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Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT

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Released: 6-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
UChicago Medicine's emergency department maintains HIV screening despite pandemic interruptions
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new report in JAMA Internal Medicine demonstrates how incorporating blood tests for HIV into standard COVID-19 screening in the emergency department allowed UChicago Medicine to maintain HIV screening volume during the pandemic.

Newswise: New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
Released: 5-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new mutation found in a gene associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation poses a significantly increased risk for heart failure in Black people.

Newswise: Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Released: 5-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Organ Transplant Recipients Remain Vulnerable to Covid-19 Even After Second Vaccine Dose
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers show that although two doses of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — confers some protection for people who have received solid organ transplants, it’s still not enough to enable them to dispense with masks, physical distancing and other safety measures.

Newswise: International Study Links Brain Thinning to Psychosis
Released: 5-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
International Study Links Brain Thinning to Psychosis
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Subtle differences in the shape of the brain that are present in adolescence are associated with the development of psychosis, according to an international team led by psychiatrists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

Released: 5-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
A Calculator that Predicts Risk of Lung Cancer Underperforms in Diverse Populations
Thomas Jefferson University

Research finds that a commonly used risk-prediction model for lung cancer does not accurately identify high-risk Black patients who could benefit from early screening.

Newswise: Large Study Analyzes Two Different Classes of ADHD Drugs in Preschool-Age Children
3-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Large Study Analyzes Two Different Classes of ADHD Drugs in Preschool-Age Children
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a multi-institutional study, researchers in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network (DBPNet), led by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), have conducted the first and largest analysis to date comparing the effectiveness and side effects of stimulants like methylphenidate (Ritalin) and alpha-adrenergic agonists like guanfacine (Tenex) in preschool-age children. The researchers found that both classes of drugs have benefits, with differing side effects, suggesting that decisions on which class of drugs to prescribe should be made based on individual patient factors. The retrospective study was published today in JAMA.

Newswise:Video Embedded massive-negative-impact-of-covid-19-on-cancer-screenings-quantified-in-ku-medical-center-faculty-study-published-in-jama-oncology
VIDEO
Released: 30-Apr-2021 10:55 AM EDT
Massive negative impact of COVID-19 on cancer screenings quantified in KU Medical Center faculty study published in JAMA Oncology
University of Kansas Cancer Center

Nearly 10 million cancer screenings in the U.S. failed to happen because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study published in JAMA Oncology, a publication of the American Medical Association.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Primary Care Providers Over-Treat Patients Based on Overestimation of Medical Conditions
University of Maryland Medical Center

Primary care practitioners often over-estimate the likelihood of a patient having a medical condition based on reported symptoms and laboratory test results. Such overestimations can lead to over-diagnosis and overtreatment, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

28-Apr-2021 3:35 PM EDT
COVID-19 Stress and Remote Schools Worsened Youth Mental Health
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A survey of over 32,000 caregivers of youth in Chicago Public Schools found that around a quarter of children and adolescents were described as stressed, anxious, angry or agitated after pandemic-related school closures and the switch to remote learning. Around a third of youth were described by caregivers as lonely and only one-third were described as having positive social and peer relationships. Across the board, caregivers reported significantly worse psychological well-being after school closures as compared to before. Findings were published in the journal JAMA Network Open.

Newswise:Video Embedded tanning-beds-and-skin-cancer-heeding-the-call-to-action
VIDEO
Released: 28-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Tanning Beds and Skin Cancer: Heeding the Call to Action
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Public health officials and researchers have become increasingly concerned about the health risks posed by indoor tanning. Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently addressed the importance of increasing efforts to limit indoor tanning among minors in a viewpoint paper published in the April 28 2021 online edition of JAMA Dermatology.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise:Video Embedded few-young-adult-men-have-gotten-the-hpv-vaccine
VIDEO
27-Apr-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Few young adult men have gotten the HPV vaccine
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Just 16% of men 18 to 21 years old have received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine at any age. Yet oropharyngeal cancer, which occurs in the throat, tonsils, and back of the tongue, is now the leading cancer caused by HPV — and 80% of those diagnosed with it are men.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Researchers find COVID-19 mother-to-newborn infection rates are low, but indirect risks exist
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Study reveals that, while mother-to-newborn transmission of the virus is rare, newborns of expectant mothers with COVID-19 can suffer indirect adverse health risks as a result of worsening maternal COVID-19 illness.

23-Apr-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University Find COVID-19 Variants May Offer Clues in Predicting Patient Outcomes as Virus Evolves
Cleveland Clinic

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, mutations of SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – have spread to the U.S. and a host of other countries worldwide. Recent studies suggest that current COVID-19 variants are up to 70% more contagious than the pandemic’s original strains. A multidisciplinary team of scientists at Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University used genomic sequencing to track SARS-CoV-2 as it mutated in Northeast Ohio from March 11 to April 22, 2020.

