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Newswise: Potential New Therapy for Crohn’s, Colitis Identified
4-Mar-2019 3:55 PM EST
Potential New Therapy for Crohn’s, Colitis Identified
Washington University in St. Louis

researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a compound that may treat IBD without directly targeting inflammation. The compound tamps down the activity of a gene linked to blood clotting. They discovered that the gene was turned on at sites of intestinal inflammation and damage, and blocking its activity reduces IBD symptoms in mice.

Released: 5-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EST
SLU Awarded $580,000 Grant To Develop Missouri’s First Academic Health Department
Saint Louis University Medical Center

Saint Louis University’s Pamela Xaverius, Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology, and Darcy Scharff, Ph.D., associate professor of behavioral science and health education, have received a $580,000 grant from Missouri Foundation for Health (MFH) to develop the required infrastructure for a successful Academic Health Department (AHD).

Newswise: Physics researchers discover new approach to control the spread of light
4-Mar-2019 10:00 AM EST
Physics researchers discover new approach to control the spread of light
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Physics researchers have discovered a new way to control light — one that produces a concentrated, optically energetic laser beam when transmitted through diffuse media such as fog, biological tissue or white paint — rather than the typical weaker light with a lateral spread.

Released: 28-Feb-2019 4:50 PM EST
Stock Analysts Accentuate the Negative So Firms Can Achieve More Positives, Study Finds
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study, involving two Washington University in St. Louis faculty at Olin Business School, finds that analysts disseminate earnings news by revising share-price targets or stating they expect firms to beat earnings estimates, often tempering such information — even suppressing positive news — to facilitate beatable projections. The paper is scheduled for the March issue of The Accounting Review.

Newswise: Study first to show processes determining fate of new RNA pesticides in soils
Released: 28-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Study first to show processes determining fate of new RNA pesticides in soils
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis develop a method to learn more about how a new type of pesticide degrades in the environment.

Newswise: A New Method for Precision Drug Delivery: Painting
Released: 27-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
A New Method for Precision Drug Delivery: Painting
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are one step closer to delivering precise amounts of medication to exact location, repurposing an existing imaging "painting" method.

Newswise: Missouri S&T joins LIGO Scientific Collaboration and world-class astrophysics research
Released: 26-Feb-2019 7:05 PM EST
Missouri S&T joins LIGO Scientific Collaboration and world-class astrophysics research
Missouri University of Science and Technology

This spring semester, Missouri University of Science and Technology became the state’s only institution to join the worldwide LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) Scientific Collaboration (LSC) of researchers committed to detecting cosmic gravitational waves. This research explores the fundamental physics of gravity using the emerging field of gravitational wave science as a tool for astronomical discovery.

Released: 26-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused together. In this configuration, the cell is able to more efficiently use oxygen for energy.

Newswise: High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones
Released: 25-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones
Washington University in St. Louis

A team of engineers in the McKelvey School of Engineering has developed a high-powered fuel cell that operates at double the voltage of today’s commercial fuel cells. It could power underwater vehicles, drones and eventually electric aircraft at a significantly lower cost.

Newswise: Fight Colorectal Cancer breaks down barriers to colorectal cancer screening
Released: 25-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
Fight Colorectal Cancer breaks down barriers to colorectal cancer screening
Fight Colorectal Cancer

During March 2019 - Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month - the leading advocacy organization is rallying advocates to raise awareness so all Americans can access life-saving colorectal cancer screenings.

Released: 22-Feb-2019 9:40 AM EST
Chemical added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment
Washington University in St. Louis

Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. However, new research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that a chemical that is supposed to kill bacteria is actually making them stronger and more capable of surviving antibiotic treatment.

19-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
Unnecessary testing for UTIs cut by nearly half
Washington University in St. Louis

Over-testing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, which spreads antibiotic resistance. Infectious disease specialists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis made changes to hospital procedures that cut urine tests by nearly half without compromising doctors’ abilities to detect UTIs.

Released: 21-Feb-2019 7:05 AM EST
Earning a bee’s wings
Washington University in St. Louis

When a honey bee turns 21 days old, she leaves the nest to look for pollen and nectar. For her, this is a moment of great risk, and great reward. It’s also the moment at which she becomes recognizable to other bees.

