Location: Local - Philly Metro

Filters close
4-Mar-2019 8:05 AM EST
Potential Treatment for Cancer in Butterfly Disease
Thomas Jefferson University

New research lays foundation for upcoming clinical trial for patients with epidermolysis bullosa

1-Mar-2019 11:35 AM EST
Permitting First-Year Doctors to Work Longer Shifts Does Not Create Chronic Sleep Loss or Reduce Patient Safety
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Two large national studies show that patient safety was unaffected and residents showed no signs of chronic sleep loss regardless of shift length.

5-Mar-2019 10:40 AM EST
New Small Molecule Inhibitors Show Potential for Treatment of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Cancers
Wistar Institute

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have created a drug candidate for cancers associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis.

Newswise: Cancer Most Frequently Spreads to the Liver. Here’s Why.
4-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EST
Cancer Most Frequently Spreads to the Liver. Here’s Why.
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

When cancer spreads to another organ, it most commonly moves to the liver, and now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they know why.

4-Mar-2019 6:00 PM EST
Bone Fractures Increasing as Seniors Walk Dogs to Stay Active
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Between 2004 and 2017, dog-walking-related fractures in people 65-or-older more than doubled

28-Feb-2019 1:00 PM EST
Disclosing Bed Bug Infestation to Potential Tenants Improves Public Health and Leads to Savings for Landlords
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Laws that require landlords to disclose bed bug infestations help combat the spread of the insects and protect the health of potential tenants. According to a new study, these laws also lead to cost savings, on average, for landlords within five years. Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published their findings today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Newswise: NCCN 2019 Annual Conference Includes Focus on Patient Experience with Innovative Therapies, Plus Updates on Biomarkers, Biosimilars, and the Latest Research on Cancer Care
Released: 4-Mar-2019 9:20 AM EST
NCCN 2019 Annual Conference Includes Focus on Patient Experience with Innovative Therapies, Plus Updates on Biomarkers, Biosimilars, and the Latest Research on Cancer Care
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

More than 1,500 cancer care professionals are meeting in Orlando, Florida, March 21-23, for the NCCN 2019 Annual Conference, presented by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)—an alliance of 28 leading cancer centers.

Released: 28-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
SCAD: What's Overlooked Can Be Fatal
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Recent research suggests heart attacks are becoming more common among women of younger ages. For decades, little was understood about SCAD -- the leading cause of pregnancy-associated heart attacks.

Newswise: Researchers Use Health Data Tools to Rapidly Detect Sepsis in Sick Newborns
Released: 28-Feb-2019 2:30 PM EST
Researchers Use Health Data Tools to Rapidly Detect Sepsis in Sick Newborns
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Automated programs can identify which sick infants in a neonatal intensive care unit have sepsis hours before clinicians recognize the life-threatening condition. A study team tested machine-learning models in a NICU population, drawing only on routinely collected data available in electronic health records.

Released: 28-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Online Reviews After 'Tummy Tuck' – Cosmetic Results Aren't the Only Factor Affecting Positive Ratings
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

For patients undergoing "tummy tuck" surgery (abdominoplasty), satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is the main factor affecting whether they write a positive or negative online review for their plastic surgeon, reports the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Released: 28-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST
More Women Are Training to Be Plastic Surgeons, but Racial/Ethnic Representation Still Lags Behind
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

While the proportion of women entering plastic surgery residency programs has increased in recent years, numbers of Black and Hispanic trainees are declining or unchanged, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Newswise: Penn Nursing Ranked #1 Nursing School in the World Four Years Running
Released: 28-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Penn Nursing Ranked #1 Nursing School in the World Four Years Running
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) remains the number one nursing school in the world according to a recent ranking by QS World University. The rankings highlight the world’s top universities in 48 different subject areas (as of 2019) based on academic reputation, employer reputation, and research impact. This is the fourth consecutive year that Penn Nursing has taken the top spot.

