Feature Channels: Marine Science

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Newswise: Do Stickleback Fish Provide a Roadmap of Rapid Species Evolution?
Released: 18-Jun-2021 5:25 PM EDT
Do Stickleback Fish Provide a Roadmap of Rapid Species Evolution?
Stony Brook University

The Threespine stickleback fish is known to have evolved independently from its marine ancestors, a process called parallel evolution. A new study details the genomic changes that drive their rapid evolution, the findings from which may shed light on the process of natural selection in other species.

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Released: 18-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
VIMS study uncovers new cause for intensification of oyster disease
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

A new paper in Scientific Reports led by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science challenges increased salinity and seawater temperatures as the established explanation for a decades-long increase in the prevalence and deadliness of a major oyster disease in the coastal waters of the mid-Atlantic.

Newswise: Numerical Study First to Reveal Origin of ‘Motion of the Ocean’ in the Straits of Florida
Released: 17-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Numerical Study First to Reveal Origin of ‘Motion of the Ocean’ in the Straits of Florida
Florida Atlantic University

Using a numerical model that simulates ocean currents, researchers are shedding light on the important “motion of the ocean” in the Straits of Florida. They have conducted a first-of-its-kind study identifying the mechanisms behind the formation of sub-mesoscale eddies, which have important environmental implications and play a significant role in the health of the Florida Keys coral reef ecosystem.

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Released: 16-Jun-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Microbes in ocean play important role in moderating Earth's temperature
Harvard University

Methane is a strong greenhouse gas that plays a key role in Earth's climate. Anytime we use natural gas, whether we light up our kitchen stove or barbeque, we are using methane.

Newswise: Underwater Robot Offers New Insight Into Mid-Ocean “Twilight Zone”
Released: 16-Jun-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Underwater Robot Offers New Insight Into Mid-Ocean “Twilight Zone”
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

An innovative underwater robot known as Mesobot is providing researchers with deeper insight into the vast mid-ocean region known as the “twilight zone.” Capable of tracking and recording high-resolution images of slow-moving and fragile zooplankton, gelatinous animals, and particles, Mesobot greatly expands scientists’ ability to observe creatures in their mesopelagic habitat with minimal disturbance. This advance in engineering will enable greater understanding of the role these creatures play in transporting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to the deep sea, as well as how commercial exploitation of twilight zone fisheries might affect the marine ecosystem.

14-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Making a Meal of DNA in the Seafloor
University of Vienna

While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.

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Released: 11-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Combating Maritime Litter
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon

Plastic bottles drifting in the sea; bags in the stomachs of turtles; Covid-19 masks dancing in the surf: few images are as unpleasant to look at as those that show the contamination of our oceans.

Newswise: Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
Released: 10-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
University of Washington

Endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. The results provide insight into a poorly studied population and suggest conservation measures should include this region.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
The survivability of animal species depends on the number of offspring
Tel Aviv University

Researchers from Tel Aviv University took part in a new international study proposing an amendment to the widely accepted theory on the extinction of animal species - by moving the focus from the animal's body size to its reproductive capacity.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Artificial light harming clownfish
University of Melbourne

Young clownfish living closest to shore are dying faster than those further offshore because they are being exposed to artificial lighting, says an international research team.

Newswise: Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Released: 10-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Solving Plastic Pollution and Climate Change Simultaneously
Newswise Trends

Checkout how sea is degraded with plastic and impact of pollution on land and sea.

Released: 8-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
Deforestation darkening the seas above world's second biggest reef
University of Southampton

Converting Central American tropical forests into agricultural land is changing the colour and composition of natural material washing into nearby rivers, making it less likely to decompose before it reaches the ocean, a new Southampton-led study has shown.

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Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Sea Turtle Week: FSU Marine Biologist Available to Comment on Importance of these Keystone Species
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: June 7, 2021 | 2:14 pm | SHARE: Sea turtles have existed on Earth for more than 100 million years.But today, most species of these oceangoing reptiles are threatened or endangered. Scientists and resource managers are working to better understand and manage their populations, and they’re using work like that led by Mariana Fuentes, an associate professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science at Florida State University.

