Feature Channels: Marine Science

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Released: 7-Aug-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs.

Newswise: Study Finds High Levels of Toxic Pollutants in Stranded Dolphins and Whales
Released: 6-Aug-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Study Finds High Levels of Toxic Pollutants in Stranded Dolphins and Whales
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a white-beaked dolphin and in Gervais’ beaked whales.

Newswise: New paper addresses mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, highlights risks of dumping in  ocean
6-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT
New paper addresses mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, highlights risks of dumping in ocean
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Ten years after the Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, radiation levels have fallen in all but the waters closest to the plant. But a new hazard exists and is growing every day in the number of storage tanks on land surrounding the power plant that hold contaminated wastewater.

Released: 5-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Speaker Change: International Year of Sound Events Explore Acoustics from Steelpan Music to Oceanography
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

The Acoustical Society of America continues to host virtual events in August as part of the International Year of Sound. The ASA Student Council will host Virtual Student Summer Talks for science students to present their research on topics ranging from acoustical oceanography to speech communication and Andrew Morrison will discuss how the acoustical physics of the steelpan helps machine learning algorithms process large datasets. All events are open to the public, and admission is free.

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Released: 4-Aug-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem
University of Exeter

Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won't solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows.

Newswise: Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
University of Vienna

Angel sharks are sharks, but with their peculiarly flat body they rather resemble rays. An international research team led by Faviel A. López-Romero and Jürgen Kriwet of the Institute of Palaeontology has now investigated the origin of this body shape. The results illustrate how these sharks evolved into highly specialised, exclusively bottom-dwelling ambush predators and thus also contribute to a better understanding of their threat from environmental changes.

Newswise: Dolphin Calf Entangled in Fishing Line Only Lived Two Years Following Rescue
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Dolphin Calf Entangled in Fishing Line Only Lived Two Years Following Rescue
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers examined the outcome of an entangled bottlenose dolphin calf with monofilament fishing line wrapped tightly around its upper jaw. It was successfully disentangled and immediately released it back into its natural habitat. Surviving only two years, results showed long-term severe damage due to this entanglement including emaciation. There are about 1,000 bottlenose dolphins that live in the Indian River Lagoon, which also is a very popular location for recreational fishing.

Released: 30-Jul-2020 5:55 PM EDT
COVID-19: Social media users more likely to believe false information
McGill University

A new study led by researchers at McGill University finds that people who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19.

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Released: 30-Jul-2020 5:25 PM EDT
Whale 'snot' reveals likely poor health during migration
University of New South Wales

Whale-watching season is delighting the viewing public along the east Australian coast but while it's a boon for the tourism industry, for the majestic humpback whale it's potentially a time of less optimal health.

Newswise: Deep-sea anglerfishes have evolved a new type of immune system
Released: 30-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Deep-sea anglerfishes have evolved a new type of immune system
University of Washington

Deep-sea anglerfishes employ an incredible reproductive strategy. Tiny dwarfed males become permanently attached to relatively gigantic females, fuse their tissues and then establish a common blood circulation. Now scientists have figured out why female anglerfishes so readily accept their male mates. Their findings are published July 30 in Science.

Released: 30-Jul-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What’s in your shellfish?
University of California, Irvine

The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders.

Newswise: Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
24-Jul-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology have studied the transport of 29 PFAS into and out of the Arctic Ocean, detecting a newer compound for the first time in Arctic seawater.

Newswise: Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
24-Jul-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have shown that mussels form weaker attachments in iron-deficient seawater, revealing a possible consequence of altered iron bioavailability in oceans.

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Released: 28-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
How the zebrafish got its stripes
University of Bath

Animal patterns - the stripes, spots and rosettes seen in the wild - are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have developed a robust mathematical model to explain how one important species, the zebrafish, develops its stripes.

Newswise: WHOI receives $2.7M from Simons Foundation to study nutrients, microbes that fuel ocean food web
Released: 27-Jul-2020 8:35 AM EDT
WHOI receives $2.7M from Simons Foundation to study nutrients, microbes that fuel ocean food web
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Simons Foundation has awarded Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) two grants totaling $2.7 million to study key processes that help fuel the health of our ocean and planet.

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Released: 24-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Discovery of first active seep in Antarctica provides new understanding of methane cycle
Oregon State University

The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Reef sharks in decline
University of California, Santa Barbara

Though many people find them intimidating, menacing or just plain scary, sharks are vital to the health of the world's oceans.

Newswise: Battling harmful algae blooms
Released: 23-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Battling harmful algae blooms
University of Delaware

In two separate studies, the University of Delaware’s Kathryn Coyne is looking at why one species of algae has some strains that can cause fish kills and others that are non-toxic, while examining an algicidal bacterium found in Delaware’s Inland Bays that could provide an environmentally-friendly approach to combatting algae blooms.

