San Diego

A $1M gift from the John and Mary Tu Foundation is accelerating the efforts of UC San Diego translational research virologist Davey Smith to increase the number of people tested for COVID-19, as well as develop new ways to track and treat the virus. Smith and his team are studying how the disease spreads to better inform contact tracing, as well as leading clinical trials to test new drugs for treatment of COVID-19.

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Embargo will expire: 4-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT

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Newswise:Video Embedded study-shows-hydroxychloroquine-s-harmful-effects-on-heart-rhythm
VIDEO
Released: 31-May-2020 11:15 PM EDT
Study Shows Hydroxychloroquine’s Harmful Effects on Heart Rhythm
Georgia Institute of Technology

The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which has been promoted as a potential treatment for Covid-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. Now, a team of researchers has used an optical mapping system to observe exactly how the drug creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat.

Newswise: Study reveals factors influencing outcomes in advanced kidney cancer treated with immunotherapy
28-May-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Study reveals factors influencing outcomes in advanced kidney cancer treated with immunotherapy
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

By analyzing tumors from patients treated with immunotherapy for advanced kidney cancer in three clinical trials, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have identified several features of the tumors that influence their response to immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs.

Released: 28-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood
UC Davis MIND Institute

A UC Davis MIND Institute study found that around 30% of young children with autism have less severe autism symptoms at age 6 than they did at age 3, with some losing their autism diagnoses entirely. It also found that girls tend to show greater reduction and less rise in their autism symptom severity than boys with autism. Children with higher IQs were more likely to show a reduction in their symptoms.

Released: 28-May-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Air Flow Experts Working to Make Sure New Jet Fighters Take Flight — and Land — Safely
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

With the support of a new grant from the Office of Naval Research, aerospace engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are using their extensive knowledge of flow physics to determine how air flow will affect new jet fighters and how that flow can be manipulated or changed for optimal operation.

Newswise: Battling disease with ultraviolet light
Released: 27-May-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Battling disease with ultraviolet light
Penn State College of Engineering

Now and in the months to come, hospitals and commercial buildings will be tasked with sanitizing large indoor environments to prevent the transmission of viruses like SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. A new seed grant-funded study could provide the knowledge base needed to develop optical radiation products used in such large-scale sanitation processes.

Released: 27-May-2020 10:45 AM EDT
A simple and readily available saline solution can reliably transport COVID-19 samples to testing labs
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

In the face of dwindling supplies of virus transport media, cheap and readily available phosphate buffered saline can be used to safely store and transport coronavirus samples for up to 18 hours, reports The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics

Released: 27-May-2020 9:35 AM EDT
Biomedical engineers to test ultraviolet light's ability to kill coronavirus
Binghamton University, State University of New York

The idea of UV sterilization is not a new one, but little or no scientific data about its potency against COVID-19 have been collected, until now. Thanks to a one-year, $182,728 grant from the National Science Foundation, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York are beginning to test UV’s effectiveness.

Newswise: First map of proinsulin’s “social network” reveals new drug target for type 2 diabetes
Released: 27-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
First map of proinsulin’s “social network” reveals new drug target for type 2 diabetes
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have mapped for the first time the vast network of proteins that interact with proinsulin, the protein the body normally processes into insulin. The study, published in Diabetes, also revealed one protein—called PRDX4—that may be essential for proinsulin folding and insulin production. The research suggests that boosting PRDX4 levels may be a novel therapeutic approach to improving the health of people with diabetes.

Newswise: Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services awarded two major research grants
Released: 26-May-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services awarded two major research grants
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Nurse-scientists from the Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute received more than $1.3 million dollars in funding for two separate research projects.

Released: 26-May-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Troublemaking ‘lesion’ singled out in UV-caused skin cancer
University of Washington School of Medicine

Upon exposure to human skin, ultraviolet light from the sun almost instantly generates two types of "lesions" that damage DNA. Scientists at UW Medicine in Seattle determined which of these lesions is responsible for activating a process that may increase cancerous mutations in cells.

