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Newswise: Cincinnati Children’s and University of Cincinnati Name New Chair of Pediatrics, Chief Medical Officer, Research Foundation Director
Released: 28-May-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Cincinnati Children’s and University of Cincinnati Name New Chair of Pediatrics, Chief Medical Officer, Research Foundation Director
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Tina L. Cheng, MD, MPH, will be the new chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the new chief medical officer at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and director of the Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation.

19-May-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Researchers: As Ohio Abortion Regulations Increased, Disparities in Care Emerged
Ohio State University

Ohio has seen a growing disparity between abortion rates in rural and urban communities, later abortions, and less use of medication abortion care as the state has heavily regulated abortion and clinics have closed, a new study has found.

Newswise: Record $34.5 million gift from Rainbow Foundation supports patient care
Released: 19-Nov-2019 1:50 PM EST
Record $34.5 million gift from Rainbow Foundation supports patient care
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Announcement of the Rainbow Foundation making a generous gift of $34.5 million – the largest gift in University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s and the foundation's histories – to help ensure all children throughout Northeast Ohio have continued access to highest quality health care.

Released: 23-May-2019 6:00 AM EDT
Nationwide Foundation Pediatric Innovation Fund Makes Sixth Annual Gift for Significant Impact at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
Nationwide Children's Hospital

The Nationwide Foundation established the Pediatric Innovation Fund in 2014 and has so far contributed $60 million to it, including the gift announced today.

1-Mar-2019 3:35 PM EST
Researchers Uncover New Facets of HIV’s ‘Arms Race’ with Human Defense System
Ohio State University

A new study reveals details about the evolutionary contest between HIV and the human immune system that could one day improve treatment. Research led by Shan-Lu Liu of The Ohio State University demonstrates the important role of one protein in allowing HIV to flourish within human cells despite the immune system’s efforts to beat it back.

Newswise: Study: Job applications without criminal history questions help increase hiring of former prisoners
Released: 4-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EST
Study: Job applications without criminal history questions help increase hiring of former prisoners
Case Western Reserve University

Former prisoners have a better chance of getting hired if a job application doesn’t include questions about criminal history, according to new employment research from Case Western Reserve University.

Newswise: New Findings Shed Light on Origin of Upright Walking in Human Ancestors
Released: 28-Feb-2019 10:10 AM EST
New Findings Shed Light on Origin of Upright Walking in Human Ancestors
Case Western Reserve University

The oldest distinguishing feature between humans and our ape cousins is our ability to walk on two legs – a trait known as bipedalism. Among mammals, only humans and our ancestors perform this atypical balancing act. New research led by a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine professor of anatomy provides evidence for greater reliance on terrestrial bipedalism by a human ancestor than previously suggested in the ancient fossil record.

Newswise: Actor, Children’s-Literacy and AIDS-Research Advocate LeVar Burton Named 2019 Inamori Ethics Prize-Winner
27-Feb-2019 4:45 PM EST
Actor, Children’s-Literacy and AIDS-Research Advocate LeVar Burton Named 2019 Inamori Ethics Prize-Winner
Case Western Reserve University

LeVar Burton, a celebrated American actor, director, producer and writer for more than 40 years, is adding another accolade—this one for his tireless, decades-long dedication to children’s literacy and AIDS research and treatment.

Newswise: Newly Identified Drug Targets Could Open Door for Esophageal Cancer Therapeutics
Released: 27-Feb-2019 4:55 PM EST
Newly Identified Drug Targets Could Open Door for Esophageal Cancer Therapeutics
Case Western Reserve University

Blocking two molecular pathways that send signals inside cancer cells could stave off esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), the most common esophageal malignancy in the United States, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Newswise: Health Insurance is not Assurance of Healthcare
Released: 27-Feb-2019 11:15 AM EST
Health Insurance is not Assurance of Healthcare
Case Western Reserve University

Because of high out-of-pocket expenses, Ohioans who purchase subsidized health-exchange insurance often can't afford the care they need when they need it. That is a central finding of a new study from researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Released: 26-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Cancer Survivors See Mostly Positives in How They Have Changed
Ohio State University

Two years after diagnosis, breast cancer survivors have four times more positive than negative thoughts about changes they experienced because of their illness, a new study found.