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Released: 22-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks
Dartmouth College

A citizen science program that began over a decade ago has confirmed the use of dragonflies to measure mercury pollution, according to a study in Environmental Science & Technology.

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Released: 22-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Plastics found in sea-bed sharks
University of Exeter

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast.

Newswise:Video Embedded biotelemetry-provides-unique-glimpse-into-whitespotted-eagle-rays-behavior2
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jul-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Biotelemetry Provides Unique Glimpse into Whitespotted Eagle Rays’ Behavior
Florida Atlantic University

Using uniquely coded transmitters and acoustic telemetry, a study is the first to characterize the ecology and fine-scale habitat use of whitespotted rays in Florida while also identifying areas of potential interactions between this species and multiple environmental threats. Biotelemetry provided unique insights into this species’ occupancy, which is not apparent at the landscape-scale. Prolonged observations showed affinities for habitats of considerable recreational and commercial importance, like inlets, channels, and clam aquaculture lease sites close to shore.

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Released: 21-Jul-2020 7:45 PM EDT
Eating habits of baby predator starfish revealed
University of Sydney

Adult crown-of-thorns starfish pose one of the greatest threats to the Great Barrier Reef due to their coral diet.

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Released: 21-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world
University of British Columbia

Fish market favourites such as orange roughy, common octopus and pink conch are among the species of fish and invertebrates in rapid decline around the world, according to new research.

Newswise: Bright Spots Could Be Key to Securing the Future of Declining Coral Reefs
Released: 21-Jul-2020 9:20 AM EDT
Bright Spots Could Be Key to Securing the Future of Declining Coral Reefs
Florida State University

In recent decades, the decline of living hard coral on reefs around the world has raised concerns among marine experts. For years, the presumption was that decline signaled that an entire reef’s future was threatened. A study by Florida State University researchers shows that might not always be the case. While a complement of healthy coral is still preferred, dead or dying coral might not be fatal for an entire reef.

Newswise: Immune system adaptations in cavefish may provide autoimmune disease insight
15-Jul-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Immune system adaptations in cavefish may provide autoimmune disease insight
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Cavefish may not seem like a big deal. They’re small, they live in tucked away places humans rarely go, and they’re common enough that you can find them on every continent except Antarctica. But researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research see them as a potential way to understand more about the rise in autoimmune diseases in humans.

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Released: 17-Jul-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Antarctica more widely impacted by humans than previously thought
University of the Witwatersrand

Antarctica is considered one of the Earth's largest, most pristine remaining wildernesses. Yet since its formal discovery 200 years ago, the continent has seen accelerating and potentially impactful human activity.

Released: 17-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Baleen whales have changed their distribution in the Western North Atlantic
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Researchers have been using passive acoustic recordings of whale calls to track their movements.

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Released: 17-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens
University of California, Berkeley

Widespread use of pesticides and other agrochemicals can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

Newswise: WHOI Scientists, Staff, and Students Make Woods Hole Film Festival Appearance
Released: 17-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
WHOI Scientists, Staff, and Students Make Woods Hole Film Festival Appearance
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists are featured in two short films at this year’s Woods Hole Film Festival (WHFF). In addition, scientists will also participate in Q&A sessions connected to three of the festival’s feature-length, ocean-themed entries.

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Released: 16-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing
University of New South Wales

In a boost for both recreational fishing and the environment, new UNSW research shows that artificial reefs can increase fish abundance in estuaries with little natural reef.

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Released: 16-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Wonders of animal migration: How sea turtles find small, isolated islands
Swansea University

One of Charles Darwin's long-standing questions on how turtles find their way to islands has been answered thanks to a pioneering study by scientists.

Newswise: Study First to Show Tiger Sharks’ Travels and Desired Hangouts in the Gulf of Mexico
Released: 15-Jul-2020 5:50 PM EDT
Study First to Show Tiger Sharks’ Travels and Desired Hangouts in the Gulf of Mexico
Florida Atlantic University

Using sophisticated satellite telemetry, a study is the first to provide unique insights into how tiger sharks move and use habitats in the Gulf of Mexico across life-stages. Data provide an important baseline for comparison against, and/or predicting their vulnerability to future environmental change such as climate variability or oil spills.

Newswise: bSCp5l4w_7kXRZvOZrA-e-mwCgs8lJEid3OTYOOA30n1ICxDIzmj-SYOFXVr7Ve6LWaZKcYftpJ1fVUiS0oHyGuB7awP_ScvmE10QzkFtT9X99nU6i9R11fYNTqb-N57WCE_x2DPmRu9xNUbjDS-Q6dnKQkapxcAz_pt3qqzqSfcb_QrMH1QTKT4vk0lrrANtbmNGThaBDb36N9wzow=s0-
9-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Movements of Tiger Sharks at Varying Life Stages Tracked in Gulf of Mexico
PLOS

A tracking study of 56 sharks provides a first look at how their patterns of movement across the Gulf of Mexico vary according to their sex, their life stage, and the season.

