Curated News: JAMA

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Newswise: New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
17-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
Harvard Medical School

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection increased 30 percent for households with a recent birthday in counties with high rates of COVID-19 Findings suggest informal social gatherings such as birthday parties played role in infection spread at the height of the coronavirus pandemic No birthday-bash infection jumps seen in areas with low rates of COVID-19 Households with children’s birthdays had greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection than with adult birthdays

17-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Virtual Reality as Pain Relief: Reducing Dressing Change Pain in Pediatric Burn Patients
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Prior studies have investigated alternative approaches to pain reduction in burn injury patients that focus on distraction, such as music, hypnosis, toys, and virtual reality (VR). In a study published today in JAMA Network Open, Henry Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD, MBA, and his research team reported the use of smartphone-based VR games during dressing changes in pediatric patients with burn injuries.

Released: 18-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Personalized Medicine, Not X-rays, Should Guide Common Forearm Fracture Treatments in Older Adults
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A decade-long study of distal radius fracture in older adults revealed that personalized medicine catering to a patient’s individual needs and environment, not age or X-rays, should guide treatment options. The federally funded study is the most collaborative, intense effort to try and answer a 200-year puzzle about how to treat one of the most common fractures in older adults.

Released: 18-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Teamwork saves lives: COVID-19 hospital network shares key findings to improve care
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Data sharing among 40 Michigan hospitals about the care and outcomes for thousands of inpatients with COVID-19 has led to reduced variation and findings that could inform care anywhere, including approaches for preventing blood clots and reducing overuse of antibiotics, as well as a risk prediction tool.

Newswise: Blood Cancer Patients with COVID-19 Fare Better with Convalescent Plasma
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Blood Cancer Patients with COVID-19 Fare Better with Convalescent Plasma
Washington University in St. Louis

A large, retrospective, multicenter study involving Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients can dramatically improve likelihood of survival among blood cancer patients hospitalized with the virus. The therapy involves transfusing plasma — the pale yellow liquid in blood that is rich in antibodies — from people who have recovered from COVID-19 into patients who have leukemia, lymphoma or other blood cancers and are hospitalized with the viral infection.

Newswise:Video Embedded university-of-miami-miller-school-study-shows-covid-19-mrna-vaccines-do-not-impact-male-fertility
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
University of Miami Miller School Study Shows COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Do Not Impact Male Fertility
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines is safe for male reproduction, according to a new study by University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers published in JAMA , the most widely circulated general medical journal in the world.

15-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Higher COVID-19 Mortality Among Black Patients Linked to Unequal Hospital Quality
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

If Black patients were admitted to the same hospitals that serve a majority of White patients, researchers showed their risk of death would drop by 10 percent

Released: 15-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Drug Rebates for Insurers Tied to Higher Costs for Patients, Especially the Uninsured
University of Washington

The study found that rebates were associated with increases in out-of-pocket costs for patients by an average of $6 for those with commercial insurance, $13 for Medicare patients and $39 for the uninsured.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Teens Experienced Helplessness When Exposed to Secondhand Racism, Activism Might Help
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

According to a qualitative study published in JAMA Network Open adolescents expressed feelings of helplessness when exposed to secondhand racism online. Specifically, adolescents described helplessness stemming from the pervasiveness of racism in our society.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 2:05 AM EDT
Black and White Women Have Same Mutations Linked to Breast Cancer Risk
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The prevalence of genetic mutations associated with breast cancer in Black and white women is the same.

9-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Combination targeted therapy provides durable remission for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A combination of ibrutinib and venetoclax was found to provide lasting disease remission in patients with newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Findings from the single-institution Phase II study were published today in JAMA Oncology and provide the longest follow-up data on patients treated with this drug regimen.

Newswise: Hush little baby don’t say a word… Giving a voice to child victims of family abuse and neglect
8-Jun-2021 11:05 PM EDT
Hush little baby don’t say a word… Giving a voice to child victims of family abuse and neglect
University of South Australia

Children with documented child protection concerns are four times as likely to die before they reach their 16th birthday, according to confronting new research from the University of South Australia.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Nearly 1 in 5 Patients Who Die from Unexplained Sudden Cardiac Death Have Suspicious Gene
University of Maryland Medical Center

.Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and their colleagues found that nearly 20 percent of patients with unexplained sudden cardiac death – most of whom were under age 50 – carried rare genetic variants. These variants likely raised their risk of sudden cardiac death.

Newswise: Research Shows Decrease in Motor Vehicle Collisions and DUI/DWI Convictions Correlates with Increase in Ridesharing Services
Released: 9-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Research Shows Decrease in Motor Vehicle Collisions and DUI/DWI Convictions Correlates with Increase in Ridesharing Services
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The increased use of ridesharing apps was linked to a decrease in motor vehicle collisions and impaired driving convictions in Houston, according to published research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it
UC Davis Health

A new study shows that two-thirds of Californians don’t know about a law designed to prevent a person at risk of hurting themselves or others from possessing or purchasing firearms or ammunition. More than 80% of survey participants were supportive once they read about this law.