Newswise: To Beat Cancer, You’ve Got to Have Heart
Released: 28-Feb-2019 8:55 AM EST
To Beat Cancer, You’ve Got to Have Heart
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

When it comes to lifestyle changes that can help people avoid cancer, it turns out the heart has a lot to say on the matter.

Newswise: New Patient Resource from NCCN Clears up Confusion around Highly Common Type of Skin Cancer
Released: 28-Feb-2019 8:30 AM EST
New Patient Resource from NCCN Clears up Confusion around Highly Common Type of Skin Cancer
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Squamous Cell Skin Cancer explains risk factors and treatment options for cancer type that impacts millions every year.

Newswise: Online Intervention Shows Promise in HIV Prevention
Released: 26-Feb-2019 12:20 PM EST
Online Intervention Shows Promise in HIV Prevention
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

A team led by José Bauermeister, PhD, MPH, Presidential Professor of Nursing and Director of the Program on Sexuality, Technology, & Action Research (PSTAR), at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) designed the My Desires & Expectations (myDEx) tool to address cognitive and emotional factors that influence YGBMSM sexual decision-making when seeking partners online.

Newswise: An Existing Drug May Have Therapeutic Potential in Mitochondrial Disease
Released: 26-Feb-2019 12:15 PM EST
An Existing Drug May Have Therapeutic Potential in Mitochondrial Disease
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

New preclinical findings from extensive cell and animal studies suggest that cysteamine bitartrate, a drug already used for a rare kidney disease, could benefit patients with some mitochondrial disorders. No proven effective treatments yet exist for these complex conditions with severe energy deficiency

Released: 25-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST
Regaining Independence After Hip Fracture – Age Is the Most Important Predictor
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Most middle-aged and older adults recover their ability to live independently within a year after surgery for hip fracture, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 25-Feb-2019 9:30 AM EST
Penn Team Eradicates Hepatitis C in Nine Patients Following Lifesaving Heart Transplants from Infected Donors
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nine patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Released: 21-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Current Tools Have Low Accuracy for Predicting Delayed Ischemia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Both CT angiography and transcranial Doppler have limited accuracy in detecting cerebral vasospasm and predicting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured aneurysm, reports a study in the inaugural edition of Critical Care Explorations, the official open-access journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 21-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Price Transparency Helps Arizona Health System Achieve Financial Turnaround
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Efforts to understand costs and openly share information on healthcare prices played a key role in a major Arizona health system's successful turnaround from a financial crisis, according to a feature article in the Spring issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). This journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Integrating Heart Disease and Cancer Care Could Reduce Overall Health Care Costs, According to Researchers
Released: 20-Feb-2019 10:25 AM EST
Integrating Heart Disease and Cancer Care Could Reduce Overall Health Care Costs, According to Researchers
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

Study in JNCCN finds coronary artery disease costs increase dramatically in patients who are diagnosed with cancer.

Released: 20-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
Health-Related Google Searches Double in the Week Before ER Visits
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients were found to often be willing to share their Google search histories with medical researchers, revealing that many do searches on their health concerns long before deciding to go to the hospital.

Newswise: Children on the Autism Spectrum with Co-Occurring ADHD Symptoms Lag Behind in Key Measures of Independence and Communication
15-Feb-2019 9:40 AM EST
Children on the Autism Spectrum with Co-Occurring ADHD Symptoms Lag Behind in Key Measures of Independence and Communication
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A pair of new studies has provided new insight into the challenges faced by children on the autism spectrum who exhibit symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to the findings from researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), these children have difficulty with adaptive behavior, a key measure of independence.

Newswise: Researchers Key to Advance Care Planning With Cancer Clinical Trial Patients
Released: 18-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
Researchers Key to Advance Care Planning With Cancer Clinical Trial Patients
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Cancer clinical trials are an important option for patients with cancer. Yet, once a trial ends, patients still need care plans. Little is known at what point during clinical trial transitions to initiate advance planning discussions or how to educate research teams to communicate with and prepare patient-participants and their families for the next steps after they leave a cancer clinical trial.

