Curated News: JAMA

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Newswise: Proximity to a Cancer Center Contributes to Cancer Stage at Diagnosis, Study Finds
Released: 22-May-2024 3:00 PM EDT
Proximity to a Cancer Center Contributes to Cancer Stage at Diagnosis, Study Finds
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Location, race and insurance status play a significant part in the odds of a patient being diagnosed with early-stage or late-stage cancer, according to a detailed medical records analysis of more than 94,000 patients with cancer by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Released: 21-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Adding obesity experts to primary care clinics improves patients’ weight loss outcomes
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Giving high-risk patients access to an obesity specialist through their regular primary care clinic increased their chances of receiving at least one evidence-based weight-management treatment, and led to more weight lost in just a year, a new University of Michigan study finds.

15-May-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Rutgers Researchers Identify Impacts of Russia-Ukraine War on Hospitals
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers researchers, aided by international collaborators, have tracked the devastation war has made on Ukraine’s hospital system. Hundreds of hospitals in Ukraine have been forced to close or operate at a reduced capacity since Russia’s invasion of the Eastern European country in February 2022.

Newswise: Link between e-cigarette use and early age of asthma onset in U.S. adults found through UTHealth Houston research
Released: 17-May-2024 10:35 AM EDT
Link between e-cigarette use and early age of asthma onset in U.S. adults found through UTHealth Houston research
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A significant link between the use of electronic cigarettes and earlier age of asthma onset in U.S. adults was reported by UTHealth Houston researchers today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open.

Newswise: End-of-life systemic treatment for patients with advanced cancers does not improve survival
15-May-2024 12:05 PM EDT
End-of-life systemic treatment for patients with advanced cancers does not improve survival
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Patients with very advanced solid tumors saw no significant improvement in overall survival after receiving systemic therapy, according to a study published today in JAMA Oncology by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Yale Cancer Center.

Released: 15-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Blood Pressure Drugs More Than Double Bone-Fracture Risk in Nursing Home Patients
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers Health research finds a link between common medications and life-threatening injuries

Newswise: The doctor is in…. but what’s behind them?
14-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
The doctor is in…. but what’s behind them?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Americans have gotten used to seeing their doctors and other health care providers using telehealth video visits. But a new study reveals that what a doctor has behind them during a telehealth visit can make a difference in how the patient feels about them and their care. The more professional, the better.

Released: 14-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
New Research: 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Lost to Suicide Had Recent Jail Experience
Michigan State University

A newly published study found that one in five U.S. adults who die by suicide spent at least one night in jail in the year prior to their death. Rapidly and efficiently providing prevention, screening and outreach resources for this group is critical to reducing adult suicides nationwide.

13-May-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Study Reveals Mixed Public Opinion on Polygenic Embryo Screening for IVF
Harvard Medical School

Survey reveals nearly three-quarters of U.S. adults support using emerging technology to screen embryos during IVF for risk of developing certain health conditions or traits that arise from more than one gene. Only about one-third of respondents approved of using the technology to predict traits unrelated to disease. Nearly all expressed concerns about potential negative outcomes for individuals or society. Findings underscore need for public education about benefits, limitations, ethical hazards of polygenic risk scores for embryos.

Newswise:Video Embedded anti-immigrant-political-rhetoric-and-action-threaten-latinoa-youth
VIDEO
Released: 13-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Anti-Immigrant Political Rhetoric and Action Threaten Latino/a Youth
George Washington University

Harsh political rhetoric about immigrants and anti-immigrant actions can damage parent-child relationships in Latino families and in turn lead to a significant increase in mental health problems for the kids in those families, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics.

Released: 9-May-2024 7:05 AM EDT
Youth Experiencing Parental Death Due to Drug Poisoning and Firearm Violence in the US, 1999-2020
Newswise

The US is experiencing dual overlapping public health crises of drug poisoning (herein, drugs) and firearm deaths. Since 1999, more than 1 million residents of the US have died by fatal drug poisonings and more than 750 000 by firearms.