Newswise: ADHD Medications Associated with Reduced Risk of Suicidality in Children with Significant Behavioral Symptoms
2-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
ADHD Medications Associated with Reduced Risk of Suicidality in Children with Significant Behavioral Symptoms
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

ADHD medications may lower suicide risk in children with hyperactivity, oppositional defiance and other behavioral disorders, according to new research from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in JAMA Network Open, address a significant knowledge gap in childhood suicide risk and could inform suicide prevention strategies at a time when suicide among children is on the rise.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Researchers Predict COVID Baby Boom
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The COVID-19 shutdown initially seemed to hit pause on pregnancy and birth rates, new research from one major hospital system suggests, but that trend is quickly reversing.

Newswise: COVID-19 Simulation Shows Importance of Continued Safety Efforts During Vaccine Distribution
Released: 1-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
COVID-19 Simulation Shows Importance of Continued Safety Efforts During Vaccine Distribution
University of North Carolina Health Care System

Research published by JAMA Network Open shows how non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) like mask wearing and physical distancing can help prevent spikes in COVID-19 cases as populations continue to get vaccinated.

26-May-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Providing more low-value care doesn’t lead to higher patient experience ratings
University of Chicago Medical Center

Many healthcare providers and policy makers fear that increased pressure to please patients — and ensure high satisfaction ratings as a result — could lead to overuse of low-value care that doesn’t provide any clinical benefit while unnecessarily ratcheting up medical bills. But new research from the University of Chicago and Harvard Medical School may alleviate some of those concerns.

Released: 28-May-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Waking just one hour earlier cuts depression risk by double digits
University of Colorado Boulder

Waking up just one hour earlier could reduce a person's risk of major depression by 23%, suggests a sweeping new genetic study published May 26 in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Released: 27-May-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Study: Cardiac MRI Effective in Detecting Asymptomatic, Symptomatic Myocarditis in Athletes
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A cardiac MRI of athletes who had COVID-19 is seven times more effective in detecting inflammation of the heart than symptom-based testing, according to a study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine with 12 other Big Ten programs.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 27-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

26-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Delaying lung cancer surgery associated with higher risk of recurrence, death
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that postponing lung cancer surgery for more than 12 weeks from the date of diagnosis with a CT scan is associated with a higher risk of recurrence and death.

Newswise: For men, low testosterone means high risk of severe COVID-19
21-May-2021 4:30 PM EDT
For men, low testosterone means high risk of severe COVID-19
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that, among men, low testosterone levels in the blood are linked to more severe COVID-19. The study contradicts widespread assumptions that higher testosterone may explain why men, on average, develop more severe COVID-19 than women do.

Released: 24-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Game on: Game-Based Program Boosts Physical Activity Among Diabetes Patients
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers showed that adding gamification with either competition or support increased physical activity for patients with Type 2 diabetes

21-May-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Babies with Seizures May Be Overmedicated
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Continuing antiseizure treatment after a baby's neonatal seizures stop may not be necessary.

19-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Nearly 3% of Americans take immune-weakening drugs that may limit COVID vaccine response
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A study of more than 3 million insured U.S. adult patients under 65 found that nearly 3% take immunosuppressive drugs that may elevate risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms and hospitalization if they became infected. There is growing evidence that immunosuppressive drugs may also reduce the COVID vaccine's efficacy.

Released: 19-May-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Triple-Drug Therapy Safely Cuts Serious Asthma Flares
McMaster University

Findings are from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Data from 20 randomized controlled trials, which included a total of almost 12,000 patients, were analyzed in the study, providing strong and clear evidence in support of triple-drug therapy.

18-May-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Researchers Show How Mitochondrial Function Influences Schizophrenia Status in Patients with Genetic Disorder
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A multidisciplinary team of researchers showed how the “batteries” of cells are highly implicated in whether patients with the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome develop schizophrenia. The results of the study may eventually lead to targeted prevention and treatment strategies for patients with the condition.

18-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
“45 Is the New 50” as Age for Colorectal Cancer Screening Is Lowered
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Prompted by a recent alarming rise in cases of colorectal cancer in people younger than 50, an independent expert panel has recommended that individuals of average risk for the disease begin screening exams at 45 years of age instead of the traditional 50. “A concerning increase in colorectal cancer incidence among younger individuals (ie, younger than 50 years; defined as young-onset colorectal cancer) has been documented since the mid-1990s, with 11% of colon cancers and 15% of rectal cancers in 2020 occurring among patients younger than 50 years, compared with 5% and 9%, respectively, in 2010,” said Kimmie Ng, MD, MPH, first author of an editorial in JAMA accompanying the article about the guideline change of the USPSTF.