Released: 26-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Testing tools to ease stress of parents caring for kids aided by medical technology at home
Case Western Reserve University

Children who depend on medical technology—feeding tubes, oxygen, or mechanical ventilators and other devices to stay alive--represent about 20 percent of all children discharged from hospitals nationally. But they account for about 60 percent of all health-care spending, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing researcher Val Toly said.

Released: 26-Feb-2019 10:00 AM EST
University Hospitals named one of the 2019 World’s Most Ethical Companies® by Ethisphere for seventh time
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Announcement of University Hospitals being named one of 2019 World’s Most Ethical Companies® by Ethisphere.

Released: 25-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
A Disconnect Between Migrants’ Stories and Their Health
Ohio State University

While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. In a small study in Columbus, researchers found that many migrants celebrated living in Columbus. However, they also experienced discrimination and exhibited physical signs of stress, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar and obesity.

Released: 25-Feb-2019 12:55 PM EST
New NASA Mission Could Find More Than 1,000 Planets
Ohio State University

A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth’s solar system, new research suggests. The new telescope paves the way for a more accurate, more focused search for extraterrestrial life, according to researchers. The study, by a team of astronomers at The Ohio State University, provides the most detailed estimates to date of the potential reach of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope mission (nicknamed WFIRST.) It was designed by NASA and astronomers throughout the country to find new planets and research dark energy, the mysterious force that pervades otherwise empty space and that could hold the keys to understanding how the universe expands. Their work was published Feb. 25 in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series.

Released: 21-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Handwriting: The foodie font of love
Ohio State University

For restaurants, though, conveying a sense of love could be as simple as picking a different menu font. A recent study found that when restaurant diners read menus with healthy food options printed in a typeface that appears handwritten, they were more likely to believe that the food was prepared with more care than similar items printed in machine-style fonts.

Newswise: New “Interspecies Communication” Strategy between Gut Bacteria and Mammalian Hosts Uncovered
Released: 21-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
New “Interspecies Communication” Strategy between Gut Bacteria and Mammalian Hosts Uncovered
Case Western Reserve University

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. A study published today in Cell describes a form of “interspecies communication” in which bacteria secrete a specific molecule—nitric oxide—that allows them to communicate with and control their hosts’ DNA, and suggests that the conversation between the two may broadly influence human health.

19-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
New Study Finds Dramatic Increase in Calls to U.S. Poison Control Centers for Kratom Exposure
Nationwide Children's Hospital

A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that there were more than 1,800 calls to U.S. Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to kratom from January 2011 through December 2017.

Released: 20-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
Women with a strong social support network may be at lower risk for heart disease
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Having good friends can save your life, as a study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) demonstrates how strong social support may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in postmenopausal women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Released: 20-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost
Ohio State University

Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests.

Newswise: Preventing “Cell Wall Remodeling” May Hold Key to Defeating Intransigent Super Bugs in Cystic Fibrosis, Other Diseases
Released: 18-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Preventing “Cell Wall Remodeling” May Hold Key to Defeating Intransigent Super Bugs in Cystic Fibrosis, Other Diseases
Case Western Reserve University

With a $3.34M grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is conducting research that could help physicians better understand how bacteria such as B. multivorans resist antibiotics, potentially leading to improved treatments.

Newswise: Scientists Reveal How 3D Arrangement of DNA Helps Perpetuate the Species
14-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Scientists Reveal How 3D Arrangement of DNA Helps Perpetuate the Species
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn’t clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future generations.

Newswise: Men’s Porn Habits Could Fuel Partners’ Eating Disorders, Study Suggests
Released: 14-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Men’s Porn Habits Could Fuel Partners’ Eating Disorders, Study Suggests
Ohio State University

A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner’s porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
Discovering a new form of communication in the brain
Case Western Reserve University

'Ephaptic Coupling' only sounds like a Valentines' Day science story. Actually, it's the description of a 4th and newly discovered form of communication in the brain.