Released: 6-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
New Physicians’ Exam Scores Tied to Patient Survival
Harvard Medical School

How well a newly minted doctor scores on their medical board exam appears linked to patients’ odds of dying or being readmitted to the hospital. Findings offer reassurance that certification exams, which aim to demonstrate the competence of physicians, capture critical knowledge and clinical judgment skills for physicians.

Newswise: ER patient portal usage increasing, study shows
Released: 6-May-2024 11:05 AM EDT
ER patient portal usage increasing, study shows
UT Southwestern Medical Center

More people are using online patient portals to view their information while in the emergency room, but access is challenging for members of medically underserved communities and the elderly, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers and national colleagues found in a new study.

1-May-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Women Need Better Treatments for Bacterial Vaginosis
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) affects about one-quarter of reproductive-age women and is linked to adverse health outcomes, such as increased HIV risk. Yet for decades, BV treatment in the United States has largely relied on antibiotics, and BV recurrence is common following antibiotic therapy.

Released: 30-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
New breast cancer screening recommendations aim to address health inequities, especially among Black women
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Challenges remain in ensuring equitable access to screening and addressing gaps in evidence regarding supplemental screening modalities and the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, notes Joann Elmore, MD, MPH, a professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA in a newly published editorial in JAMA.

Newswise: Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in US Federally Qualified Health Centers
Released: 29-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in US Federally Qualified Health Centers
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

A national study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center found major gaps in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening use in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in the US, relative to overall screening rates in the country.

Newswise: Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in U.S. Federally Qualified Health Centers
26-Apr-2024 4:00 PM EDT
Cancer screening rates are significantly lower in U.S. Federally Qualified Health Centers
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

A national study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center found major gaps in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening use in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in the U.S., relative to overall screening rates in the country.

26-Apr-2024 9:05 AM EDT
The Aspirin Conundrum: Navigating Negative Results, Age, Aging Dynamics and Equity
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University

A new study examining the role of aspirin in breast cancer treatment reveals critical issues related to health equity and aging that have broad implications for cancer and other disease intervention trials, say researchers from Georgetown University’s Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Newswise: Homelessness a Major Issue for Many Patients in the Emergency Department
26-Apr-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Homelessness a Major Issue for Many Patients in the Emergency Department
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Housing insecurity is an issue for 1 in 20 patients who go to emergency departments at major medical centers in the Southeast, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published in JAMA Network Open.

25-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Undocumented Latinx patients got COVID-19 vaccine at same rate as U.S. citizens
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For undocumented Latinx patients who sought care in the emergency room during the pandemic, the reported rate of having received the COVID-19 vaccine was found to be the same as U.S. citizens, a new UCLA Health study found.

Newswise: Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Led to Some, But Not Many, Developmental Milestone Delays in Infants and Young Children
18-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Led to Some, But Not Many, Developmental Milestone Delays in Infants and Young Children
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Infants and children 5 years old and younger experienced only “modest” delays in developmental milestones due to the COVID-19 pandemic disruptions and restrictions, a study led by Johns Hopkins Children’s Center finds.

16-Apr-2024 3:00 PM EDT
New urine-based test detects high-grade prostate cancer, helping men avoid unnecessary biopsies
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have developed a new urine-based test that addresses a major problem in prostate cancer: how to separate the slow-growing form of the disease unlikely to cause harm from more aggressive cancer that needs immediate treatment.

Released: 15-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
From Opioid Overdose to Treatment Initiation: Outcomes Associated with Peer Support in Emergency Departments
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers Health researchers publish largest study on outcomes associated with hospital-based peer support programs after opioid overdose

Newswise: Study Reveals AI Enhances Physician-Patient Communication
Released: 15-Apr-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Study Reveals AI Enhances Physician-Patient Communication
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine study shows that AI enhances physician-patient communication.

