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Newswise: Cultural historian, writer named director of UIC’s Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
Released: 27-Jan-2023 1:05 PM EST
Cultural historian, writer named director of UIC’s Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
University of Illinois Chicago

Liesl Olson is a respected scholar, cultural leader and social justice advocate.

Released: 26-Jan-2023 4:15 PM EST
Tweets reveal where in cities people express different emotions and other behavioral studies in the Behavioral Science channel
Newswise

Below are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

       
Newswise:Video Embedded lost-video-of-georges-lema-tre-father-of-the-big-bang-theory-recovered
VIDEO
Released: 26-Jan-2023 11:10 AM EST
Lost Video of Georges Lemaître, Father of the Big Bang Theory, Recovered
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Fans of science history can now access a new gem: a 20-minute video interview with the father of the Big Bang theory, Georges Lemaître. European broadcast network VRT found the 20-minute recording that is thought to be the only video of Lemaître. His interview, originally aired in 1964 and conducted in French, has now been transcribed and translated into English by physicists at Berkeley Lab and the Vatican Observatory.

Newswise: 52-million-year-old fossils show near-primates were cool with colder climate
Released: 25-Jan-2023 6:40 PM EST
52-million-year-old fossils show near-primates were cool with colder climate
University of Kansas

Two sister species of near-primate, called “primatomorphans,” dating back about 52 million years have been identified by researchers at the University of Kansas as the oldest to have dwelled north of the Arctic Circle.

Newswise: Were galaxies much different in the early universe?
Released: 24-Jan-2023 6:40 PM EST
Were galaxies much different in the early universe?
University of California, Berkeley

An array of 350 radio telescopes in the Karoo desert of South Africa is getting closer to detecting “cosmic dawn” — the era after the Big Bang when stars first ignited and galaxies began to bloom.

Newswise: UAlbany Professor Finds New Poem by Famed Early American Poet Phillis Wheatley
Released: 24-Jan-2023 12:00 PM EST
UAlbany Professor Finds New Poem by Famed Early American Poet Phillis Wheatley
University at Albany, State University of New York

A University at Albany professor has discovered the earliest known full-length elegy by famed poet Phillis Wheatley (Peters), widely regarded as the first Black person, enslaved person and one of the first women in America to publish a book of poetry.

Released: 11-Jan-2023 2:30 PM EST
How UCI saved the ozone layer
University of California, Irvine

On Jan. 9, a United Nations-backed panel of experts announced that Earth’s protective ozone layer is on track to recover within four decades, closing an ozone hole over the Antarctic that was first noticed in the 1980s. But it was research conducted at the University of California, Irvine in the 1970s that made this good new possible.

Newswise: haslum1.jpg_fullwidth.jpg
Released: 6-Jan-2023 11:05 AM EST
Place names are important for understanding history
University of Agder

Preserving place names keeps history alive and helps new generations to understand it, says Vidar Haslum, Associate Professor at the Department of Nordic and Media Studies at the University of Agder.

Newswise: Bering Land Bridge formed surprisingly late during last ice age
Released: 28-Dec-2022 8:20 PM EST
Bering Land Bridge formed surprisingly late during last ice age
Princeton University

A new study shows that the Bering Land Bridge, the strip of land that once connected Asia to Alaska, emerged far later during the last ice age than previously thought.

   
Released: 22-Dec-2022 7:30 PM EST
Hunter-gatherer social ties spread pottery-making far and wide
University of York

Analysis of more than 1,200 vessels from hunter-gatherer sites has shown that pottery-making techniques spread vast distances over a short period of time through social traditions being passed on.

Newswise: Graduate Finishes College Education 50 Years After Starting
Released: 22-Dec-2022 12:50 PM EST
Graduate Finishes College Education 50 Years After Starting
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

A UA Little Rock history student is celebrating the completion of his lifelong dream of finishing his college education, a dream that is 50 years in the making.

Not for public release

This news release is embargoed until 19-Dec-2022 3:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 19-Dec-2022 9:30 AM EST

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Newswise:Video Embedded fsu-historian-available-to-discuss-100-year-anniversary-of-rosewood-massacre
VIDEO
Released: 15-Dec-2022 3:40 PM EST
FSU historian available to discuss 100-year anniversary of Rosewood massacre
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: December 15, 2022 | 2:40 pm | SHARE: A century ago, a mob destroyed the town of Rosewood in Levy County, Florida — racial violence that ended with at least eight people dead and erased what had been a thriving community.A Florida State University historian who helped document the massacre for the Florida Legislature is available to speak to media about her work and the history of Rosewood.