Released: 18-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Temperatures Rising: Patients Taking Diuretics May See More Benefit by Upping Potassium Intake During Warmer Weather
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients taking diuretics are often at risk for low potassium levels, which can put patients at an increased risk of death from cardiac arrhythmias or other causes. But researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that taking prescription potassium supplements can reduce these patients’ risk by nearly 10 percent as daily outdoor temperatures increase—a time when patients may be at highest risk due to loss of potassium while sweating. These findings are detailed in a study published today in BMJ Open.

15-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
Penn Medicine and CHOP Study Finds that Fetal Signaling Pathways May Offer Future Targets for Treating Lung Injury
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new animal study describes how cells that become alveoli, the tiny compartments in which gas exchange occurs in the lung, begin their specialized roles very early in prenatal life. Investigating the fetal signaling pathways active in this biological event may offer future opportunities to treat lung damage caused by prematurity and other lung injuries.

Newswise: Mapping Brain Circuits in Newborns May Aid Early Detection of Autism
15-Feb-2019 1:00 PM EST
Mapping Brain Circuits in Newborns May Aid Early Detection of Autism
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A new map of newborn babies’ brains offers details of structure that will provide a new reference for researchers studying both typical brain development and neurological disorders. Using noninvasive, 20-minute MRI scans, researchers have revealed some of the complex and precisely organized brain architecture that emerges as the brain reshapes itself during the third trimester of pregnancy.

15-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
Specialized Lung Cells Appear Very Early in Development
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Specialized lung cells appear in the developing fetus much earlier than scientists previously thought. Investigating the fetal signaling pathways active in the biological events by which alveoli form may offer future opportunities to treat lung damage caused by prematurity and other lung injuries.

18-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST
New Insight Into the Balance Between the Tumor-suppressive and Tumor-promoting Effects of Cellular Senescence
Wistar Institute

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have described a novel role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) metabolism in the ability of senescent cells to release tumor-promoting molecules.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
Immune Profiling: A New Opportunity for Drug Development
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Collectively, assessing a snapshot of a person’s unique state of immune health is called immune profiling, which can entail identifying immune-cell-associated genes and proteins, as well as the cell types themselves.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Single Word Most Associated with Negative Hospital Reviews on Yelp is 'Told'
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A Penn Medicine research team found that the word “told” was tied to almost 20 percent of poor reviews

Released: 14-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
When Research Participation Pays, Some People Lie, Penn Study Suggests
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Offering compensation can be an important tactic to attract potential participants for enrollment in research studies, but it might come at a cost. A new study conducted by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that up to 23 percent of respondents lied about their eligibility to participate in a survey when offered payment, even small amounts.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST
Neural processing with trauma and adversity interact to increase core symptom of PTSD
Elsevier

Lifetime adversity and increased neural processing during a traumatic event combine to increase the frequency of intrusive traumatic memories and the distress they cause, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 10:00 AM EST
Combination of T Cell Therapy and Targeted Therapy as a Novel Strategy for Therapy-resistant Melanoma with Mutations in the BRAF Gene
Wistar Institute

Collaborative research by The Wistar Institute and Moffitt Cancer Center has demonstrated that BRAF targeted therapies render resistant melanoma more sensitive to the attack of killer T cells.

Released: 13-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
In Defense of Millennials, the Global Generation
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The word “millennial” isn’t exactly a compliment these days. The problem is, all the criticisms out there – “they’re too picky!” or “they’re entitled!” or “they spend all their money on lattes and avocado toast!” – have left it mostly with a negative connotation and rarely a positive one. Any praise for those born between 1981 and 1996 seems to be quickly drowned out by the headlines, memes, and social media posts reinforcing the same old stereotypes of an entire generation. But, in all fairness, millennials are also known to be altruistic, ambitious, and passionate about social injustices, more so than previous generations, many have argued. A USA Today article even described them as the most civic-minded generation in over half a century.