26-May-2020 12:15 PM EDT
UCLA receives $1 million for COVID-19 Rapid Response Initiative
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A $1 million gift from the Shurl and Kay Curci Foundation will support the UCLA COVID-19 Rapid Response Initiative, a partnership of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Newswise: Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered in inner ear
Released: 26-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered in inner ear
University of Virginia Health System

New research is shedding light on the biological architecture that lets us hear – and on a genetic disorder that causes both deafness and blindness.

Newswise: The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Receives $4.3M Grant to Launch National Center to Improve Care for People with Disabilities
Released: 26-May-2020 10:40 AM EDT
The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Receives $4.3M Grant to Launch National Center to Improve Care for People with Disabilities
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Through a $4.3 million grant, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) will become a national center dedicated to improving health and function of people with disabilities and their caregivers.

Newswise: Researchers Receive NIH Funds for Adjuvant Research to Boost Coronavirus Vaccines
Released: 26-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Receive NIH Funds for Adjuvant Research to Boost Coronavirus Vaccines
Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, to screen and evaluate certain molecules known as adjuvants that may improve the ability of coronavirus vaccines to stimulate the immune system and generate appropriate responses necessary to protect the general population against the virus.

Newswise: Defects in developing frog brain can be prevented or repaired with bioelectric drugs
22-May-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Defects in developing frog brain can be prevented or repaired with bioelectric drugs
Tufts University

Developing frog embryo brains damaged by nicotine exposure can be repaired by treatment with ionoceutical drugs that restore bioelectric patterns in the embryo, followed by repair of normal anatomy and brain function. The research suggests therapeutic drugs may be used to help repair birth defects.

Newswise: A return to the wild for better immune health
Released: 25-May-2020 7:05 AM EDT
A return to the wild for better immune health
University of Adelaide

A research team led by the University of Adelaide has found that revegetation of green spaces within cities can improve soil microbiota diversity towards a more natural, biodiverse state, which has been linked to human health benefits. In the study, published in the journal Restoration Ecology, researchers compared the composition of a variety of urban green space vegetation types of varying levels of vegetation diversity, including lawns, vacant lots, parklands, revegetated woodlands and remnant woodlands within the City of Playford Council area in South Australia.

Newswise: What we can learn from SARS
Released: 22-May-2020 12:55 PM EDT
What we can learn from SARS
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Seventeen years ago, another viral outbreak was in the news. People wore masks, many were nervous to fly. This outbreak, known as SARS, was caused by a type of coronavirus we now call SARS-CoV-1. The difference was that SARS-CoV-1 was controlled and the virus is all but extinct. The newspaper headlines became a distant memory.

Newswise: Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
19-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have identified a key cell signaling pathway that drives the devastating muscle loss, or cachexia, suffered by many cancer patients. The study, which will be published May 22 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this pathway with a drug already in phase 2 clinical trials for diabetes could prevent this syndrome.

Newswise: UA Little Rock Receives Unprecedented $25 Million Gift for Scholarships and Student Success
Released: 21-May-2020 2:30 PM EDT
UA Little Rock Receives Unprecedented $25 Million Gift for Scholarships and Student Success
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock has received the largest single gift in the institution's 93-year history, announced during the May 21 meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Arkansas. The $25 million gift from an anonymous donor will support the university’s strategic enrollment management plan and help UA Little Rock students achieve a world-class education.

Newswise: $5 million supports research into neglected tropical diseases
Released: 21-May-2020 11:20 AM EDT
$5 million supports research into neglected tropical diseases
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received two grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling more than $5 million to study two types of parasitic worm infection that cause devastating illness in millions of people worldwide. One project will focus on onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness. The second project will target fascioliasis, commonly found in cattle-farming operations.

Released: 20-May-2020 6:05 PM EDT
$5.75M grant to help researchers study role of obesity in development of pancreatic cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A team of researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and peer institutions has been awarded a $5.75 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study the correlation between obesity, inflammation and pancreatic cancer. The scientists hope their findings may help people avoid getting this cancer.

