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Newswise: University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth Event Brings Awareness to Campaign for National Holiday
Released: 11-Jun-2021 3:20 PM EDT
University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth Event Brings Awareness to Campaign for National Holiday
University of Redlands

Why do we need to celebrate Juneteenth and why should we fight to make it a national holiday? Those questions and more will be answered during the University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth event June 15-17, 2021 at redlands.edu/juneteenth. This virtual event is free and open to the public.

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Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Māori connections to Antarctica may go as far back as 7th century, new study shows
Taylor & Francis

Indigenous Māori people may have set eyes on Antarctic waters and perhaps the continent as early as the 7th century, new research published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand shows.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Māori connections to Antarctica may go as far back as 7th century, new study shows
Taylor & Francis

Indigenous Māori people may have set eyes on Antarctic waters and perhaps the continent as early as the 7th century, new research published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand shows.

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Released: 2-Jun-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Forged books of seventeenth-century music discovered in Venetian library
Penn State University

In 1916 and 1917, a musician and book dealer named Giovanni Concina sold three ornately decorated seventeenth-century songbooks to a library in Venice, Italy.

Released: 26-May-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Rutgers Professor Named Cullman Fellow, Awarded NEH Grant for Rep. John Lewis Research
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

David Greenberg started delving into the life of the iconic civil rights leader John Lewis as a way to blend his expertise in the presidency and national politics and tackle the subject of racial equality and justice. The Rutgers-New Brunswick professor launched his book project John Lewis: A Life in Politics, which is to be published by Simon & Schuster, after he traveled to Atlanta in February 2019 for an awe-inspiring meeting to secure the late congressman’s approval.

Released: 25-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Ancient fish bones reveal non-kosher diet of ancient Judeans, say researchers
Taylor & Francis

Ancient Judeans commonly ate non-kosher fish surrounding the time that such food was prohibited in the Bible, suggests a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Tel Aviv.

Released: 25-May-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Study reveals new details on what happened in the first microsecond of Big Bang
University of Copenhagen

About 14 billion years ago, our universe changed from being a lot hotter and denser to expanding radically - a process that scientists have named 'The Big Bang'.

Newswise:Video Embedded israeli-palestinian-conflict-a-primer-on-the-long-standing-dispute-over-gaza
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Israeli-Palestinian conflict: A primer on the long-standing dispute over Gaza
University of Michigan

Since May 10, more than 200 Palestinians and a dozen Israelis have died in fighting in Israel and the occupied territories.

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Released: 18-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
University of Basel

Fields of opium poppies once bloomed where the Zurich Opera House underground garage now stands.

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Released: 11-May-2021 4:05 PM EDT
The Aqueduct of Constantinople: Managing the longest water channel of the ancient world
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Aqueducts are very impressive examples of the art of construction in the Roman Empire. Even today, they still provide us with new insights into aesthetic, practical, and technical aspects of construction and use.

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Released: 7-May-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Scrap for cash before coins
University of Göttingen

How did people living in the Bronze Age manage their finances before money became widespread? Researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Rome have discovered that bronze scrap found in hoards in Europe circulated as a currency.

Newswise: UA Little Rock receives $325,000 grant from National Endowment for the Humanities
Released: 6-May-2021 2:00 PM EDT
UA Little Rock receives $325,000 grant from National Endowment for the Humanities
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock has received a $325,043 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to create a rich collection of digitized material integrated into a map-based website that tracks how urban renewal changed the City of Little Rock in the decades following the Central High School desegregation crisis.

Released: 6-May-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Evidence suggests bubonic plague had long-term effect on human immunity genes
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Scientists examining the remains of 36 bubonic plague victims from a 16th century mass grave in Germany have found the first evidence that evolutionary adaptive processes, driven by the disease, may have conferred immunity on later generations of people from the region.

Released: 6-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Virtual Event Examines Impact and Evolution of the Role of America’s First Ladies
American University

Prominent scholars, archivists, historians, former White House staff members and insiders gather to explore the fascinating lives and evolving roles of America’s First Ladies Symposium. The event is hosted by the White House Historical Association in partnership with American University's First Ladies Initiative.

Newswise: Queen’s historian releases new book on American evangelicals and the radical right
Released: 6-May-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Queen’s historian releases new book on American evangelicals and the radical right
Queen's University Belfast

An historian from Queen’s University Belfast has launched a new book on one of the most controversial political movements in the American Christian Right.

Newswise: Donation from Teddy Roosevelt's great-granddaughter allows NAU to acquire historic Hat Ranch
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:40 PM EDT
Donation from Teddy Roosevelt's great-granddaughter allows NAU to acquire historic Hat Ranch
Northern Arizona University

The ranch in northern Arizona is a transition zone between piñon/juniper and ponderosa pine ecosystems and has a dynamic ecosystem where species are visibly shifting and responding to global environmental change. The donation allows for the land to remain in its natural state, protecting it from grazing and development.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Down the stretch they come: FSU history professor talks about milestone ride for Kentucky Derby jockey
Florida State University

By: Kathleen Haughney | Published: April 29, 2021 | 10:30 am | SHARE: All eyes are on Louisville, Kentucky, this weekend for the annual Run for the Roses. The 147th Kentucky Derby will take place Saturday, May 1, at the famed Churchill Downs with 20 horses competing for the first leg of the Triple Crown.Kendrick Carmouche will be riding the horse Bourbonic.