Newswise:Video Embedded close-to-half-a-million-e-valentines-sent-to-patients-at-cincinnati-children-s
VIDEO
Released: 14-Feb-2019 10:30 AM EST
Close to Half a Million E-Valentines Sent to Patients at Cincinnati Children’s
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Record number makes Valentine’s Day a little sweeter for patients and families

Newswise: Case Western Reserve Researcher Awarded $1.3 Million to Develop Decision-Making Tool for Treating Intimate Partner Violence
Released: 13-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Case Western Reserve Researcher Awarded $1.3 Million to Develop Decision-Making Tool for Treating Intimate Partner Violence
Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine’s Gunnur Karakurt, PhD has been awarded a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to identify effective treatments for intimate partner violence (IPV), and to develop a decision-making tool for care providers. The project involves analyzing national data to identify subgroups of people who respond similarly to specific IPV treatments. By combining findings with a meta-analysis of the literature and computer modeling, clinicians will be better able to choose between evidence-based treatments.

Newswise: Nationwide Children’s Hospital Appoints Tim Robinson as CEO
12-Feb-2019 10:00 AM EST
Nationwide Children’s Hospital Appoints Tim Robinson as CEO
Nationwide Children's Hospital

The Board of Directors of Nationwide Children’s Hospital has announced Tim Robinson, the organization’s current executive vice president and chief financial and administrative officer, as the new chief executive officer of Nationwide Children's, effective July 1, 2019.

Newswise:Video Embedded ohio-state-first-to-identify-hearing-and-deaf-infants-process-information-differently
VIDEO
Released: 11-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
Ohio State First To Identify Hearing And Deaf Infants Process Information Differently
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Differences in cognitive development between hearing and deaf children start in infancy, according to new research by The Ohio State University College of Medicine published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

Released: 8-Feb-2019 5:05 PM EST
First Ohio State University Woman Inducted Into National Academy of Engineers
Ohio State University

An Ohio State University engineering professor has become the first woman from the university to be named to the National Academy of Engineering.

Newswise: Blood Cells Could Hold Master Clock Behind Aging
Released: 7-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Blood Cells Could Hold Master Clock Behind Aging
Case Western Reserve University

Blood cells could hold the key to aging, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. In a study published in Aging Cell, researchers found human blood cells have an intrinsic clock that remains steady even after transplant. The researchers say the clock could control human aging and may underlie blood cancers.

Newswise: Rattlesnake venom: mild, medium and wicked hot
4-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Rattlesnake venom: mild, medium and wicked hot
Ohio State University

In a surprising evolutionary twist, a new study suggests that while one rattlesnake may routinely feast on lizard meat, its seemingly identical neighbor snake might strike and strike and never kill its would-be reptilian prey. The first-of-its-kind research reveals significant venom variation within populations of Florida pygmy rattlesnakes, showing that effectiveness against one type of prey differs widely among individuals and opening up questions about why this variation exists.

Released: 4-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves
Ohio State University

“Fungicides, often needed for crop protection, are routinely used during almond bloom, but in many cases growers were also adding insecticides to the mix. Our research shows that some combinations are deadly to the bees, and the simplest thing is to just take the insecticide out of the equation during almond bloom."

30-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
Time parents spend with children key to academic success
Ohio State University

The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce.

Released: 31-Jan-2019 4:40 PM EST
The “Stuff” of the Universe Keeps Changing
Ohio State University

The composition of the universe—the elements that are the building blocks for every bit of matter—is ever-changing and ever-evolving, thanks to the lives and deaths of stars.Jennifer Johnson, a professor of astronomy at The Ohio State University and the article’s author.

29-Jan-2019 7:05 AM EST
Americans Concerned About Their Weight, but Don’t Understand Link to Heart Conditions and Overall Health
Cleveland Clinic

A Cleveland Clinic survey finds that while most Americans (88 percent) understand that there is a connection between a healthy heart and a healthy weight, most aren’t doing enough – or anything – to combat their own weight issues. The survey found 74 percent are concerned about their weight and 65 percent are worried about getting heart disease due to extra pounds, yet less than half (43 percent) of Americans have tried to make dietary changes to lose weight and 40 percent of those who describe themselves as overweight or obese say they aren’t careful about which foods they eat.

