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Newswise: Watch Dolphins Line Up to Self-Medicate Skin Ailments at Coral “Clinics”
Released: 21-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Watch Dolphins Line Up to Self-Medicate Skin Ailments at Coral “Clinics”
Cell Press

If a human comes down with a rash, they might go to the doctor and come away with some ointment to put on it. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins get skin conditions, too, but they come about their medication by queuing up nose-to-tail to rub themselves against corals.

Newswise: 'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
Released: 20-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
University of Exeter

Coral reef fish breed more successfully if motorboat noise is reduced, new research shows.

Newswise: Innovation Takes Off at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Released: 20-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Innovation Takes Off at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the world’s largest independent institution specifically focused on ocean science, engineering, and education, today announced the establishment of the George and Wendy David Center for Ocean Innovation, the latest in a series of new initiatives aimed at cementing WHOI’s position as a national leader in ocean innovation and laying the foundation for a future of scientific discoveries, breakthrough technologies, and unparalleled advances on land and at sea.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-finds-why-baby-leatherback-marine-turtles-can-t-see-the-sea
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Study Finds Why Baby Leatherback Marine Turtles Can’t ‘See the Sea’
Florida Atlantic University

For most sea turtles, the journey to find the ocean from their nests is pretty straightforward. However, leatherback hatchlings more often crawl around in circles trying to find the ocean. Circling delays their entry into the ocean, wastes energy, and places them at greater danger from natural predators. Under different moon phases: bright light during full moon and only starlight under new moon, researchers have a better understanding of why this circling behavior happens and why it is most commonly observed in leatherbacks.

Newswise: Seafloor animal cued to settle, transformed by a bacterial compound
Released: 18-May-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Seafloor animal cued to settle, transformed by a bacterial compound
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Most bottom-dwelling marine invertebrate animals, such as sponges, corals, worms and oysters, produce tiny larvae that swim in the ocean prior to attaching to the seafloor and transforming into juveniles.

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Embargo will expire: 23-May-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT

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Released: 18-May-2022 3:35 PM EDT
Bringing Order to the Chaos of Sea Level Projections
Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research

In their effort to provide decisionmakers with insight into the consequences of climate change, climate researchers at NIOZ, Deltares and UU are bringing order to the large amount of sea level projections, translating climate models to expected sea level rise.

Released: 18-May-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Scallops swim into illuminated fishing pots
University of Exeter

Scallops are drawn to illuminated fishing pots like moths to a flame, new research shows.

Newswise: Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
Released: 18-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
San Diego State University

A new study has found contaminants that were banned decades ago are still imperiling critically endangered California condors.

Newswise: U.S. Must Ramp up Ocean Conservation to Meet Global MPA Standards
17-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
U.S. Must Ramp up Ocean Conservation to Meet Global MPA Standards
Stony Brook University

A new analysis of marine protected areas (MPAs) reveals that many important ocean regions off mainland United States are significantly unprotected – with large portions of the coast having only five percent or less of its area conserved and a vast majority of the Mid-Atlantic coast unprotected.

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Embargo will expire: 25-May-2022 11:35 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT

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Released: 18-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
At-risk sea life in the Atlantic needs better protection from an increase in shipping
University of Portsmouth

New research from the University of Portsmouth has shown a dramatic increase in shipping in the North East Atlantic. Scientists now warn that more monitoring in the area is required to help protect sea life on the at-risk register.

Newswise: Deep Ocean Warming as Climate Changes
Released: 17-May-2022 11:30 AM EDT
Deep Ocean Warming as Climate Changes
University of Exeter

Much of the "excess heat" stored in the subtropical North Atlantic is in the deep ocean (below 700m), new research suggests.

Newswise: Komodo National Park is home to some of the world’s largest manta ray aggregations, new study shows
Released: 16-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Komodo National Park is home to some of the world’s largest manta ray aggregations, new study shows
PeerJ

Through a collaborative effort including the public, scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation and Murdoch University are reporting a large number of manta rays in the waters of Komodo National Park, an Indonesian UNESCO World Heritage Site, suggesting the area may hold the key to regional recovery of the threatened species.

Released: 13-May-2022 12:15 PM EDT
Sea turtle success stories along African east coast – but thousands still dying Peer-Reviewed Publication
University of Exeter

Conservation of sea turtles along much of Africa's east coast has made good progress in recent decades – but tens of thousands of turtles still die each year due to human activity, researchers say.

Released: 12-May-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Large-Scale Ocean Sanctuaries Could Protect Coral Reefs From Climate Change
Ohio State University

Earth’s oceans are home to some of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, but warming temperatures are causing many marine animals, including coral, to die out.

Newswise: WHOI scientists receive 2022 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards
Released: 12-May-2022 2:15 PM EDT
WHOI scientists receive 2022 Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Two Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientists have received prestigious Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards.