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Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:05 PM EDT
UCI’s Adria Imada is named a 2021 Andrew Carnegie Fellow
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., April 28, 2021  — The University of California, Irvine’s Adria L. Imada has been named to the 2021 class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows. The professor of history – who also teaches in the medical humanities – joins an exclusive cohort of 26 distinguished scholars from across the nation, selected out of more than 300 nominees.

Newswise: Writing the history of feminism in the South and Appalachia: WVU researcher earns prestigious Carnegie award
Released: 28-Apr-2021 9:15 AM EDT
Writing the history of feminism in the South and Appalachia: WVU researcher earns prestigious Carnegie award
West Virginia University

There’s more to the American women’s movement of the 1960s and 1970s than burning bras and Gloria Steinem. Jessica Wilkerson, associate professor of history at West Virginia University, wants to change that narrative to its truest form: The fight for women’s rights was built on the shoulders of women of color, the working class and women in the south and Appalachia – not just white-collar urbanites.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Climate crises in Mesopotamia prompted the first stable forms of State
Universita di Bologna

During the Bronze Age, Mesopotamia was witness to several climate crises. In the long run, these crises prompted the development of stable forms of State and therefore elicited cooperation between political elites and non-elites.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
We've been at it a long time
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Few sites in the world preserve a continuous archaeological record spanning millions of years. Wonderwerk Cave, located in South Africa's Kalahari Desert, is one of those rare sites.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 10:35 AM EDT
‘Emancipation’s Daughters’ celebrates five iconic Black women
Cornell University

In “Emancipation’s Daughters,” Richardson examines five iconic Black women leaders – Mary McLeod Bethune, Rosa Parks, Condoleezza Rice, Michelle Obama and Beyoncé – who have contested racial stereotypes and constructed new national narratives of Black womanhood in the United States.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 8:55 AM EDT
800-Year-Old Medieval Pottery Fragments Reveal Jewish Dietary Practices
University of Bristol

First evidence of a religious diet locked inside pottery fragments excavated from the early medieval Jewish community of Oxford.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Researchers Announce "Resurrection" Of Skink Species
Carnegie Museum of Natural History

An international team of researchers announces the "resurrection" of the Philippine skink species Brachymeles burksi.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 4:10 PM EDT
New book unveils the hidden role Edith Lewis played in Willa Cather's life and work
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

In "The Only Wonderful Things," to be released April 1 by Oxford University Press, Cather scholar Melissa Homestead details the collaborative partnership and personal relationship between Willa Cather and Edith Lewis. Although the two women lived together openly for nearly 40 years, information about their relationship was suppressed and disputed for many years. Homestead writes: "Willa Cather was no fool, and when she chose to live her life with Edith Lewis, she entered a partnership that enabled her to write some of the most loved and admired novels of the first half of the twentieth century."

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Released: 25-Mar-2021 1:40 PM EDT
Warriors' down bedding could ease journey to realm of the dead
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

The burial field in Valsgärde outside Uppsala in central Sweden contains more than 90 graves from the Iron Age.

Newswise: Distinctively Black names found long before Civil War
Released: 25-Mar-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Distinctively Black names found long before Civil War
Ohio State University

A new study reveals the earliest evidence of distinctively Black first names in the United States, finding them arising in the early 1700s and then becoming increasingly common in the late 1700s and early 1800s.

Released: 23-Mar-2021 9:40 AM EDT
80 years after Virginia Woolf's death, FSU English professor available to comment on Woolf's work, influence
Florida State University

By: Kelsey Klopfenstein | Published: March 22, 2021 | 3:26 pm | SHARE: English writer Adeline Virginia Woolf is considered to be one of the most important modernist 20th-century authors and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. She published more than 45 works, including various novels, essays and short stories.

Released: 18-Mar-2021 11:35 AM EDT
The pandemic isn't history yet - but here's what historians say we should learn from it
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Many people want to put the pandemic behind them, but that’s exactly what we shouldn’t do, say four medical historians from the University of Michigan. That’s what happened after past pandemics and major epidemics, and it set the stage for more disease and death in future years.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EST
Walter LaFeber, revered history professor, dies
Cornell University

Walter F. LaFeber, the Andrew H. and James S. Tisch Distinguished University Professor Emeritus in the Department of History, in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University – who won ovations from students for classroom lectures and whose mastery of U.S. foreign relations guided historians, political scientists and politicians for decades – died March 9 in Ithaca. He was 87.

Released: 10-Mar-2021 11:55 AM EST
Media Availability: UNH British Historian to Comment on Harry and Meghan Interview and Fate of Modern Monarchy
University of New Hampshire

Nicoletta Gullace, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire who studies 20th century and modern British history, is available for comment around Harry and Meghan’s explosive interview and Queen Elizabeth's statement saying the issues raised were “concerning.” She can discuss the underlying historical influences around the royal family’s continued attempts to remain relevant and popular at this difficult time.