Newswise: Periods of Ice-Free Arctic Seas Could Bring More Ocean Noise in Changing Marine Habitats
AUDIO
Released: 14-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Periods of Ice-Free Arctic Seas Could Bring More Ocean Noise in Changing Marine Habitats
Wildlife Conservation Society

Scientists examining levels of ocean noise in the Bering Sea—an important migratory seascape for whales, walruses, seals, and other acoustically sensitive animals—have confirmed that the presence of sea ice plays a central role in the soundscape of these Arctic waters. A growing concern is that the disappearance of sea ice due to a changing climate could mean a marine realm increasingly filled with shipping and other human-related ocean noise, according to scientists from Southall Environmental Associates, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), and other groups in a new study.

Released: 14-Jul-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Ancient oyster shells provide historical insights
University of Georgia

Scientists studying thousands of oyster shells along the Georgia coast, some as old as 4,500 years, have published new insights into how Native Americans sustained oyster harvests for thousands of years, observations that may lead to better management practices of oyster reefs today.

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Released: 14-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Pesticide mixtures a bigger problem than previously thought
University of Queensland

New research led by The University of Queensland has provided the first comprehensive analysis of pesticide mixtures in creeks and rivers discharging to the Great Barrier Reef.

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Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
University of Queensland

Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries.

Newswise:Video Embedded like-humans-beluga-whales-form-social-networks-beyond-family-ties
VIDEO
Released: 10-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Like Humans, Beluga Whales Form Social Networks Beyond Family Ties
Florida Atlantic University

A groundbreaking study is the first to analyze the relationship between group behaviors, group type, group dynamics, and kinship of beluga whales in 10 locations across the Arctic. Results show that not only do beluga whales regularly interact with close kin, including close maternal kin, they also frequently associate with more distantly related and unrelated individuals. Findings will improve the understanding of why some species are social, how individuals learn from group members and how animal cultures emerge.

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Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Revealing winners & losers in projected future climates
Flinders University

New research reveals how winners & losers from climate change can be identified based on their ability to adapt to rising future temperatures.

Newswise: A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
Released: 9-Jul-2020 1:45 PM EDT
A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
University of Delaware

Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites have now been found to have more energy available and a higher population turnover. Deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the material coming up from the bottom, which means that the seep could be supporting a larger amount of biomass than previously thought.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
University of Southern Denmark

Fish kills are a recurring phenomenon in lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. Often the kills are triggered by factors like an algae bloom, but now a new study reports on a new, climate-related cause of fish kills.

Newswise: NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Nova Southeastern University

As the planet’s land-based natural resources become exhausted, the need for new sources is bringing the search to the deepest parts of the world’s oceans. And that has researchers across the globe very concerned.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
FSU experts available to comment on geochemical effects of Saharan dust cloud
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: July 1, 2020 | 1:25 pm | SHARE: More dust from the Sahara Desert is forecast to come to the United States this week. The massive dust plume known as the Saharan Air Layer has a myriad of effects on air quality, fertilizing ecosystems and more.Florida State University has experts available to comment on some of the surprising features related to the meteorological phenomenon.

Newswise: New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Wildlife Conservation Society

MERMAID, an open-source tech platform for marine scientists, is for the first time launching an interactive map that provides an insider’s view of the ecosystem data collected from coral reefs by field scientists around the world.

Newswise: WHOI Researcher Dives to Challenger Deep
Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
WHOI Researcher Dives to Challenger Deep
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researcher became one of just a handful of people to visit the deepest part of the ocean following a successful dive in the deep-submergence vehicle Limiting Factor on Monday.

Newswise:Video Embedded dolphins-learn-in-similar-ways-to-great-apes
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
University of Zurich

Dolphins use unusual techniques to obtain food: One of them, called "shelling", is used by the dolphins in Shark Bay in Western Australia. Dolphins in this population trap fishes inside large empty gastropod shells.

Newswise: Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a ‘halo’ with fewer harmful algae, new method shows
Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:50 PM EDT
Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a ‘halo’ with fewer harmful algae, new method shows
University of Washington

Genetic clues show that eelgrass growing underwater along Puget Sound shorelines is associated with fewer of the single-celled algae that produce harmful toxins in shellfish. The evidence shows this effect extends 45 feet beyond the edge of the eelgrass bed.

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Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK (NOC), the University of Hawai'i, and the University of Geneva


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