Released: 12-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Young-Onset Dementia Tied to New Risk Factors
Alzheimer's Center at Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine

“Are the risk factors for early onset Alzheimer’s the same as late onset?” asks Domenico Praticò, MD, the Scott Richards North Star Foundation Chair for Alzheimer’s Research, Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and Microbiology, and Director of the Alzheimer’s Center at Temple (ACT), at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM)

8-Apr-2024 3:05 PM EDT
‘Deaths of despair’ among Black Americans surpassed those of white Americans in 2022
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new analysis by researchers at UCLA Health found that mortality rates of middle-aged Black Americans caused by the “deaths of despair” -- suicide, drug overdose and alcoholic liver disease – surpassed the rate of white Americans in 2022.

Newswise: Living Near Green Space Associated With Fewer Emotional Problems in Preschool-Age Kids, NIH Study Finds
Released: 9-Apr-2024 12:30 PM EDT
Living Near Green Space Associated With Fewer Emotional Problems in Preschool-Age Kids, NIH Study Finds
Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes NIH

Children who live in areas with natural spaces (e.g., forests, parks, backyards) from birth may experience fewer emotional issues between the ages of 2 and 5, according to a study funded by the NIH Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program.

   
Newswise: Nurses Cite Employer Failures as their Top Reason for Leaving
8-Apr-2024 12:00 PM EDT
Nurses Cite Employer Failures as their Top Reason for Leaving
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) – published in JAMA Network Open today – showed that, aside from retirements, poor working conditions are the leading reasons nurses leave healthcare employment.

Released: 8-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Novo estudo descobre que tumores de câncer de mama triplo-negativos com um aumento nas células imunes tiveram menor risco de recorrência após cirurgia, mesmo quando não houve tratamento com quimioterapia
Mayo Clinic

Um novo estudo multicentro e internacional sugere que as pessoas portadoras de câncer de mama triplo-negativo em estágio precoce, com níveis elevados de células imunes dentro desses tumores, podem ter um baixo nível de recorrência e melhores taxas de sobrevivência, mesmo quando não houve tratamento com quimioterapia.

Released: 8-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Un nuevo estudio determina que los tumores de cáncer de mama triple negativo con un aumento de células inmunitarias presentan un menor riesgo de recurrencia después de la cirugía, incluso cuando no se tratan con quimioterapia
Mayo Clinic

Un nuevo estudio multicéntrico e internacional indica que las personas que tienen cáncer de mama triple negativo (TNBC) en etapa inicial y niveles elevados de células inmunitarias en sus tumores pueden tener un menor riesgo de recurrencia y mejores tasas de supervivencia, incluso cuando no se tratan con quimioterapia.

4-Apr-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Youths with Mood Disorders 30 Percent Less Likely to Acquire Driver’s License Than Peers
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers found that teens and young adults with mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder, were 30% less likely to obtain their driver’s license than peers without such disorders. Additionally, those youths with mood disorders experienced a slightly elevated risk of crashing.

4-Apr-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Radiation before mastectomy cuts time delays for reconstructive surgery in breast cancer patients
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that altering the sequence of breast cancer treatment to administer radiation before mastectomy allowed for concurrent breast reconstruction surgery, which reduced the number of operations required, minimized treatment delays and improved patient satisfaction.

2-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Nerve stimulation for sleep apnea is less effective for people with higher BMIs
Washington University in St. Louis

A sleep apnea treatment known as hypoglossal nerve stimulation is less effective in people with higher body mass indexes (BMIs), according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

2-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Feeding the lonely brain
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Study finds that lonely women experienced increased activation in regions of the brain associated with food cravings.

Newswise: Double Trouble: The Risks of Mixing Alcohol and Sports Wagering
Released: 2-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Double Trouble: The Risks of Mixing Alcohol and Sports Wagering
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV study finds binge drinking is disproportionately more common among sports bettors than non-gamblers or those who don't wager on sports.