22-Apr-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Preeclampsia During Pregnancy Increases Stroke Risk Later in Life
University of Utah Health

Women who have preeclampsia during pregnancy are at least three times more likely to have strokes later in life than women who do not have a history of this condition, according to University of Utah Health scientists.

Newswise: Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
Released: 22-Apr-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
University of Washington School of Medicine

In a worldwide study of 2,100 pregnant women, those who contracted COVID-19 during pregnancy were 20 times more likely to die than those who did not contract the virus.

Released: 21-Apr-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Research Results: Double Masking During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Environmental Protection Agency - Center for Environmental Solutions and Emergency Response (CESER)

EPA, along with their co-authors at UNC, recently published an article titled “Fitted Filtration Efficiency of Double Masking During the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

21-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Study finds stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe for treating patients with multiple metastases
University of Chicago Medical Center

In a phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of the approach, UChicago Medicine researchers found that high-powered, tightly-targeted radiation therapy is safe for treating patients with multiple metastases.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Two Blood Thinners at Once: More Risk with the Same Reward
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

For some patients, adding aspirin to a direct oral anticoagulant is an equation that rarely adds up.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 19-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu
Released: 15-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Elderly patients of female physicians are more likely than those of male physicians in the same outpatient practice to be vaccinated against the flu. This trend holds for all racial and ethnic groups studied and could provide insight into improving vaccination rates for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses

Newswise: 262150_web.jpg
Released: 15-Apr-2021 3:20 PM EDT
COVID-19 reduces access to opioid dependency treatment for new patients
Princeton University

COVID-19 has been associated with increases in opioid overdose deaths, which may be in part because the pandemic limited access to buprenorphine, a treatment used for opioid dependency, according to a new study led by Princeton University researchers.

Newswise: Treatment not always needed to prevent vision loss in patients with elevated eye pressure
14-Apr-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Treatment not always needed to prevent vision loss in patients with elevated eye pressure
Washington University in St. Louis

The national Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study was designed to determine whether lowering elevated eye pressure in patients might prevent vision loss from glaucoma. Researchers recently completed follow-up studies on patients 20 years after the start of the original study and found that not all patients with elevated eye pressure need pressure-lowering treatment to prevent vision loss from glaucoma.

14-Apr-2021 12:05 AM EDT
Immunotherapy Alone Extended Life for Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients with KRAS Mutation
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Real-word evidence is suggesting, for the first time, the most beneficial treatment courses that could help extend the lives of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

Newswise: When Immigrant Policies are Decriminalized, Babies are Born Healthier
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:30 AM EDT
When Immigrant Policies are Decriminalized, Babies are Born Healthier
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health led-research finds that criminalizing immigrant policies were associated with higher rates of preterm birth for Black women born outside the U.S.

Newswise: Lifetime Monitoring Following Infant Cardiac Surgery May Reduce Future Hypertension Risk
Released: 13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Lifetime Monitoring Following Infant Cardiac Surgery May Reduce Future Hypertension Risk
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a medical records study covering thousands of children, a U.S.-Canadian team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concludes that while surgery to correct congenital heart disease (CHD) within 10 years after birth may restore young hearts to healthy function, it also may be associated with an increased risk of hypertension — high blood pressure — within a few months or years after surgery.

12-Apr-2021 4:45 PM EDT
When Does a Bruise on an Infant or Young Child Signal Abuse?
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Bruising caused by physical abuse is the most common injury to be overlooked or misdiagnosed as non-abusive before an abuse-related fatality or near-fatality in a young child.

Newswise:Video Embedded suicide-among-female-nurses-is-double-that-of-the-general-female-population
VIDEO
12-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Suicide Among Female Nurses Is Double That of the General Female Population
University of Michigan

Female nurses are roughly twice as likely to commit suicide than the general female population and 70% more likely than female physicians, according to a University of Michigan study examining suicide among physicians and nurses.

Newswise: Study Finds Americans Eat Food of Mostly Poor Nutritional Quality – Except at School
12-Apr-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Americans Eat Food of Mostly Poor Nutritional Quality – Except at School
Tufts University

A study of U.S. dietary trends over 16 years finds food consumed from typical sources, such as restaurants, grocery stores, schools, and work, is mostly of poor nutritional quality, with the exception of food from schools. Disparities in dietary quality by race, ethnicity, and income persist.