Newswise: Papers Explore Massive Plankton Blooms with Very Different Ecosystem Impacts
Released: 7-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Papers Explore Massive Plankton Blooms with Very Different Ecosystem Impacts
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Two new papers explore this question and provide examples of conditions that lead to massive plankton blooms with vastly different potential impacts on the ecosystem, according to McGillicuddy, co-author of both papers. Both papers also point to importance of using advanced technology—including Video Plankton Recorders, autonomous underwater vehicles, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative’s Coastal Pioneer Array—to find and monitor these blooms.

Newswise: New invasive fish discovered, threatening waters of southern United States
Released: 7-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
New invasive fish discovered, threatening waters of southern United States
Case Western Reserve University

The discovery of the Lowland Cichlid (Herichthys carpintis) spells bad news for natural-resource managers and conservationists already contending with the Rio Grande Cichlid, especially in Louisiana.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Climate warming to increase carbon loss in Canadian peatland by 103 per cent
University of Waterloo

Carbon loss in Canadian peatland is projected to increase by 103 per cent under a high emission scenario, according to new research led by scientists from the University of Waterloo.

Newswise: Sea snakes show their sensitive side to court potential mates
Released: 7-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Sea snakes show their sensitive side to court potential mates
University of Adelaide

Decades of research has revealed the remarkable morphological adaptations of sea snakes to aquatic life, which include paddle-shaped tails, salt-excreting glands, and the ability to breathe through their skin. In a new study published in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers at the University of Adelaide detail the enlarged touch receptors that evolved in male turtle-headed sea snakes (Emydocephalus annulatus), to help them locate and court females in aquatic environments.

Newswise: Conserving coastal seaweed: a must have for migrating sea birds
Released: 6-Jun-2021 8:05 PM EDT
Conserving coastal seaweed: a must have for migrating sea birds
University of South Australia

As Australia officially enters winter, UniSA ecologists are urging coastal communities to embrace all that the season brings, including the sometimes-unwelcome deposits of brown seaweed that can accumulate on the southern shores.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Study confirms invasive lionfish now threaten species along Brazilian coast
California Academy of Sciences

Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems--particularly coral reefs--from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Declining fish biodiversity poses risks for human nutrition
Cornell University

All fish are not created equal, at least when it comes to nutritional benefits. This truth has important implications for how declining fish biodiversity can affect human nutrition, according to a computer modeling study led by Cornell and Columbia University researchers.

Released: 1-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
A ‘jolt’ for ocean carbon sequestration
Washington University in St. Louis

Global oceans absorb about 25% of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere when fossil fuels are burned. Electricity-eating bacteria known as photoferrotrophs could provide a boost to this essential process, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.Scientists led by Arpita Bose, assistant professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, found that bacteria found in brackish sediments can “eat” electricity and, in the process, absorb and lock away climate-warming carbon dioxide.

Newswise: Browning Could Make Lakes Less Productive, Affecting Food Webs and Fish
Released: 1-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Browning Could Make Lakes Less Productive, Affecting Food Webs and Fish
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

As more dissolved organic matter enters lakes across the northeast United States, darkening the lakes in a phenomena called “browning,” research published today in Limnology and Oceanography Letters shows that these waters may be growing less productive and able to sustain less life.

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Released: 28-May-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Plastic in Galapagos seawater, beaches and animals
University of Exeter

Plastic pollution has been found in seawater, on beaches and inside marine animals at the Galapagos Islands.

Newswise: Seabirds face dire threats from climate change, human activity — especially in Northern Hemisphere
Released: 27-May-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Seabirds face dire threats from climate change, human activity — especially in Northern Hemisphere
University of Washington

Many seabirds in the Northern Hemisphere are struggling to breed — and in the Southern Hemisphere, they may not be far behind. These are the conclusions of a study, published May 28 in Science, analyzing more than 50 years of breeding records for 67 seabird species worldwide.

Newswise: Some Forams Could Thrive with Climate Change, Metabolism Study Finds
Released: 27-May-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Some Forams Could Thrive with Climate Change, Metabolism Study Finds
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole, Mass. (May 27, 2021) - With the expansion of oxygen-depleted waters in the oceans due to climate change, some species of foraminifera (forams, a type of protist or single-celled eukaryote) that thrive in those conditions could be big winners, biologically speaking.