28-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
New study finds triple-negative breast cancer tumors with an increase in immune cells have lower risk of recurrence after surgery
Mayo Clinic

A new multicenter, international study suggests that people who have early-stage triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and high levels of immune cells within their tumors may have a lower risk of recurrence and better survival rates even when not treated with chemotherapy.

1-Apr-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Chatbot outperformed physicians in clinical reasoning in head-to-head study
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

ChatGPT-4, an artificial intelligence program designed to understand and generate human-like text, outperformed internal medicine residents and attending physicians at two academic medical centers at processing medical data and demonstrating clinical reasoning. In a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine, physician-scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) compared a large language model’s (LLM) reasoning abilities directly against human performance using standards developed to assess physicians.

27-Mar-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Study provides a first look at oncologists' views on ethical implications of AI in cancer care
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In a survey of more than 200 U.S. oncologists, vast majority indicate that oncologists should be able to explain how AI works to their patients. Respondents say AI developers, more than oncologists or hospitals, have responsibility for legal issues arising from AI use in cancer care.

Newswise: Higher Genetic Risk of Obesity Means Working Out Harder for Same Results
26-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Higher Genetic Risk of Obesity Means Working Out Harder for Same Results
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Persons with a higher genetic risk of obesity need to work out harder than those of moderate or low genetic risk to avoid becoming obese, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) paper published in JAMA Network Open.

Newswise: Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Released: 26-Mar-2024 7:55 AM EDT
Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Indiana University

Black patients in need of a heart transplant may be less likely to receive one than white patients, according to a new study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers.

Released: 25-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Human brains are getting larger. That may be good news for dementia risk
UC Davis Health

A new study published in JAMA Neurology found human brains are getting bigger. The increased size may lead to a brain reserve, potentially reducing the risk of dementia.

20-Mar-2024 6:05 PM EDT
Most new doctors face some form of sexual harassment, even after #MeToo
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

More than half of all new doctors face some form of sexual harassment in their first year on the job, including nearly three-quarters of all new female doctors and a third of males, a new study finds.

Newswise: Inflammation-Reducing Drug Shows No Benefit for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Nih Trial
Released: 21-Mar-2024 11:30 AM EDT
Inflammation-Reducing Drug Shows No Benefit for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Nih Trial
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

The drug minocycline, an antibiotic that also decreases inflammation, failed to slow vision loss or expansion of geographic atrophy in people with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a phase II clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Dr. Nima Sharifi Pens JAMA Commentary on Prostate Cancer Variant His Team Identified
Released: 21-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Dr. Nima Sharifi Pens JAMA Commentary on Prostate Cancer Variant His Team Identified
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Desai Sethi Urology Institute (DSUI) Scientific Director Nima Sharifi, M.D., authored an invited commentary in JAMA Network Open related to a new Million Veteran Program study on the HSD3B1 genotype, an allele he helped discover more than 10 years ago.

Released: 20-Mar-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Experts warn climate change will fuel spread of infectious diseases
UC Davis Health

Infectious diseases specialists call the medical field to be ready to deal with the impact of climate change on spreading diseases, such as malaria, Valley fever, E-coli and Lyme disease.

20-Mar-2024 7:05 AM EDT
In Sickness and in Health, Older Couples Mostly Make Medicare Moves Together
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Older Americans who enroll in Medicare, or change their coverage, do so as individuals, even if they’re married or live with a partner. But a new study suggests the need for more efforts to help both members of a couple weigh and choose their options together.

19-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Researchers Report on the Effectiveness of Skin Biopsy to Detect Parkinson’s and Related Neurodegenerative Diseases
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) showed that a simple skin biopsy test detects an abnormal form of alpha-synuclein, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and the subgroup of neurodegenerative disorders known as synucleinopathies, at high positivity rates.



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