Newswise: Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks
Released: 20-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks
Washington University in St. Louis

Long before Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and even MySpace, early Mississippian Mound cultures in America’s southern Appalachian Mountains shared artistic trends and technologies across regional networks that functioned in similar ways as modern social media, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: For adult scoliosis, surgery, other treatments are viable options
Released: 20-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST
For adult scoliosis, surgery, other treatments are viable options
Washington University in St. Louis

A multi-center study of adults with lumbar scoliosis has determined that the most important factor in deciding whether to operate is the extent of a patient's disability due to his or her spinal deformity, as well as how much that disability interferes with day-to-day life.

Newswise: When a Defect Might Be Beneficial
Released: 19-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
When a Defect Might Be Beneficial
Washington University in St. Louis

In the quest to design more efficient solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a team of engineers has analyzed different types of defects in the semiconductor material that enables such devices to determine if and how they affect performance.

Newswise: Unmet Social Needs Among Medicaid Members Lead to Stress, Chronic Conditions
Released: 13-Feb-2019 4:30 PM EST
Unmet Social Needs Among Medicaid Members Lead to Stress, Chronic Conditions
Washington University in St. Louis

A survey of Medicaid members found that increasing levels of unmet social needs were positively associated with stress, smoking and chronic conditions, according to new research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.Scientists, led by Tess Thompson, research assistant professor, analyzed data from 1,214 online surveys from Medicaid members about social needs, demographics, and health-related and psychosocial outcomes.

Released: 13-Feb-2019 7:30 AM EST
High Pressure Freezing Technique Paired with Electron Microscopy and Tomography Reveals Previously Unknown Mycorrhizal Compartment
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

The importance of the mycorrhizal symbiosis to plant growth has led to a large body of research into their formation and function, yet there are critical unanswered questions. Howard Berg, director of the Imaging and Microscopy Facility at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and his collaborators have discovered a previously unknown compartment within these symbiotic cortical root cells that could be important for nutrient exchange and molecular communication between the symbiotic partners.

Released: 11-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Olin Study: The Unintended Consequences of Tinkering with Online Prices
Washington University in St. Louis

Retailers didn't realize offering different prices to consumers actually could backfire — until researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, UCLA and Alibaba had the data to show it. Using data from 100 million Alibaba customers who shopped at 11,000 retailers over 1 month in 2016, the researchers looked at consumers who left products — carrying special price promotions — untouched in their online shopping carts for more than 24 hours. The results were surprising.

Newswise: New Research Characterizes the Evolution of Genetic Pathway for Reproductive Fitness in Flowering Plants
Released: 11-Feb-2019 8:00 AM EST
New Research Characterizes the Evolution of Genetic Pathway for Reproductive Fitness in Flowering Plants
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Two groups of sRNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers. One of these pathways for sRNA production, previously believed present in grasses and related monocots, has now been demonstrated to be present widely in the flowering plants, evolved over 200 million years ago, and is arguably one of the evolutionary innovations that made them so successful.

Newswise: Understanding tropical rainfall, both past and present
Released: 11-Feb-2019 6:05 AM EST
Understanding tropical rainfall, both past and present
Washington University in St. Louis

A drop of rainwater that falls on a cassava field in Uganda takes a different path than one that falls 500 miles east in Somalia. Knowing where rain comes from now, and where it might come from under future climate scenarios, is important for the millions of people who rely on subsistence agriculture to survive. Research from Washington University in St Louis offers a new tool for tracking the rainwater race.

Newswise: Trump's Legacy Still Uncertain, Suggest Experts on Nation's Collective Memory
Released: 7-Feb-2019 5:05 PM EST
Trump's Legacy Still Uncertain, Suggest Experts on Nation's Collective Memory
Washington University in St. Louis

While Trump’s legacy may indeed hinge on his ability to overcome partisan differences, ongoing research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that most U.S. presidents are destined to fade quickly from the nation’s collective memory.