Released: 6-Apr-2021 8:40 AM EDT
Covid-19 Pandemic Results in 40,000 Children Losing a Parent
Stony Brook University

A letter published in JAMA Pediatrics, co-authored by Rachel Kidman, PhD, of the Program in Public Health at Stony Brook University, presents a statistical model showing that around 40,000 children (est. between 37,000 and 43,000) had lost a parent due to the Covid-19 pandemic by February 2021.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Cardiac Care During Pandemic Reveals Digital Shifts
Cedars-Sinai

New research from the Smidt Heart Institute shows that more patients—specifically those with medical risk factors or from underserved communities—opted into telehealth appointments for their cardiovascular care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

31-Mar-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Health and Academic Professionals With Dependents at Greatest Risk of Quitting After COVID-19
University of Utah Health

Up to one in five employees at an academic medical institution are considering leaving their professions due to the strains of coping with the pandemic in their own lives, according to a new University of Utah Health study.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Time to Shift from “Food Security” to “Nutrition Security” to Increase Health & Well-Being
Tufts University

A new Viewpoint article argues that today’s health and equity challenges call for the U.S. to shift from “food insecurity” to “nutrition insecurity” in order to catalyze appropriate focus and policies on access not just to food but to healthy, nourishing food.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Study Identifies Risk Factors for COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Mortality Among U.S. Nursing Home Residents
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Risks of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection for long-stay nursing home residents were mainly dependent on factors in their nursing homes and surrounding communities.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Blacks, Latinos and Native Americans Severely Underrepresented in Health Workforce, New Study Says
George Washington University

In 2019, Blacks, Latinos and Native Americans were severely underrepresented in the health care workforce, a trend that shows limited signs of improvement, according to a study published today by George Washington University researchers.

30-Mar-2021 8:30 PM EDT
Exercise in mid-life won’t improve cognitive function in women
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For middle-aged women, exercise has many health benefits, but it may not help maintain cognitive function over the long term, according to a new UCLA Health study.

Newswise: Preventive treatment reduces diabetic retinopathy complications
26-Mar-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Preventive treatment reduces diabetic retinopathy complications
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Early treatment with anti-VEGF injections slowed diabetic retinopathy in a clinical study from the DRCR Retina Network (DRCR.net). However, two years into the four-year study its effect on vision was similar to standard treatment, which usually begins at the onset of late disease.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Cincinnati Children’s Develops Model to Help Identify Risk Factors for Reading Difficulties in Children before Kindergarten
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have developed a new framework for different factors influencing how a child’s brain is “wired” to learn to read before kindergarten.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Drug Coupons and Vouchers Cover Only a Sliver of Prescription Drugs
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Use of vouchers and coupons offered by pharmaceutical companies to defray patients’ out-of-pocket drug costs is concentrated among a small number of drugs.

26-Mar-2021 12:00 AM EDT
WIC Child Nutrition Program Saw a Boost in Enrollment After Shift From Paper Vouchers to Electronic Benefit Cards, According to Penn Medicine Study
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The U.S. government’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, usually abbreviated as WIC, saw a jump in enrollment of nearly 8 percent in states that implemented a federally mandated switch from paper vouchers to electronic benefit cards (EBTs), according to a study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The finding, published in JAMA Pediatrics, supports the rationale for the switch, which was to increase participation by making it easier and less stigmatizing to obtain and redeem WIC benefits.

Released: 25-Mar-2021 5:45 PM EDT
Catching more breast cancers when mammograms are limited
UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

In one of the largest research projects of its kind, a new study published in JAMA Network Open looks at nearly 900,000 individuals and close to 2 million mammograms to come up with a new way to detect the most breast cancer cases with the fewest exams.

23-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Text Message Program Shows 60 Percent of Opioid Tablets Unused After Common Procedures
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A Penn Medicine new study of how text messaging could inform opioid prescribing practices showed that 60 percent of opioids are left over after orthopaedic and urologic procedures

Newswise: Study Finds High Prevalence of Smoking Among Surgery Patients
Released: 23-Mar-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Study Finds High Prevalence of Smoking Among Surgery Patients
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Almost a quarter of Michigan residents undergoing common surgical procedures also smoke.

Released: 23-Mar-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Telehealth Consults Increased More Than 50-Fold Among Privately Insured Working-Age Patients During First Phase of the Pandemic
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A study co-authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that telehealth consults among privately insured working-age patients accounted for almost 24 percent of outpatient consults with health care providers during the early phase of the pandemic.

Released: 22-Mar-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Black and Latinx Children Less Likely to Get Diagnostic Imaging During Emergency Visits to Children’s Hospitals
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

The first large study of more than 13 million visits to 44 pediatric Emergency Departments (ED) found that Black and Latinx children were less likely to receive x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI compared with white children. These findings, published in JAMA Network Open, were consistent across most diagnostic groups and persisted when stratified by public or private insurance type.

Released: 22-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Study finds racial equity in crisis standard of care guidelines
Boston University School of Medicine

There are two simultaneously occurring pandemics in the U.S.: Racism and COVID-19.


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