Newswise:Video Embedded surge-in-nitrogen-has-turned-sargassum-into-the-world-s-largest-harmful-algal-bloom
VIDEO
Released: 24-May-2021 4:30 PM EDT
Surge in Nitrogen Has Turned Sargassum into the World’s Largest Harmful Algal Bloom
Florida Atlantic University

Scientists have discovered dramatic changes in the chemistry and composition of Sargassum, floating brown seaweed, transforming this vibrant living organism into a toxic “dead zone.” Results suggest that increased nitrogen availability from natural and anthropogenic sources, including sewage, is supporting blooms of Sargassum and turning a critical nursery habitat into harmful algal blooms with catastrophic impacts on coastal ecosystems, economies, and human health. Globally, harmful algal blooms are related to increased nutrient pollution.

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Released: 21-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
Biodiversity devastation: Human-driven decline requires millions of years of recovery
Naturalis Biodiversity Center

A new study shows that the current rate of biodiversity decline in freshwater ecosystems outcompetes that at the end-Cretaceous extinction that killed the dinosaurs: damage now being done in decades to centuries may take millions of years to undo.

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Released: 21-May-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Telling up from down: How marine flatworms learn to sense gravity
Okayama University

All living organisms are equipped with sensory organs to detect changes in their surrounding environment.

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Released: 19-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
How a small fish coped with being isolated from the sea
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

The last ice age ended almost 12 000 years ago in Norway. The land rebounded slowly as the weight of the ice disappeared and the land uplift caused many bays to become narrower and form lakes.

Released: 19-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
FSU researchers uncover new role for strange organisms in ocean food web
Florida State University

Florida State University researchers have more insight into salps — a strange sea creature found in oceans around the world — and what their presence means for the health of a marine ecosystem.

Newswise: CSU Researchers Award $1.1 Million in Sea-Level Rise Research Funding to Assist California
Released: 18-May-2021 7:00 AM EDT
CSU Researchers Award $1.1 Million in Sea-Level Rise Research Funding to Assist California
California State University, Fullerton

Three research projects studying sea-level rise received a total of $1.1 million in funding from California State University Council on Ocean Affairs, Science and Technology (COAST) and California Sea Grant. The grant supports 11 researchers and 20 students from six CSU campuses.

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Released: 17-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
How plankton hold secrets to preventing pandemics
University of Colorado Boulder

Whether it's plankton exposed to parasites or people exposed to pathogens, a host's initial immune response plays an integral role in determining whether infection occurs and to what degree it spreads within a population, new University of Colorado Boulder research suggests.

Released: 17-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Save our oceans to protect our health - scientists call for global action plan
University of Exeter

Scientists have proposed the first steps towards a united global plan to save our oceans, for the sake of human health.

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Released: 17-May-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Two biodiversity refugia identified in the Eastern Bering Sea
Hokkaido University

Scientists from Hokkaido University have used species survey and climate data to identify two marine biodiversity refugia in the Eastern Bering Sea - regions where species richness, community stability and climate stability are high.

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Released: 14-May-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Evolutionary biologists discover mechanism that enables lizards to breathe underwater
University of Toronto

A team of evolutionary biologists from the University of Toronto has shown that Anolis lizards, or anoles, are able to breathe underwater with the aid of a bubble clinging to their snouts.

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Released: 14-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Which animals will survive climate change?
McGill University

Climate change is exacerbating problems like habitat loss and temperatures swings that have already pushed many animal species to the brink.

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Released: 13-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Can fisheries benefit from biodiversity and conserve it too?
Simon Fraser University

A new study, by researchers from Simon Fraser University and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, reveals the trade-offs of fish biodiversity--its costs and benefits to mixed-stock fisheries--and points to a potential way to harness the benefits while avoiding costs to fishery performance.

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Released: 13-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Largest-ever study of artificial insemination in sharks--and the occasional 'virgin birth'
Field Museum

It's a tough time to be a shark. Pollution, industrialized fishing, and climate change threaten marine life, and the populations of many top ocean predators have declined in recent years.