Newswise: Giving voice to Black history in the Inland Empire
Released: 3-Mar-2021 3:45 PM EST
Giving voice to Black history in the Inland Empire
University of Redlands

Students in the Black History of the Inland Empire course are interviewing dozens of local Black elders and recording valuable oral histories to better understand the region's evolution.

Newswise: Shining a light on a forgotten figure in science history
Released: 3-Mar-2021 2:20 PM EST
Shining a light on a forgotten figure in science history
Penn State Materials Research Institute

Penn State professor uncovers a 1963 interview with a forgotten, important figure in X-ray diffraction, Walter Friedrich, and translates it with the help of a German professor, making a case that Friedrich deserved to be part of the 1914 Nobel Prize for physics.

Newswise: New book reveals Charles Darwin’s cultural impact in unprecedented detail
Released: 2-Mar-2021 8:45 AM EST
New book reveals Charles Darwin’s cultural impact in unprecedented detail
National University of Singapore

NUS historian of science Dr John van Wyhe has co-published a groundbreaking new book on Charles Darwin which shows for the first time the extent of his cultural impact over the past 160 years. A decade in the making, this volume demonstrates that Darwin is the most influential scientist who has ever lived, having the most species named after him and he is also the most translated scientist in history.

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Released: 1-Mar-2021 1:35 PM EST
Deep dive into bioarchaeological data reveals Mediterranean migration trends over 8,000 years
Florida State University

A team of international researchers led by a Florida State University assistant professor has analyzed reams of data from the Neolithic to Late Roman period looking at migration patterns across the Mediterranean and found that despite evidence of cultural connections, there’s little evidence of massive migration across the region.

Newswise: Rutgers Female Professors Reflect on Past Year of Racial Unrest, Pandemic
Released: 1-Mar-2021 11:45 AM EST
Rutgers Female Professors Reflect on Past Year of Racial Unrest, Pandemic
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

After a year of racial unrest due to the killing of unarmed Black men and women and the upending of our regular lives due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many have forged a new outlook on life. Two Black Rutgers female faculty share their reflections on the past year and their hopes for the future.

Newswise: Three Wellesley Professors Teach Students to View the Pandemic Through a Historical Lens
Released: 26-Feb-2021 7:05 AM EST
Three Wellesley Professors Teach Students to View the Pandemic Through a Historical Lens
Wellesley College

A year into the COVID-19 crisis, it seems like almost everyone can recall the moment they first sensed just how extensively the pandemic making its way around the world would upend their lives.

Newswise: American Institute of Physics to Host Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon, Raise Awareness of Black Physicists
Released: 18-Feb-2021 2:35 PM EST
American Institute of Physics to Host Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon, Raise Awareness of Black Physicists
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

To highlight and enhance the awareness of Black physicists, the American Institute of Physics is partnering with Black in Physics to host a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon to address inaccuracies and incomplete information on the popular resource website about African American and Black scientists. The event will take place during the last week of Black History Month, Feb. 22-26, and bring together volunteers in the physics community to build and edit Wikipedia pages about Black physicists.

Newswise: In Response to Stephen Colbert, FAU Professor Says ‘Spice it Up’
Released: 17-Feb-2021 8:30 AM EST
In Response to Stephen Colbert, FAU Professor Says ‘Spice it Up’
Florida Atlantic University

A research professor gives a “shout out” to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil’s sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers – the worst being the quadratic equation – an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject.

Newswise: How Carnival, Mardi Gras Thrive During a Pandemic
Released: 11-Feb-2021 11:15 AM EST
How Carnival, Mardi Gras Thrive During a Pandemic
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Kim D. Butler, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick scholar of history and Africana studies, reflects on the meaning of the festivals, their relationship to the African diaspora and how they will survive while the world fights COVID-19. The world’s largest Carnival, in Rio de Janeiro, begins Feb. 12. Mardi Gras in New Orleans will be held Feb. 16.

Released: 10-Feb-2021 12:50 PM EST
Most U.S. Schools Teaching Black History, But Few Doing It Well
Johns Hopkins University

As the United States marks Black History Month this year, more K-12 schools in the United States are teaching Black history than ever before. However, ongoing analysis from Johns Hopkins University finds these efforts often fail, because coursework emphasizes the negative aspects of African American life while omitting important contributions made by families of color in literature, politics, theology, art, and medicine.

Newswise: “Fake News” Went Viral After the Death of King James I
Released: 9-Feb-2021 11:05 AM EST
“Fake News” Went Viral After the Death of King James I
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Alastair Bellany, chair of Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s history department, discusses how the death of one early-modern English king spurred a viral conspiracy theory that, through pamphlets and word of mouth, contributed to the execution of the next king – and whether parallels can be drawn to our own age of QAnon-fueled and politically driven lies about everything from vaccines to election integrity.


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