Newswise: New Book from Sociologist Daniel Laurison Explores the ‘Class Ceiling’
Released: 13-Feb-2019 10:20 AM EST
New Book from Sociologist Daniel Laurison Explores the ‘Class Ceiling’
Swarthmore College

In his new book, The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to Be Privileged, Assistant Professor of Sociology Daniel Laurison '99 investigates the ambiguities of meritocracy in white-collar workers’ salaries in the United Kingdom.

Released: 12-Feb-2019 11:30 AM EST
Annual 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Conference, sponsored by Temple University, returns to Philadelphia
Temple University

The 2019 Diversity & Inclusion Conference, held March 25-26 in Philadelphia, is an open forum to explore and exchange insights about diversity and inclusion (D&I) best practices for CEOs, diversity officers, educators, corporate leaders and government officials.

Released: 11-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
Potent marijuana edibles can pose a major unrecognized risk to patients with cardiovascular disease
Elsevier

Philadelphia, February 11, 2019 - As marijuana legalization sweeps North America, use of the substance has been on the rise, and the public's attitude is shifting. An increasing number of people believe that "weed" is the safest recreational drug, one that carries health benefits that outweigh its risks.

Released: 11-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST
Federal Funding Fueled Growth of Wistar Science in 2018
Wistar Institute

The Wistar Institute announces that it was awarded more than $16M in federal research funds in support of its groundbreaking research in cancer, immunology and infectious diseases.

5-Feb-2019 4:10 PM EST
Engineered DNA Vaccine Protects Against Emerging Mayaro Virus Infection
Wistar Institute

A novel, synthetic DNA vaccine developed at The Wistar Institute induces protective immunity against Mayaro virus (MAYV), a mosquito-borne infection endemic to South America, that has the potential to become a global emerging viral threat.

Released: 6-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
In Their DNA: Rotator Cuff Stem Cells More Likely to Develop into Fat Cells
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Why are fat deposits more likely to occur after tears of the shoulder’s rotator cuff, compared to other types of muscle injuries? An increased propensity of stem cells within with rotator cuff muscles to develop into fat cells may explain the difference, reports a study in the February 6, 2019 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 6-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
How Fibrosis Develops in Butterfly Syndrome Patients
Thomas Jefferson University

Researchers have pinpointed how fibrosis develops in butterfly syndrome patients. The discovery points to a potential treatment for the debilitating complication.

Released: 5-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
Investing in Culture of Health Reduces Employee Health Risks
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Companies that improve their "culture of health" realize some important benefits, including reductions in employee health risk factors, medical visits, prescription drug use, and healthcare costs, reports a study in the February Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Newswise: Diversity in the CD4 Receptor Protects Chimpanzees from Infection by AIDS-like Viruses
31-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
Diversity in the CD4 Receptor Protects Chimpanzees from Infection by AIDS-like Viruses
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

An international team of collaborators found that the CD4 surface protein, which is used by HIV and SIV as the receptor to enter immune cells, is highly variable among wild chimpanzees.

Released: 4-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Wolters Kluwer to Publish Journal of Psychosocial Oncology Research and Practice
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Wolters Kluwer, Health announced today that the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology Research & Practice, the newest journal of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), will be published under the Lippincott portfolio.

Newswise: Leary Appointed Penn Nursing’s First Director of Innovation
Released: 4-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
Leary Appointed Penn Nursing’s First Director of Innovation
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

In this role, Marion Leary, MSN, MPH, RN FAHA, will design and execute innovation programs and projects through Penn Nursing’s Office of Nursing Research (ONR) and will work to keep the School at the forefront of innovation in nursing. The appointment was effective February 1, 2019.

Released: 4-Feb-2019 12:30 PM EST
Saint Joseph’s University Bioethicist Calls for Safe Injection Sites; Proposes Customized Model for Philadelphia
Saint Joseph's University

University’s nationally-recognized Institute of Clinical Bioethics collaborates with local institutions on newly published paper proposing a model for safe injection sites designed to prevent the deaths of thousands of Philadelphians vulnerable to an opioid overdose.


Showing results

150 of 2963

close
3.50572