Newswise: SLU Researcher Receives NEH Grant to Create Platform to Share Medieval Interpretations of Culture-Shaping Text
Released: 14-Dec-2022 6:45 PM EST
SLU Researcher Receives NEH Grant to Create Platform to Share Medieval Interpretations of Culture-Shaping Text
Saint Louis University

Atria Larson, Ph.D., associate professor of Medieval Christianity at Saint Louis University, has been awarded a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant through the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Newswise: First digital archive of Brian Friel’s iconic plays launches at Queen’s
Released: 12-Dec-2022 6:05 AM EST
First digital archive of Brian Friel’s iconic plays launches at Queen’s
Queen's University Belfast

Queen’s University Belfast has launched the Brian Friel digital archive, a first of its kind resource, providing access to drafts of the acclaimed Irish playwright’s works, including handwritten notes from some of his most iconic plays.

Newswise: History Center Launches Online Exhibit Featuring Politician Vic Snyder Collection
Released: 8-Dec-2022 12:50 PM EST
History Center Launches Online Exhibit Featuring Politician Vic Snyder Collection
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture (CAHC) has opened a new online exhibit featuring the congressional collection of Vic Snyder, a former Arkansas state senator and member of the U.S. House of Representatives.The collection is quite large and includes more than 680 boxes of items Snyder amassed during his political career, spanning his time in the Arkansas Senate from 1991-1996, as well as his seven terms in the U.

Released: 7-Dec-2022 10:05 AM EST
Fictional civilization leaves behind lasting legacy
Cornell University

Norman Daly spent years chronicling the lost Iron Age civilization of Llhuros – its relics, its rituals, its poetry, its music – as well as the academic commentary it inspired. But the thing that makes Llhuros most noteworthy as a civilization? It never existed.

Released: 5-Dec-2022 4:05 PM EST
We ain't misbehavin' here. The latest news in Behavioral Science on Newswise
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

       
Newswise: Chicago Pile 1: A bold nuclear physics experiment with enduring impact
Released: 1-Dec-2022 5:20 PM EST
Chicago Pile 1: A bold nuclear physics experiment with enduring impact
Argonne National Laboratory

Enrico Fermi’s Chicago Pile 1 experiment in 1942 launched an atomic age, an unrivaled national laboratory system, fleets of submarines, cancer treatments and the unending promise of clean nuclear energy. Argonne National Laboratory builds on its legacy.

Newswise: Findings from 3,000-year-old Uluburun shipwreck reveal complex trade network
28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Findings from 3,000-year-old Uluburun shipwreck reveal complex trade network
Washington University in St. Louis

Using advanced geochemical analyses, a team of scientists, including Michael Frachetti, professor of archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis, have uncovered new answers to decades-old questions about trade of tin throughout Eurasia during the Late Bronze Age.

   
Released: 28-Nov-2022 8:10 PM EST
Media Availability: UNH British Historian to Comment on Royal Visit to Boston
University of New Hampshire

Prince William and Kate Middleton are both expected to make the trip across the pond for the second annual Earthshot Prize ceremony which will be held in Boston. Nicoletta Gullace, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, and an expert on the royal family, is available to talk about the significance of the trip and what this means for the monarchy as well as for the city of Boston.

Newswise: Science ahead of its time: Secret of 157-year old Darwin manuscript
Released: 24-Nov-2022 3:05 AM EST
Science ahead of its time: Secret of 157-year old Darwin manuscript
National University of Singapore

The Darwin Online project at the National University of Singapore (NUS) released an exceptional manuscript handwritten by Charles Darwin in 1865. The manuscript has been placed on auction at Sotheby’s auction house in New York City, making international news. To understand this unique document, historian of science Dr John van Wyhe from the NUS Department of Biological Sciences, and founder and Director of Darwin Online, sheds light on the origins of the 157-year old manuscript, and why Darwin chose to handwrite the selected passage from Origin of Species.

18-Nov-2022 12:40 PM EST
Witchcraft beliefs are widespread, highly variable around the world
PLOS

A newly compiled dataset quantitatively captures witchcraft beliefs in countries around the world, enabling investigation of key factors associated with such beliefs. Boris Gershman of American University in Washington, D.C., presents these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on November 23, 2022.

