Feature Channels: Marine Science

Filters close
Newswise: 236860_web.jpg
Released: 13-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
University of Queensland

Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries.

Newswise:Video Embedded like-humans-beluga-whales-form-social-networks-beyond-family-ties
VIDEO
Released: 10-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Like Humans, Beluga Whales Form Social Networks Beyond Family Ties
Florida Atlantic University

A groundbreaking study is the first to analyze the relationship between group behaviors, group type, group dynamics, and kinship of beluga whales in 10 locations across the Arctic. Results show that not only do beluga whales regularly interact with close kin, including close maternal kin, they also frequently associate with more distantly related and unrelated individuals. Findings will improve the understanding of why some species are social, how individuals learn from group members and how animal cultures emerge.

Newswise: 237181_web.jpg
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Revealing winners & losers in projected future climates
Flinders University

New research reveals how winners & losers from climate change can be identified based on their ability to adapt to rising future temperatures.

Newswise: A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
Released: 9-Jul-2020 1:45 PM EDT
A New Look at Deep-Sea Microbes
University of Delaware

Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites have now been found to have more energy available and a higher population turnover. Deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the material coming up from the bottom, which means that the seep could be supporting a larger amount of biomass than previously thought.

Newswise: 237000_web.jpg
Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
University of Southern Denmark

Fish kills are a recurring phenomenon in lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. Often the kills are triggered by factors like an algae bloom, but now a new study reports on a new, climate-related cause of fish kills.

Newswise: NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Nova Southeastern University

As the planet’s land-based natural resources become exhausted, the need for new sources is bringing the search to the deepest parts of the world’s oceans. And that has researchers across the globe very concerned.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 236720_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
FSU experts available to comment on geochemical effects of Saharan dust cloud
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: July 1, 2020 | 1:25 pm | SHARE: More dust from the Sahara Desert is forecast to come to the United States this week. The massive dust plume known as the Saharan Air Layer has a myriad of effects on air quality, fertilizing ecosystems and more.Florida State University has experts available to comment on some of the surprising features related to the meteorological phenomenon.

Newswise: New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Wildlife Conservation Society

MERMAID, an open-source tech platform for marine scientists, is for the first time launching an interactive map that provides an insider’s view of the ecosystem data collected from coral reefs by field scientists around the world.

Newswise: WHOI Researcher Dives to Challenger Deep
Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
WHOI Researcher Dives to Challenger Deep
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researcher became one of just a handful of people to visit the deepest part of the ocean following a successful dive in the deep-submergence vehicle Limiting Factor on Monday.

Newswise:Video Embedded dolphins-learn-in-similar-ways-to-great-apes
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
University of Zurich

Dolphins use unusual techniques to obtain food: One of them, called "shelling", is used by the dolphins in Shark Bay in Western Australia. Dolphins in this population trap fishes inside large empty gastropod shells.

Newswise: Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a ‘halo’ with fewer harmful algae, new method shows
Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:50 PM EDT
Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a ‘halo’ with fewer harmful algae, new method shows
University of Washington

Genetic clues show that eelgrass growing underwater along Puget Sound shorelines is associated with fewer of the single-celled algae that produce harmful toxins in shellfish. The evidence shows this effect extends 45 feet beyond the edge of the eelgrass bed.

Newswise: 235594_web.jpg
Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK (NOC), the University of Hawai'i, and the University of Geneva

Newswise: 235608_web.jpg
Released: 24-Jun-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Movers and stayers: Surviving a range shift due to climate change
University of Technology, Sydney

The global redistribution of marine and terrestrial species due to climate change is a major concern for conservation planners and resource managers.

Newswise: 235399_web.jpg
Released: 23-Jun-2020 8:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution today (22 June), the leaders of a new global initiative explain how research during this devastating health crisis can inspire innovative strategies for sharing space on this increasingly crowded planet, with benefits for both wildlife and humans.

Newswise: 235333_web.jpg
Released: 22-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Seasonal sea ice changes hold clues to controlling CO2 levels, ancient ice shows
University of New South Wales

Sea ice across the Southern Ocean played a crucial role in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change - and it could provide a critical resource to improve Earth system models, a new study shows.

Newswise: Study Finds Only 2.5 Percent of the World’s Coral Reefs Are Currently Being Actively Protected
Released: 19-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Study Finds Only 2.5 Percent of the World’s Coral Reefs Are Currently Being Actively Protected
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new global study has found that only 2.5 percent of tropical reefs are formally protected and conserved through laws and regulations. These numbers are significantly lower than previous estimates, and highlight an urgent need for governments, communities, and partnering organizations to create and expand marine reserves to protect these ecosystems which support more than 500 million people worldwide.

Released: 17-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Antarctic sea ice loss explained in new study
British Antarctic Survey

Scientists have discovered that the summer sea ice in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica has decreased by one million square kilometres - an area twice the size of Spain - in the last five years, with implications for the marine ecosystem. The findings are published this month (June 2020) in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Newswise: 234836_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Fish evolution in action: Land fish forced to adapt after leap out of water
University of New South Wales

A diverse diet and flexible behaviour may have empowered blenny fish to make a dramatic transition out of the water - but once on land, they have been forced to become specialised, a new study led by UNSW shows.