Released: 20-May-2020 5:05 PM EDT
BIDMC-developed vaccines protect against COVID-19 in non-human primates, study finds
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Dan Barouch, MD, PhD (Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, BIDMC) and colleagues reported today in Science two studies of laboratory monkeys that suggest antibodies produced during recovery from COVID-19 provide immunity from the virus, whether triggered by infection or vaccine.

Newswise: University of Illinois Board of Trustees Chair commits $100K for UIC’s frontline health care workers
Released: 20-May-2020 12:25 PM EDT
University of Illinois Board of Trustees Chair commits $100K for UIC’s frontline health care workers
University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Board of Trustees Chairman Don Edwards and his wife, Anne Edwards, have pledged $100,000 to establish the UI Health Employee Relief Fund, which will support health care workers at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System.

Newswise: NCCN Foundation Awards Leading Young Investigators Advancing Cancer Research for Adults and Children
Released: 20-May-2020 8:30 AM EDT
NCCN Foundation Awards Leading Young Investigators Advancing Cancer Research for Adults and Children
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

NCCN and the NCCN Foundation announce five new recipients for the 10th annual NCCN Foundation Young Investigator Awards (YIA) Program, overseen by the NCCN Oncology Research Program (ORP)

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Gives $2 Million to Assist Communities During COVID-19
Released: 19-May-2020 8:10 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Gives $2 Million to Assist Communities During COVID-19
Cedars-Sinai

As COVID-19 causes staggering unemployment across the Los Angeles region, St. John's Well Child & Family Center is getting a vital reprieve. The South Los Angeles nonprofit will receive a $150,000 grant from Cedars-Sinai to retrain members of its staff who would have been furloughed - and to enlist them in the campaign against the novel coronavirus.

Newswise: Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
Released: 19-May-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
UC Davis MIND Institute

Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with typical development show similar proactive cognitive control. However, symptoms of depression in individuals with autism were linked to less proactive control, a UC Davis study found.

Newswise: Protein Shapes Matter in Alzheimer's Research
Released: 19-May-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Protein Shapes Matter in Alzheimer's Research
Michigan Technological University

Even small changes may have big, long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity.

Newswise: New analytic tool designed to help guide precision oncology discovery and treatments
Released: 19-May-2020 11:10 AM EDT
New analytic tool designed to help guide precision oncology discovery and treatments
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

How can researchers and oncologists glean meaningful information from mounds of data to help guide cancer research and patient care? A new analytic tool developed by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers combines multiple data sets to help sift the signal from the noise.

Newswise: Cervical precancer identified by fluorescence, in a step toward bedside detection
18-May-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Cervical precancer identified by fluorescence, in a step toward bedside detection
Tufts University

Researchers developed a method using fluorescence to detect precancerous metabolic and physical changes in individual epithelial cells lining the cervix. The method, which can detect precancerous lesions non-invasively and non-destructively, opens the door to early-stage bedside diagnostics.

Newswise: Nerve stimulation helps manage pain without opioids
Released: 19-May-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Nerve stimulation helps manage pain without opioids
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) are adapting a minimally invasive, safer approach to electrically treat pain directly at the source as part of the NIH Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative.

Newswise: UIC receives $5.9M to study mood disorders, cognition
Released: 18-May-2020 4:40 PM EDT
UIC receives $5.9M to study mood disorders, cognition
University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received $5.9 million from the National Institute of Mental Health for two studies that will use cognition data to predict relapses in mood disorders.

Newswise: Daniel-Giammar.jpg
Released: 18-May-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
Washington University in St. Louis

Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water. Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found they all affect each other and a closer look is needed.

Released: 18-May-2020 3:25 PM EDT
National institute awards $20 million in renewed funding to forensic science center
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 18, 2020 – The National Institute of Standards and Technology has awarded $20 million in renewed funding to the Center for Statistics and Applications in Forensic Evidence, an interdisciplinary group of more than 60 participants at the University of California, Irvine and five other U.S. institutions of higher education.

Newswise: Study Traces Brain-to-Gut Connections
14-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Study Traces Brain-to-Gut Connections
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Using rabies virus injected into the stomach of rats, researchers trace the nerves back to the brain and find distinct "fight or flight" and "rest and digest" circuits. These results explain how mental states can affect the gut, and present new ways to treat gastrointestinal problems.