Newswise:Video Embedded prehistoric-food-globalization-spanned-three-millennia
VIDEO
Released: 5-Feb-2019 5:05 PM EST
Prehistoric Food Globalization Spanned Three Millennia
Washington University in St. Louis

Prehistoric peasant farmers struggling to put more food on the table fueled the global spread of some of the world’s first and most important domesticated grain crops beginning as early as 7,000 years ago, according to an international study led by anthropologists at Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: Less anesthesia during surgery doesn’t prevent post-op delirium
1-Feb-2019 1:00 PM EST
Less anesthesia during surgery doesn’t prevent post-op delirium
Washington University in St. Louis

One in four older adults experiences delirium after surgery. In an attempt to change that, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis closely monitoring brain activity during surgery and minimized anesthesia dosage if needed. But it had no significant effect on the occurrence of delirium.

Newswise: Women’s Brains Appear Three Years Younger Than Men’s
31-Jan-2019 1:05 PM EST
Women’s Brains Appear Three Years Younger Than Men’s
Washington University in St. Louis

Women's brains appear to be three years younger than men's of the same age, according to a study of brain metabolism by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could explain why women maintain their cognitive skills longer than men.

Released: 4-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Drug target identified for chemotherapy-resistant ovarian, breast cancer
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may have found a path toward improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy in people with breast or ovarian cancer caused by defects in one of the BRCA genes. The researchers identified a pair of genes that operate in parallel to BRCA and may increase susceptibility to chemotherapy drugs.

Released: 1-Feb-2019 5:05 PM EST
New Clues Discovered to Lung Transplant Rejection
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered clues to a particularly deadly form of rejection that can follow lung transplantation. Called antibody-mediated rejection, the condition remains impervious to available treatments and difficult to diagnose. The researchers have identified, in mice, a process that may prevent the condition and lead to possible therapies to treat it.

Newswise: WashU Expert: Mosquitoes and ticks do better in extreme cold than we do
Released: 30-Jan-2019 2:05 PM EST
WashU Expert: Mosquitoes and ticks do better in extreme cold than we do
Washington University in St. Louis

With paper-weight wings and spindly legs, the mosquito hardly seems built to handle the cold. The secret to its survival is eggs built to withstand freezing temperatures. Even if some eggs die off during extreme cold, mosquito populations rebound quickly. The same holds true for ticks that can wait out a cold snap far below a forest’s layer of leaves.

Released: 28-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
Early Parent-Child Conflicts Predict Trouble Charting Life Path
Washington University in St. Louis

Children who have more conflict in relationships with their mothers during early years of elementary school may find it more difficult to find a sense of purpose in life as they reach adulthood, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 28-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
Cassava High In Iron and Zinc Could Improve Diets and Health In West Africa
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

A new study led by Danforth Center principal investigator Nigel Taylor and research scientist Narayanan Narayanan, shows that field-grown cassava plants overexpressing a combination of plant genes can accumulate significantly higher concentrations of iron and zinc.

Released: 25-Jan-2019 5:05 PM EST
Missouri S&T poised to help address state’s bridge repair needs
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson’s plan to release bond funds to support bridge repair across the state comes as welcome news to researchers at Missouri S&T, home to a federal initiative to develop new robotic tools to inspect and preserve bridges and other infrastructure.Missouri S&T researchers are in the midst of a five-year effort to develop new technologies to inspect and maintain bridges and portions of highway.

22-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
Sleep deprivation accelerates Alzheimer’s brain damage
Washington University in St. Louis

A study in mice and people from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that sleep deprivation causes tau levels to rise and tau tangles to spread through the brain. Tau tangles are associated with Alzheimer's disease and brain damage.

Released: 24-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST
TechAccel and Danforth Center Launch New Company to Control Insects
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and TechAccel are launching RNAissance Ag LLC, a new company that holds the exclusive license to RNA-interference technology developed at the Danforth Center. The new company will use the proprietary technology in the development of sprayable insect control measures.

18-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST
Rising Temperatures May Safeguard Crop Nutrition as Climate Changes
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Hotter temperatures may offset the negative effects of higher carbon dioxide levels on seed quality, according to a two-year soybean field study.

17-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST
Blood test detects Alzheimer’s damage before symptoms
Washington University in St. Louis

A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer’s disease – even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

Newswise: Using Bacteria to Create a Water Filter That Kills Bacteria
Released: 18-Jan-2019 1:05 PM EST
Using Bacteria to Create a Water Filter That Kills Bacteria
Washington University in St. Louis

Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose. It's highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly — and could provide clean water for those in need.