Newswise: World’s Most Complete Health Analysis of Nesting Sea Turtles Conducted in Florida
Released: 16-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
World’s Most Complete Health Analysis of Nesting Sea Turtles Conducted in Florida
Florida Atlantic University

The most comprehensive health assessment for a green turtle rookery in the world to date is providing critical insights into various aspects of physiology, biology, and herpesvirus epidemiology of this nesting population. Findings are hopeful for this population of green sea turtles in southeastern Florida, offer important data on the profile of health for future comparative investigations, and suggest that viruses are endemically stable in this nesting population.

Newswise: NUS researchers uncover mysterious tanaids
Released: 16-Jun-2020 7:05 AM EDT
NUS researchers uncover mysterious tanaids
National University of Singapore

Research Associate Mr Chim Chee Kong and Research Assistant Ms Samantha Tong from the Tropical Marine Science Institute at the National University of Singapore (NUS) are on a quest to discover the many nameless tanaids in the world, specifically in the relatively species-rich but poorly studied tropical Indo-Pacific.

Newswise: The many lifetimes of plastics
Released: 15-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
The many lifetimes of plastics
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They’re a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

Newswise: Protecting Bays From Ocean Acidification
Released: 12-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Protecting Bays From Ocean Acidification
University of Delaware

While there was a bay-wide decline of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) from the 1960s through the 1980s, restoring these once-abundant SAV beds has been a primary outcome of efforts to reduce loads of nutrients and sediments to the estuary and SAV cover has increased by 300 percent from 1984 to 2015. One of the largest recovered SAV beds lies in an area of the bay known as the Susquehanna Flats—a broad, tidal freshwater region located near the mouth of the Susquehanna River at the head of the bay.

Newswise: Marine Energy Devices Likely Pose Minimal Impacts to Marine Life, Report Shows
Released: 8-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Marine Energy Devices Likely Pose Minimal Impacts to Marine Life, Report Shows
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

On World Oceans Day, an international team of marine scientists reports that the potential impact of marine renewable energy to marine life is likely small or undetectable, though there is still uncertainty around some issues.

Newswise: Great White Shark Diet Surprises Scientists
Released: 8-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Great White Shark Diet Surprises Scientists
University of Sydney

Understanding how sharks feed is vital for managing human interactions

Released: 8-Jun-2020 12:10 AM EDT
American lobster, sea scallop habitat could shift off the northeast
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Researchers have projected significant changes in the habitat of commercially important American lobster and sea scallops on the Northeast U.S. continental shelf.

Newswise: Expedition to Service Pioneer Array Departing Woods Hole, Sunday 7 June
Released: 5-Jun-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Expedition to Service Pioneer Array Departing Woods Hole, Sunday 7 June
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

After weeks of preparation, isolation, and testing, a science team will depart on the R/V Neil Armstrong from Woods Hole, MA for an 11-day expedition.

Newswise: Mangrove Trees Won’t Survive Sea-Level Rise by 2050 if Emissions Aren’t Cut
Released: 4-Jun-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Mangrove Trees Won’t Survive Sea-Level Rise by 2050 if Emissions Aren’t Cut
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Mangrove trees – valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates – won’t survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren’t reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science. Mangrove forests store large amounts of carbon, help protect coastlines and provide habitat for fish and other species. Using sediment data from the last 10,000 years, an international team led by Macquarie University in Australia estimated the chances of mangrove survival based on rates of sea-level rise.

Newswise:Video Embedded good-night-satellite-data-uncovers-dolphins-on-the-move-at-nighttime
VIDEO
Released: 2-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Good Night? Satellite Data Uncovers Dolphins on the Move at Nighttime
Florida Atlantic University

More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in Florida’s Indian River Lagoon year-round. Although extensively studied, what they do at nighttime is still a mystery. Using satellite telemetry, scientists provide the first documentation that these dolphins have a larger range that encompasses more habitats than previously thought. They regularly leave the brackish waters of the estuarine system and, not only travel into the ocean, but swim substantial distances – up to 20 kilometers – up freshwater rivers, creeks, and canals.

Newswise: Are natural toxins in fish harmful?
Released: 2-Jun-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Are natural toxins in fish harmful?
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Researchers investigate ‘PCB-like’ chemicals made by Mother Nature

Newswise:Video Embedded climate-change-an-imminent-threat-to-glass-sponge-reefs
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge reefs
University of British Columbia

Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new UBC research.

Newswise: Measuring Climate Change
Released: 1-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Measuring Climate Change
University of Delaware

University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai teamed with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists, as well as professors and professionals from numerous research institutes, to conduct an in-depth study that looks at carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the coastal oceans of North America.

Newswise: Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
29-May-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
University of Bristol

The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.

Newswise: A rising tide of marine disease? How parasites respond to a warming world
Released: 29-May-2020 2:35 PM EDT
A rising tide of marine disease? How parasites respond to a warming world
University of Washington

A recent study from the University of Washington explores the ways parasitism will respond to climate change, providing researchers new insights into disease transmission. The paper was published May 18 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution.