Newswise: Researchers Develop New Approach for Vanquishing Superbugs
Released: 30-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST
Researchers Develop New Approach for Vanquishing Superbugs
Case Western Reserve University

A scientific team from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic has developed a new way to identify second-line antibiotics that may be effective in killing germs already resistant to a first-line antibiotic – potentially helping overcome antibiotic resistance. This new research provides an approach clinicians could consult when deciding which antibiotic treatment courses will be most effective for patients.

Newswise: Minoff Family makes visionary gift to University Hospitals
Released: 29-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
Minoff Family makes visionary gift to University Hospitals
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

The Minoff Family of Northeast Ohio has made a generous gift to the University Hospitals system. In their honor, UH will rename one of its health centers to the Minoff Health Center at Chagrin Highlands.

Released: 28-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
Study: Climate change reshaping how heat moves around globe
Ohio State University

The Earth’s atmosphere and oceans play important roles in moving heat from one part of the world to another, and new research is illuminating how those patterns are changing in the face of climate change.

Newswise: Eleven Health Screening Tests Every Woman Should Have
Released: 28-Jan-2019 10:05 AM EST
Eleven Health Screening Tests Every Woman Should Have
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

A list of screening tests for women recommended by family medicine specialist Lili Ann Lustig, DO, of University Hospitals.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-wage-fight-against-aging-bone-marrow-stem-cell-niche-study-suggests-restoring-body-s-blood-factory-to-boost-immunity-fend-off-cancers-cincinnati-as-people-get-older-so-do-the-hematopoietic-stem-cells-hscs-that-form-their-blood-creating-an-incre
VIDEO
Released: 28-Jan-2019 9:05 AM EST
NIAID-Sponsored Clinical Trial of Ebola Vaccines Begins at Cincinnati Children's
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

A Phase 1 clinical trial of investigational vaccines intended to protect against Zaire ebolavirus (Ebola) has begun in the United States at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The study is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

Released: 24-Jan-2019 11:35 AM EST
Your personality could put you at greater risk for developing diabetes
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (January 23, 2019)--It has been said that a good personality can help one succeed in life. But can it also guard against disease risk? A new study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows that positive personality traits, such as optimism, actually may help to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Released: 24-Jan-2019 11:35 AM EST
Your personality could put you at greater risk for developing diabetes
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (January 23, 2019)--It has been said that a good personality can help one succeed in life. But can it also guard against disease risk? A new study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows that positive personality traits, such as optimism, actually may help to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Newswise: New Skin Test Detects Prion Infection Before Symptoms Appear
Released: 22-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
New Skin Test Detects Prion Infection Before Symptoms Appear
Case Western Reserve University

Prions can infect both humans and animals, causing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, mad cow disease in cattle, and chronic wasting disease in elk and deer. The infectious, misfolded protein particles often go undetected as they destroy brain tissue, causing memory loss, mobility issues, and ultimately death. Preclinical detection of prions has proven difficult, but new research suggests skin samples hold early signs of prion disease that precede neurologic symptoms.

14-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
Greenland Ice Melting Four Times Faster Than in 2003, Study Finds
Ohio State University

Greenland is melting faster than scientists previously thought—and will likely lead to faster sea level rise—thanks to the continued, accelerating warming of the Earth’s atmosphere, a new study has found.

Released: 19-Jan-2019 2:05 PM EST
BGSU online criminal justice master's program one of the best in nation
Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green State University's online criminal justice master's program is ranked 14th in the country in the 2019 U.S. News & World Report Best Online Programs rankings, which were released Jan. 15.

Newswise: UH Ventures program spotlights tech startups in the fight against the opioid crisis
Released: 18-Jan-2019 2:05 PM EST
UH Ventures program spotlights tech startups in the fight against the opioid crisis
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Recap of program featuring biotech startups building platforms in the fight against the opioid crisis.


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