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Embargo will expire: 22-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT

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Released: 15-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Psychologists identify 18 best measures to assess intimate partner violence
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Millions of people experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime and assessment is important in conducting therapy and assisting victims. A team of psychologists at Binghamton University, State University of New York have evaluated dozens of available measures used to assess intimate partner violence and have pinpointed the most effective ones.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Study Suggests Unmedicated, Untreated Brain Illness is Likely in Mass Shooters
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

The first analysis of medical evidence on domestic mass shooters in the U.S. finds that a large majority of perpetrators have psychiatric disorders for which they have received no medication or other treatment, reports a study in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Alarming Rising Trends in Suicide by Firearms in Young Americans
Released: 9-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Alarming Rising Trends in Suicide by Firearms in Young Americans
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers explored suicide trends by firearms in white and black Americans ages 5 to 24 years from 1999 to 2018. From 2008 to 2018, rates of suicide by firearms quadrupled in those ages 5 to 14 years and increased by 50 percent in those ages 15 to 24 years. Suicide deaths by firearms were more prevalent in white than black Americans – a marked contrast with homicide by firearms, which are far more prevalent in black than white Americans.

Newswise: Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
UC Davis Health

A new study shows that two-thirds of Californians don’t know about a law designed to prevent a person at risk of hurting themselves or others from possessing or purchasing firearms or ammunition. More than 80% of survey participants were supportive once they read about this law.

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Released: 20-May-2021 4:50 PM EDT
FSU expert available for comment on COVID-19 Hate Crimes Bill
Florida State University

By: Anna Prentiss | Published: April 23, 2021 | 12:56 pm | SHARE: With a 94-1 vote, the U.S. Senate passed the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act Thursday, a bill that would expedite the Justice Department’s review of hate crimes related to COVID-19 and designate an official at the department to oversee the effort, as well as issue new guidance to state and local law enforcement for online reporting.

Released: 12-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
UNH Research Estimates 1.4 Million Children Have Yearly Violence-Related Medical Visits
University of New Hampshire

A national report from the University of New Hampshire shows close to one and a half million children each year visit a doctor, emergency room or medical facility as a result of an assault, abuse, crime or other form of violence. This is four times higher than previous estimates based only on data from U.S. emergency rooms for violence-related treatment.

Newswise: UA Little Rock Receives Nearly $325,000 NSF Grant to Shine Light on Muslim Hate Crimes in Arkansas
Released: 10-May-2021 10:50 AM EDT
UA Little Rock Receives Nearly $325,000 NSF Grant to Shine Light on Muslim Hate Crimes in Arkansas
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Two criminal justice professors at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock have been awarded a $324,987 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund a three-year program to study anti-Muslim sentiment and Muslim hate crimes in Arkansas. Dr. Tusty ten Bensel, director of the School of Criminal Justice and Criminology, and Dr.

Newswise: 'Breaking the Links' in the Chain of Violence: Journal of Psychiatric Practice Continues Series on Therapeutic Risk Management Approach
Released: 6-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
'Breaking the Links' in the Chain of Violence: Journal of Psychiatric Practice Continues Series on Therapeutic Risk Management Approach
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

With mass shootings and other seemingly meaningless acts of violence in the headlines all too frequently, strategies to assess the risk and reduce the potential for violent acts are sorely needed. The fourth in a series of five columns devoted to therapeutic risk management of violence – focusing on a method called chain analysis to identify and target pathways leading to violent thoughts and behaviors – appears in the May issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: LifeBridge Health’s Center for Hope Launches Red Desk Project As Call-to-Action to Prevent Child Homicide
Released: 5-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
LifeBridge Health’s Center for Hope Launches Red Desk Project As Call-to-Action to Prevent Child Homicide
LifeBridge Health

In a powerful call-to-action to prevent child homicides, LifeBridge Health's Center for Hope created a moving public art display: 111 red school desks on the lawn of Sinai Hospital. Each desk represents a child killed in the City of Baltimore over the past six years. The Red Desk Project is designed to sound the alarm and raise public awareness about the dramatic increase in child homicide in Baltimore City year over year and the effects these homicides have on the entire community, including other children.

Newswise: Poor Grasp of Dating Violence in College Perpetuates ‘Boys Will be Boys’ Views
Released: 4-May-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Poor Grasp of Dating Violence in College Perpetuates ‘Boys Will be Boys’ Views
Florida Atlantic University

A study to understand the dating violence experience and perpetration of college-age women, as well as how they conceptualize violence in dating relationships, reveals normalization of unhealthy violent behaviors where sexual pressure or sexualized verbal harassment are viewed as an innate part of men, supporting the idea that “boys will be boys.” Study participants demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the forms of dating violence and its consequences. They accepted, rationalized and provided excuses for these acts of violence.

Newswise: An Epidemic of Community Violence
Released: 3-May-2021 4:15 PM EDT
An Epidemic of Community Violence
Hackensack Meridian Health

Project HEAL (“Help, Empower, and Lead”), a hospital-based violence intervention program working in coordination with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center, opened its doors this month with the mission to address community, domestic, and gang-related violence in Monmouth County.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Firearms Laws Curb Rates of Gun Violence Across United States
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

States with stricter firearms laws reported lower suicide and homicide rates, according to a Rutgers study.