Released: 11-Nov-2022 6:10 PM EST
Previously unknown monumental temple discovered near the Tempio Grande in Vulci
University of Freiburg

An interdisciplinary team headed by archeologists Dr. Mariachiara Franceschini of the University of Freiburg and Paul P. Pasieka of the University of Mainz has discovered a previously unknown Etruscan temple in the ancient city of Vulci, which lies in the Italian region of Latium.

Newswise: Tracing the origin of Kampo, Japan’s traditional medicine
Released: 11-Nov-2022 5:20 PM EST
Tracing the origin of Kampo, Japan’s traditional medicine
Okayama University

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been around for centuries.

Newswise: Using monsoons of the past to predict climate conditions of the future
Released: 10-Nov-2022 5:55 PM EST
Using monsoons of the past to predict climate conditions of the future
Syracuse University

The North American southwest has been suffering through weather extremes in recent years ranging from searing heatwaves and scorching wildfires to monsoon rainfalls that cause flash floods and mudslides.

Newswise: Researcher uncovers history of American Indian nurses in World War 1
Released: 10-Nov-2022 2:40 PM EST
Researcher uncovers history of American Indian nurses in World War 1
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

One researcher has made it her mission to uncover the history of American Indian women who served as Army nurses during World War I.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 10:05 PM EST
Plagues of the past have a lot to tell us about current crises, according to a new study
Concordia University

As the COVID-19 pandemic settled in over the course of the first half of 2020, few authors enjoyed as much renewed interest as the Algerian-born French existentialist Albert Camus.

Newswise: Veterans’ Voices
Released: 7-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EST
Veterans’ Voices
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

The California State University joins the nation in celebrating Veterans Day on November 11, a day to honor those who have served in our country’s armed forces.

 
Newswise: lee-receiving-medal-with-overlay.jpg
Released: 7-Nov-2022 9:50 AM EST
Daniel Lee: WWII veteran and Medal of Honor recipient
University of Georgia

Daniel Warnell Lee didn’t complain about the severe wounds he suffered in battle during World War II. He also didn’t boast about receiving the nation’s highest military distinction – commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor – for his acts of valor during that battle.

Newswise: Human Expansion 1,000 Years Ago Linked to Madagascar’s Loss of Large Vertebrates
Released: 4-Nov-2022 7:30 PM EDT
Human Expansion 1,000 Years Ago Linked to Madagascar’s Loss of Large Vertebrates
Cell Press

The island of Madagascar—one of the last large land masses colonized by humans—sits about 250 miles (400 kilometers) off the coast of East Africa.

Newswise: A Stone Age Child Buried with Bird Feathers, Plant Fibres and Fur
Released: 2-Nov-2022 1:55 PM EDT
A Stone Age Child Buried with Bird Feathers, Plant Fibres and Fur
University of Helsinki

The exceptional excavation of a Stone Age burial site was carried out in Majoonsuo, situated in the municipality of Outokumpu in Eastern Finland.

Newswise: Ancient DNA Analysis Sheds Light on the Early Peopling of South America
27-Oct-2022 1:00 PM EDT
Ancient DNA Analysis Sheds Light on the Early Peopling of South America
Florida Atlantic University

Using DNA from two ancient humans unearthed in two different archaeological sites in northeast Brazil, researchers have unraveled the deep demographic history of South America at the regional level with some surprising results. Not only do they provide new genetic evidence supporting existing archaeological data of the north-to-south migration toward South America, they also have discovered migrations in the opposite direction along the Atlantic coast – for the first time. Among the key findings, they also have discovered evidence of Neanderthal ancestry within the genomes of ancient individuals from South America. Neanderthals ranged across Eurasia during the Lower and Middle Paleolithic. The Americas were the last continent to be inhabited by humans.

Newswise: Discovering the unknown processes of the evolutionary history of green lizards in the Mediterranean
Released: 28-Oct-2022 5:35 PM EDT
Discovering the unknown processes of the evolutionary history of green lizards in the Mediterranean
University of Barcelona

The evolutionary clade and biodiversity of green lizards of the genera Lacerta and Timon —reptiles common in the Mediterranean basin and surrounding areas of the European continent, North Africa and Asia— have never been studied in detail from the perspective of historical biogeography.