Newswise: Health Status of Vulnerable Gopher Tortoises Revealed in Southeastern Florida
Released: 12-May-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Health Status of Vulnerable Gopher Tortoises Revealed in Southeastern Florida
Florida Atlantic University

In previously unstudied gopher tortoise aggregations, researchers found that overall, 42.9 percent had circulating antibodies to an infectious bacterium that causes upper respiratory tract disease. Physical examination showed that 19.8 percent had clinical signs consistent with upper respiratory tract disease and 13.2 percent had some form of physical abnormality. None of the tortoises tested positive for Ranavirus or Herpesvirus, which represents important baseline data, since these viruses are thought to be emerging pathogens of other tortoise and turtle species.

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Released: 6-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Navigational tools: Sharks use Earth’s magnetic fields to find their way home
Florida State University

Each year, many shark species migrate hundreds of miles, traversing ocean waters to return to the same spot year after year. Now, Florida State University researchers have found that sharks likely use the Earth’s magnetic fields to help guide them on these long-distance journeys.

Newswise: Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Released: 5-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A massive collaborative research project covered in the journal Nature this week offers projections to the year 2100 of future sea-level rise from all sources of land ice, offering the most complete projections created to date.

Released: 5-May-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Urgent action needed to protect dolphins and porpoises from bycatch in European waters
Newcastle University

Marine scientists are calling on the EU to adopt a comprehensive plan to protect dolphins and porpoises from fisheries bycatch in European waters.

Newswise: Remote Learning Takes on New Meaning with the Launch of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Dive and Discover ™ Expedition 17
Released: 5-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Remote Learning Takes on New Meaning with the Launch of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Dive and Discover ™ Expedition 17
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole, Mass. (May 5, 2021) – Students and educators have grown accustomed to distance learning over the past year. But a new twist in remote learning kicked off on May 3 when Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) launched its seventeenth Dive and Discover expedition, an 18-day science research cruise out of Vigo, Spain to explore the ocean’s midwater, or twilight zone. Started in 2000, Dive and Discover is WHOI’s popular public outreach and educational platform, providing daily updates from some of the most remote locations on the planet. On this mission, virtual participants will follow along aboard the Spanish research vessel Sarmiento de Gamboa as scientists and engineers use some of the most advanced research tools available to study the twilight zone, which lies just beneath the sunlit surface waters and teems with life. The Sarmiento de Gamboa will be joining two others that are a part of the NASA-funded EXPORTS mission operating in the same location

Newswise: Breakthrough Study Shows No-take Marine Reserves Benefit Overfished Reefs
Released: 4-May-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Breakthrough Study Shows No-take Marine Reserves Benefit Overfished Reefs
Wildlife Conservation Society

A powerful, long-term study from WCS adds scientific backing for global calls for conserving 30 percent of the world’s ocean.

Released: 3-May-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Suitable Spawning Habitat Awaits Salmon
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists at PNNL and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation identify acres of spawning habitat in the Upper Columbia River.

Released: 3-May-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Human behavior must be factored into climate change analyses
Cornell University

A new Cornell University-led study examines how temperature affects fishing behavior and catches among inland fisher households in Cambodia, with important implications for understanding climate change.

Newswise: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research
with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole, Mass. (April 28, 2021) --Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) today announced the establishment of the Francis E. Fowler IV Center for Ocean and Climate to seek new knowledge and new solutions at the intersection of oceanography and climate science. A generous gift from Francis E. Fowler IV established the center and will enable it to immediately commence operations.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Study of marine noise highlights need to protect pristine Australian waters
Curtin University

New Curtin research has found urgent action is needed to ensure man-made underwater noise in Australian waters does not escalate to levels which could be harmful to marine animals, such as whales, and negatively impact our pristine oceans.

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Released: 28-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
FSU researchers develop tool to track marine litter polluting the ocean
Florida State University

In an effort to fight the millions of tons of marine litter floating in the ocean, Florida State University researchers have developed a new virtual tool to track this debris. Their work, which was published in Frontiers in Marine Science, will help provide answers to help monitor and deal with the problem of marine litter.

Newswise: Fishing in African Waters
Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Fishing in African Waters
University of Delaware

Industrial fleets from countries around the world have been increasingly fishing in African waters, but with climate change and increasing pollution threatening Africa’s fish stocks, there is a growing concern of the sustainability of these marine fisheries if they continue to be exploited by foreign countries.


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