Released: 17-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
More Latinx and Black Children Enrolled in Managed Care Health Plans
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Latinx and Black children are enrolled in public and private managed care health plans in greater proportions than white children, according to data from a national survey published in the journal JAMA Network Open. This pattern persists even when controlled by household income and whether a child has special healthcare needs.

Newswise: Family History, Race and Sex Linked to Higher Rates of Asthma in Children
Released: 17-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Family History, Race and Sex Linked to Higher Rates of Asthma in Children
Henry Ford Health System

A national study on childhood asthma led by Henry Ford Health System has found that family history, race and sex are associated in different ways with higher rates of asthma in children. In a study published in JAMA Pediatrics (hyperlink goes here), researchers found that children with at least one parent with a history of asthma had two to three times higher rates of asthma, mostly through age 4.

Released: 17-May-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Researchers find no increased risk of death with drug-coated devices used for lower extremity revascularization
Beth Israel Lahey Health

Cardiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), designed the Safety Assessment of Femoropopliteal Endovascular Treatment With Paclitaxel-coated Devices (SAFE-PAD) study to provide the information necessary to make scientifically-sound regulatory decisions about the safety of these devices.

Newswise: Routine Testing Before Surgery Remains Common Despite Low Value
17-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Routine Testing Before Surgery Remains Common Despite Low Value
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Before undergoing surgery, patients often go through a number of tests. In fact, about half of patients who had one of three common surgical procedures done in Michigan between 2015 and the midway point of 2019 received at least one routine test beforehand.

13-May-2021 5:45 PM EDT
Cleveland Clinic-Led Trial Shows That High Levels of Prescription Fish Oil Showed No Effect on Cardiac Outcomes
Cleveland Clinic

Evidence from a secondary analysis of Cleveland Clinic’s STRENGTH trial shows that high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid, offered no benefit to patients at high risk for cardiovascular events.

Released: 14-May-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Access to overdose-reversing drugs declined during pandemic, researchers find
Beth Israel Lahey Health

In a new study, clinician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) analyzed naloxone prescription trends during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and compared them to trends in opioid prescriptions and to overall prescriptions.

Newswise: New study finds low levels of a sugar metabolite associates with disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis
Released: 13-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
New study finds low levels of a sugar metabolite associates with disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis
University of California, Irvine

A new University of California, Irvine-led study finds low serum levels of the sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is associated with progressive disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS).

12-May-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Triple-negative breast cancer more deadly for African American women
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that non-Hispanic African American women with triple-negative breast cancer do not fare as well as non-Hispanic white women with this type of breast cancer. The study demonstrates the need for additional research to address disparities in cancer care and understand whether tumor biology or nonbiological reasons such as systemic racism — or a combination of such factors — may be driving these disparities.

Released: 12-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
UNH Research Estimates 1.4 Million Children Have Yearly Violence-Related Medical Visits
University of New Hampshire

A national report from the University of New Hampshire shows close to one and a half million children each year visit a doctor, emergency room or medical facility as a result of an assault, abuse, crime or other form of violence. This is four times higher than previous estimates based only on data from U.S. emergency rooms for violence-related treatment.

Released: 12-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Mutation Profile of Acral Nevi Differs from Acral Melanoma, Moffitt Researchers Say
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new study published in JAMA Dermatology, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on the mutation profile of acral nevi and describe differences between acral nevi and acral melanoma.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 12-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: 8 Out of 10 People Hospitalized With COVID-19 Develop Neurological Problems and They’re More Likely to Die, Global Study Shows
7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
8 Out of 10 People Hospitalized With COVID-19 Develop Neurological Problems and They’re More Likely to Die, Global Study Shows
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A paper published today in JAMA Network Open presents early results of the global effort to gather information about the incidence, severity and outcomes of neurological manifestations of COVID-19 disease.

10-May-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Cholesterol-Lowering Statins Prescribed Less Later in Day
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Statins are prescribed to less than half of eligible U.S. patients, and a new study shows time of day may affect doctors’ likelihood of writing a script

Released: 6-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
UChicago Medicine's emergency department maintains HIV screening despite pandemic interruptions
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new report in JAMA Internal Medicine demonstrates how incorporating blood tests for HIV into standard COVID-19 screening in the emergency department allowed UChicago Medicine to maintain HIV screening volume during the pandemic.

Newswise: New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
Released: 5-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new mutation found in a gene associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation poses a significantly increased risk for heart failure in Black people.

Newswise: Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Released: 5-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers show that although two doses of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — confers some protection for people who have received solid organ transplants, it’s still not enough to enable them to dispense with masks, physical distancing and other safety measures.


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