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Released: 21-Apr-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Five factors that led to Chauvin guilty verdicts
Washington University in St. Louis

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted April 20 on three charges in the death of George Floyd. Collectively, people across the country breathed a sigh of relief because far too often, the story has been police killing people of color with impunity, says an expert on race and the law at Washington University in St.

Newswise: How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Released: 20-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Washington University in St. Louis

Black Americans experience an increase in poor mental health days during weeks when two or more incidents of anti-Black violence occur and when national interest surrounding the events is higher, according to a new study.

Released: 15-Apr-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Epidemic of firearm injury spurs new wave of research
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Now that federal funding is flowing again for research on firearm injury prevention, some of the few already-funded researchers doing work in this area react and look ahead.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Managing the stress of new traumatic events during the pandemic
Keck Medicine of USC

Keck Medicine of USC experts address how traumatic occurrences affect us even more in the age of COVID-19, and how people can cope with anxiety and fear.

Newswise: Resident’s NEJM essay discusses combating anti-Asian hate
Released: 24-Mar-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Resident’s NEJM essay discusses combating anti-Asian hate
University of Washington School of Medicine

Dr. James Lee is a Korean-American resident in psychiatry at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His perspective, “Combating anti-Asian sentiment — a practical guide for clinicians,” was published March 24 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 23-Mar-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Criminologist weighs in on tragedy in Boulder, Colorado
Florida State University

By: Kathleen Haughney | Published: March 23, 2021 | 1:13 pm | SHARE: As the nation grapples with the second mass shooting in a month, criminologists are examining the patterns behind these horrific events.Florida State University Associate Professor of Criminology Jill Turanovic is available to speak to reporters about the deadly shooting in Boulder, Colorado, and the issue of mass shootings.

Released: 22-Mar-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Association of American Cancer Institutes Issues Statement Condemning Racism, Violence
Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI)

In a formal statement, the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) condemned racism, discrimination, and gun violence, urging that these issues be confronted as public health crises.

Released: 19-Mar-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Experts: Anti-Asian racism nuanced and often intertwined in misogyny
Washington University in St. Louis

On March 16, a man went on a shooting rampage at three Atlanta spas, killing eight people, including six Asian women. The killings have sparked outrage and fear in the Asian American community, but the suspect has denied that the killings were racially motivated.The suspect’s claims and subsequent claims made by the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office have set off a debate about anti-Asian racism in America.

Released: 19-Mar-2021 2:00 PM EDT
The Claim That U.S. Has Seen a Surge in Hate Crimes Against Asian People During the COVID-19 Pandemic Is True
Newswise

A study published in March 2021 by California State University, San Bernardino’s Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism found that hate crimes reported to police departments in the 16 largest U.S. cities in 2020 increased by 149%.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Statement by AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine and President Shaun R. Harper on the Shootings in Atlanta and Growing Anti-Asian Violence
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The shooting deaths of eight people, including six women of Asian descent, in Atlanta yesterday is a horrendous tragedy, and just the latest incident in an ever growing wave of mass violence in our country. We extend our deepest sympathy to the loved ones of the victims and to communities in Atlanta and across the United States that have been deeply affected by this senseless assault.

Newswise: UC San Diego Broadens Research on Complicated Escalation of Violence in Mexico
Released: 11-Mar-2021 10:05 PM EST
UC San Diego Broadens Research on Complicated Escalation of Violence in Mexico
University of California San Diego

Looking beyond cartels, the Mexico Violence Resource Project is an initiative from UC San Diego’s Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies launched last fall with the goal of facilitating better analysis on the nuanced drivers of violence in Mexico. The project recently formed a partnership with the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime to support new research and policy advocacy on issues surrounding violence, crime and governance in Mexico.

Released: 18-Feb-2021 12:20 PM EST
The Messenger Matters in Safe Gun Storage, Suicide Prevention Education
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Law enforcement and those in the military, rather than doctors and celebrities, are the most preferred messengers on firearm safety, a Rutgers study found.

Newswise: Handgun Ownership Associated with Firearm Suicide
Released: 11-Feb-2021 10:40 AM EST
Handgun Ownership Associated with Firearm Suicide
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Handgun ownership, not shotgun ownership, is associated with greater odds of a person having died from self-inflicted gunshot wound rather than another suicide method, according to Rutgers researcher

Released: 4-Feb-2021 2:50 PM EST
States with More Gun Laws Have Lower Youth Gun Violence, Rutgers Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Gun violence among children is lower in states with more gun laws, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Released: 28-Jan-2021 3:55 PM EST
Three mental health conditions contribute to violent offenses, WCU study finds
Western Carolina University

Western Carolina University researchers find a disproportionate number of inmates with violent offenses suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder and alcohol use disorder, and published their findings in the Journal of Criminal Psychology.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 2:20 PM EST
Exposure to violence takes a toll on the socioemotional well-being of Californians
UC Davis Health

A survey of Californians finds that exposure to violence has pervasive social and emotional impacts on people, especially when firearms are involved.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 11:30 AM EST
What are the links between violence and mental illness? Update from Harvard Review of Psychiatry
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

When there is news of a violent attack, we sometimes hear that it could be related to mental illness – which may make us ask whether the violence could have been predicted or prevented. Current research and perspectives on associations between violence and mental illness are presented in the special January/February issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.


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