Newswise: Grant will help scientists break new ground in gene editing
Released: 18-May-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Grant will help scientists break new ground in gene editing
Iowa State University

A new grant from the National Institutes of Health will allow Iowa State University scientists to continue to develop gene editing technologies to model human disease in zebrafish. The research aims to build new tools to determine which genes have therapeutic potential to treat human genetic diseases that affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems.

Newswise: Scientists identify promising immunotherapy combination for pediatric brain cancer
15-May-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Scientists identify promising immunotherapy combination for pediatric brain cancer
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have discovered that combining immunotherapy with a drug called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) eradicated a deadly type of pediatric brain tumor in mice. The discovery, published in Nature Neuroscience, is expected to lead to a clinical trial to test the benefits of the treatment in patients. The findings also hold implications for other cancers that do not respond to immunotherapy.

Released: 18-May-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Creating a Vaccine against COVID-19
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

David Peabody, PhD, and Bryce Chackerian, PhD, are creating vaccines from particles that are the opposite of Trojan Horses: they look deadly on the outside but are harmless on the inside. Their virus-like particles may rouse the immune system into combatting COVID-19. The idea is to trick the body into believing it’s been infected with a microscopic foe.

Newswise: Roswell Park Team Proposes Strategy for Making Pancreatic Tumors Respond to Checkpoint Inhibition
Released: 18-May-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Roswell Park Team Proposes Strategy for Making Pancreatic Tumors Respond to Checkpoint Inhibition
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A possible new strategy for treating pancreatic cancer highlights the promise of collaboration between experts in both precision medicine and immunology. The findings from a team led by Agnieszka Witkiewicz, MD, and Erik Knudsen, PhD, at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and published today in the journal Gut suggest a combination treatment approach that can make some breakthrough immunotherapy drugs effective for more patients with pancreatic cancer.

Newswise: $10 million gift accelerates research to improve 
cancer therapies, extend benefits to more patients
18-May-2020 6:05 AM EDT
$10 million gift accelerates research to improve cancer therapies, extend benefits to more patients
University of Chicago Medical Center

The David and Etta Jonas Center for Cellular Therapy is being established at the University of Chicago Medicine to accelerate research in hard-to-treat cancers.

Newswise: Global Cooling Event 4,200 Years Ago Spurred Rice’s Evolution, Spread Across Asia
15-May-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Global Cooling Event 4,200 Years Ago Spurred Rice’s Evolution, Spread Across Asia
New York University

A major global cooling event that occurred 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, an international team of researchers has found.

Newswise: Genome-wide pattern found in tumors from brain cancer patients predicts life expectancy
13-May-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Genome-wide pattern found in tumors from brain cancer patients predicts life expectancy
University of Utah Health

For the past 70 years, the best indicator of life expectancy for a patient with glioblastoma — the most common and the most aggressive brain cancer — has simply been age at diagnosis. Now, an international team of scientists has experimentally validated a predictor that is not only more accurate but also more clinically relevant: a pattern of co-occurring changes in DNA abundance levels, or copy numbers, at hundreds of thousands of sites across the whole tumor genome.

Newswise: First detailed analysis of immune response to SARS-CoV-2 bodes well for COVID-19 vaccine development
Released: 14-May-2020 6:05 PM EDT
First detailed analysis of immune response to SARS-CoV-2 bodes well for COVID-19 vaccine development
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A study by researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology documents a robust antiviral immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in a group of 20 adults who had recovered from COVID-19. The findings show that the body’s immune system is able to recognize SARS-CoV-2 in many ways, dispelling fears that the virus may elude ongoing efforts to create an effective vaccine.

Released: 14-May-2020 3:15 PM EDT
BioCompute Object Specification Project Receives Highly Anticipated IEEE Standardization Acceptance
George Washington University

The BioCompute Object Specification Project led by a team at the George Washington University has been officially approved for publication as an internationally recognized standard by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association.

Released: 14-May-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological. Reductive stress causes pathological heart enlargement and diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model.


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