Released: 28-Oct-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Empathy for the Pain of the Conflicting Group Is Altered Across Generations in the Aftermath of a Genocide
Universite Libre de Bruxelles

Feeling empathy for others is deeply engrained into our biology, as seeing another individual in pain triggers an empathic response in the brain of the observer, which allows us to understand and feel what other feels.

Newswise: New Scottish Fossil Sheds Light on the Origins of Lizards
Released: 26-Oct-2022 7:15 PM EDT
New Scottish Fossil Sheds Light on the Origins of Lizards
University of Oxford

A fossil discovery from Scotland has provided new information on the early evolution of lizards, during the time of the dinosaurs.

Newswise:
Released: 26-Oct-2022 3:20 PM EDT
"SMFA at Tufts: Archive and Archaeology" Features Work Exploring Geography, Legacy, Memory
Tufts University

Compelling work from five recent MFA and BFA graduates of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) at Tufts University is the focus of the new exhibition “SMFA at Tufts: Archive and Archaeology,” on view from Nov. 19, 2022 to April 16, 2023 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), in the Edward H. Linde Gallery (Gallery 168).

Newswise: UK’s Oldest Human DNA Obtained, Revealing Two Distinct Palaeolithic Populations
Released: 24-Oct-2022 7:50 PM EDT
UK’s Oldest Human DNA Obtained, Revealing Two Distinct Palaeolithic Populations
University College London

The first genetic data from Palaeolithic human individuals in the UK - the oldest human DNA obtained from the British Isles so far - indicates the presence of two distinct groups that migrated to Britain at the end of the last ice age, finds new research.

Newswise: A 10,000-Year-Old Infant Burial Provides Insights Into the Use of Baby Carriers and Family Heirlooms in Prehistory
Released: 20-Oct-2022 10:40 AM EDT
A 10,000-Year-Old Infant Burial Provides Insights Into the Use of Baby Carriers and Family Heirlooms in Prehistory
University of Colorado Denver

If you’ve taken care of an infant, you know how important it is to find ways to multitask. And, when time is short and your to-do list is long, humans find ways to be resourceful—something caregivers have apparently been doing for a very, very long time.

Newswise: New Book ‘Roadhouse Justice’ Focuses on True Crime
Released: 20-Oct-2022 10:05 AM EDT
New Book ‘Roadhouse Justice’ Focuses on True Crime
Missouri University of Science and Technology

In his latest book, "Roadhouse Justice: Hattie Lee Barnes and the Killing of a White Man in 1950s Mississippi," historian Trent Brown weaves a story of injustice, civil rights and the southern legal system.

Released: 13-Oct-2022 9:00 AM EDT
English Professor’s Book Probes How Cold War Policies Helped Create Post-Colonial Literature
University of Kentucky

A new book by Peter Kalliney, William J. and Nina B. Tuggle chair in English in the University of Kentucky's College of Arts & Sciences, looks at ways in which rival superpowers used cultural diplomacy and the political police to influence writers.

Newswise: “Link” to the Past: Materials Bring to Light Pioneering Latina/o Lesbian and Gay Organization
Released: 11-Oct-2022 1:05 PM EDT
“Link” to the Past: Materials Bring to Light Pioneering Latina/o Lesbian and Gay Organization
American University

In 1987 in Washington, D.C., the Latina/o lesbian and gay organization ENLACE formed and fought discrimination, created a political base for its members, and promoted culture and history. As the earliest known Latina/o lesbian and gay group founded for residents and to address local issues in the city, ENLACE (“link” in English), blazed the trail for organizations that would follow.

Released: 11-Oct-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Academics to chart the historical evolution of the relationship between Conservatism and Unionism
Queen's University Belfast

Queen’s University Belfast and the University of St Andrews have been awarded £492,630 for a project which will chart the historical evolution of the relationship between Conservatism and Unionism throughout the UK.

Released: 4-Oct-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Researcher retrieved archival information that attributes a pseudonymous astronomical treatise to Galileo Galilei
Ca' Foscari University of Venice

A researcher at the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Dr Matteo Cosci, has retrieved archival information which confirms that the treatise Considerazioni Astronomiche di Alimberto Mauri (1606) was in fact written by Galileo Galilei, the illustrious mathematician from Pisa. Galileo used a pseudonym and the author’s uncertain identity had not been confirmed until now. Dr Cosci closely examined original documents preserved at the National Central Library of Florence for the purpose.


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