Newswise: Lab shutdowns enable speedier investigation of coral disease
Released: 29-May-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Lab shutdowns enable speedier investigation of coral disease
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Research labs have shut down around the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that hasn’t stopped scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) from investigating critical problems in the ocean.

Newswise: The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
Released: 29-May-2020 6:20 AM EDT
The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
University of Washington

The most common organism in the world’s oceans — and possibly the whole planet — harbors a virus in its DNA. This virus may have helped it survive and outcompete other organisms.

Newswise:Video Embedded fishing-less-could-be-a-win-for-both-lobstermen-and-endangered-whales
VIDEO
Released: 27-May-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Fishing less could be a win for both lobstermen and endangered whales
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that New England’s historic lobster fishery may turn a higher profit by operating with less gear in the water and a shorter season.

Released: 22-May-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Sea Turtle Nesting Season in Full Swing, UCF Researchers Keep Working Despite COVID-19
University of Central Florida

While uncertainty reigns for Floridians due to COVID-19, there’s one thing they can count on: sea turtles are nesting on our local beaches as nesting season heads into its fourth month this June.

Newswise: Journey to uncover mysteries of the Pacific Ocean
Released: 22-May-2020 7:20 AM EDT
Journey to uncover mysteries of the Pacific Ocean
National University of Singapore

Nine National University of Singapore researchers were part of a team that went on a five-week long voyage to the Pacific Ocean’s Clarion-Clipperton Zone to obtain baseline data on the biodiversity of abyssal polymetallic nodule fields.

Newswise: New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Released: 21-May-2020 5:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds That Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study investigating the links between coastal communities and coral reefs in Kenya and Madagascar has found that access to education and markets can help mitigate acute vulnerabilities for communities struggling with poverty and reliant on ecosystems degraded by overfishing.

Newswise: Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
18-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of Zurich have shown that the Titanichthys – a giant armoured fish that lived in the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380-million-years ago – fed in a similar manner to modern day basking sharks.

Newswise: Strong Sharing Networks Can Help Communities Rebound From Crises
Released: 15-May-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Strong Sharing Networks Can Help Communities Rebound From Crises
Wildlife Conservation Society

Of the top five countries in the world most at risk to disasters, three are Pacific Island nations. Yet time and time again, Pacific Islanders exhibit marked abilities to quickly recover. Part of the reason may be due to strong social networks that help to distribute resources to those most in need, say marine scientists from the University of Hawaiʿi, National Geographic Society and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) in a new study.

Newswise: Ocean ‘breathability’ key to past, future habitat of West Coast marine species
Released: 15-May-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Ocean ‘breathability’ key to past, future habitat of West Coast marine species
University of Washington

Historical observations collected off California since the 1950s suggest that anchovies thrive where the water is breathable — a combination of the oxygen levels in the water and the species’ oxygen needs, which are affected by temperature. Future projections suggest that the waters off Mexico and Southern California could be uninhabitable by 2100.

Newswise: Ocean explorer and filmmaker James Cameron to host virtual event on Extreme Ocean Machines
Released: 15-May-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Ocean explorer and filmmaker James Cameron to host virtual event on Extreme Ocean Machines
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

On May 20, ocean explorer and world-renowned filmmaker James Cameron will host a special edition of Ocean Encounters, a popular virtual event series from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Newswise:Video Embedded can-t-touch-this-video-shows-blacktip-sharks-use-shallow-water-to-flee-huge-predators2
VIDEO
Released: 13-May-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Can’t Touch This! Video Shows Blacktip Sharks Use Shallow Water to Flee Huge Predators
Florida Atlantic University

Aerial drone footage provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks using shallow waters as a refuge from a huge predator – the great hammerhead. Before this study, documentation of adult sharks swimming in shallower waters to avoid predation did not exist. Unmanned aerial vehicles enable scientists to unobtrusively observe behaviors in the wild, providing insight into seldom-seen predator-prey interactions. When it comes to sharks, this “hammerhead” time video proves you “can’t touch this.”

Newswise: URI appoints NASA scientist to lead Graduate School of Oceanography
Released: 11-May-2020 2:15 PM EDT
URI appoints NASA scientist to lead Graduate School of Oceanography
University of Rhode Island

KINGSTON, R.I. – MAY 11, 2020 – The University of Rhode has announced the appointment of NASA scientist Paula S. Bontempi as dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography. An alumna of GSO and a biological oceanographer for more than 25 years, Bontempi joins URI from the Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate of NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.

Newswise: 231160_web.jpg
Released: 8-May-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Prehistoric sea creatures evolved pebble-shaped teeth to crush shellfish
Field Museum

As bad as things might seem here in 2020, they could be worse: we could be living 252 million years ago during the Permian mass extinction.

Newswise: 230995_web.jpg
Released: 7-May-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
University of Plymouth

Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey, in a fossil dating back almost 200 million years.


Showing results

150 of 1679

close
1.51277