Newswise: Purple Reigns
Released: 18-Jan-2019 7:05 AM EST
Purple Reigns
Washington University in St. Louis

Purple rice is a whole grain with high levels of antioxidants -- and high levels of genetic diversity, thanks to traditional farming practices, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: Can Drinking Oolong Tea Help Prevent Breast Cancer?
Released: 17-Jan-2019 1:05 PM EST
Can Drinking Oolong Tea Help Prevent Breast Cancer?
Saint Louis University Medical Center

SLU scientists and their colleagues have found that oolong tea can damage breast cancer cells and inhibit the growth and progression of tumors in the lab, potentially offering a non-toxic strategy to prevent breast cancer.

Newswise: Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice
Released: 17-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a gene therapy that blocks axonal degeneration, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions.

Newswise: New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes
16-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST
New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more responsive to fluctuating glucose levels in the blood.

Newswise: MXene researchers find 2-D transition-metal carbides react with water, opening a door to their unknown chemistry
Released: 16-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
MXene researchers find 2-D transition-metal carbides react with water, opening a door to their unknown chemistry
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have discovered that two-dimensional (2-D) titanium carbide materials, or MXenes, can react with water with no other oxidizers involved. Their finding may lead to new insights into the unusual chemistry of MXenes and consequently, have impacts on MXenes’ storage and device manufacturing.

Newswise: Novel Imaging Technology May Help Reduce Biopsies for Breast Tumors
Released: 16-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
Novel Imaging Technology May Help Reduce Biopsies for Breast Tumors
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis plan to use a new imaging technique to get a better look at breast tumors and reduce unnecessary biopsies.

Newswise: Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system
Released: 15-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research has identified a backup for an important biological system – the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body’s blood supply.

Newswise: Menstrual Hygiene Needs Unmet for Low-Income Women
Released: 10-Jan-2019 5:05 PM EST
Menstrual Hygiene Needs Unmet for Low-Income Women
Saint Louis University Medical Center

In one of the first needs assessments of its kind, Anne Sebert Kuhlmann, Ph.D., MPH, associate professor of behavioral science and health education at Saint Louis University’s College for Public Health and Social Justice and her team have documented the challenges, from affordability to transportation, that low-income people with periods face in accessing basic sanitary supplies.

Released: 10-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
Saint Louis University, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency Sign Agreement to Partner on Geospatial Research Projects
Saint Louis University Medical Center

Saint Louis University has established a new relationship with the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) that will allow the organizations to collaborate on geospatial research, training, and innovation initiatives.

Released: 9-Jan-2019 5:05 PM EST
New strategy may curtail spread of antibiotic resistance
Washington University in St. Louis

In studying a bacterium that causes disease in hospitalized people, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have figured out a key step in the transmission of antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another. Their insight suggests a new strategy for stopping the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Released: 9-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST
How Fast Fashion Hurts Environment, Workers, Society
Washington University in St. Louis

The overabundance of fast fashion — readily available, inexpensively made clothing — has created an environmental and social justice crisis, claims a new paper from an expert on environmental health at Washington University in St. Louis.“From the growth of water-intensive cotton, to the release of untreated dyes into local water sources, to worker’s low wages and poor working conditions, the environmental and social costs involved in textile manufacturing are widespread,” said Christine Ekenga, assistant professor at the Brown School and co-author of the paper “The Global Environmental Injustice of Fast Fashion,” published in the journal Environmental Health.

6-Jan-2019 7:00 PM EST
Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer’s disease
Washington University in St. Louis

Poor sleep is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and now researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis think they know why. They found that older people who have less slow-wave sleep – the deep sleep you need to consolidate memories and wake up feeling refreshed – have higher levels of the brain protein tau. Elevated tau is a sign of Alzheimer’s disease and has been linked to brain damage and cognitive decline.

Released: 8-Jan-2019 7:05 PM EST
Mice sleeping fitfully provide clues to insomnia
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis – working with mice with sleep problems similar to those experienced by people with the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) – believe the animals will help shed light on insomnia linked to NF1 or other factors.


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