Released: 12-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Jellyfish’s Stinging Cells Hold Clues to Biodiversity
Cornell University

The cnidocytes – or stinging cells – that are characteristic of sea anemones, hydrae, corals and jellyfish, and make us careful of our feet while wading in the ocean, are also an excellent model for understanding the emergence of new cell types, according to new Cornell research.

Newswise: Changes in Cholesterol Production Lead to Tragic Octopus Death Spiral
Released: 12-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Changes in Cholesterol Production Lead to Tragic Octopus Death Spiral
University of Washington

Cholesterol metabolism is responsible for an unusual "death spiral" that some octopus mothers undergo after laying their eggs. The research, published May 12 in Current Biology, reveals that steroid hormones play critical roles in metabolism, behavior, life history and health across the animal kingdom.

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Embargo will expire: 23-May-2022 11:25 AM EDT Released to reporters: 11-May-2022 11:50 AM EDT

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Newswise: As Oceans Warm Will the Methane
Released: 9-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
As Oceans Warm Will the Methane "Kraken" Be Released?
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

To understand the stability of frozen hydrocarbon deposits on the seafloor, Ryan Hartman, associate professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Carolyn Koh of the Colorado School of Mines are launching an investigation into how mineral micropores keep this “fire ice” locked in a medium of sediment under specific pressures and temperatures.

Newswise: Critically endangered vaquita porpoise not doomed to extinction by inbreeding depression
Released: 6-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Critically endangered vaquita porpoise not doomed to extinction by inbreeding depression
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Unchecked gillnetting has pushed the world’s smallest porpoise to the brink of extinction: there are roughly 10 vaquitas remaining in the Gulf of California in Mexico.

Newswise: FAU Marine Science Trailblazer Receives Lifetime Achievement Award
Released: 5-May-2022 3:00 PM EDT
FAU Marine Science Trailblazer Receives Lifetime Achievement Award
Florida Atlantic University

Shirley Pomponi, Ph.D., an ocean explorer, aquanaut and marine biotechnologist, will receive the Society for In Vitro Biology’s (SIVB) highest award – the 2022 “Lifetime Achievement Award.” She has made pioneering, scientific advances and contributions to marine invertebrate biotechnology, biological oceanography and national marine policy.

Newswise: These Stunning 3D Models of Coral Reefs Are a Crucial Research Tool
Released: 5-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
These Stunning 3D Models of Coral Reefs Are a Crucial Research Tool
University at Buffalo

Martínez Quintana has created stunning 3D digital models that visualize the surface of coral reefs in painstaking detail. The artful re-creations aren’t just beautiful: They’re also filled with data on the distribution of young corals, known as recruits, that scientists are analyzing.

Newswise: Squid and octopus genome studies reveal how cephalopods’ unique traits evolved
Released: 4-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Squid and octopus genome studies reveal how cephalopods’ unique traits evolved
Marine Biological Laboratory

Squid, octopus, and cuttlefish – even to scientists who study them – are wonderfully weird creatures.

Newswise: Scientists, Students Set Deepwater Coring Record for Atlantic Ocean
Released: 3-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Scientists, Students Set Deepwater Coring Record for Atlantic Ocean
University of Rhode Island

A URI-led expedition to the Puerto Rico Trench took what researchers believe to be the deepest water core samples ever taken in the Atlantic. They’re also the deepest water cores taken anywhere in the oceans since 1962.

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Species of Salamander From Gulf Coastal Plains Hotspot
Released: 3-May-2022 9:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Species of Salamander From Gulf Coastal Plains Hotspot
George Washington University

A team of researchers led by R. Alexander Pyron, the Robert F. Griggs Associate Professor of Biology at the George Washington University, has discovered a new species of swamp-dwelling dusky salamander from the Gulf Coastal Plain of southeastern Mississippi and southwestern Alabama.

Newswise: Research discovers new bacteria that stick to plastic in the deep sea to travel around the ocean
Released: 29-Apr-2022 2:35 PM EDT
Research discovers new bacteria that stick to plastic in the deep sea to travel around the ocean
Newcastle University

Newcastle University scientists have found new types of plastic loving bacteria that stick to plastic in the deep sea that may enable them to ‘hitchhike’ across the ocean.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Global warming accelerates the water cycle, with relevant climatic consequences
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM) - CSIC

Researchers at the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC) in Barcelona have found that global warming is accelerating the water cycle, which could have significant consequences on the global climate system, according to an article published recently in the journal Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Dolphin Bycatch From Fishing Practices Unsustainable, Study Finds
28-Apr-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Dolphin Bycatch From Fishing Practices Unsustainable, Study Finds
University of Bristol

An international team of researchers have developed a method to assess sustainable levels of human-caused wildlife mortality, which when applied to a trawl fishery shows that dolphin capture is not sustainable.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Rutgers Researcher Aims to Protect and Regenerate Corals Through Coral Genomics with $500K NSF Grant and Award-Winning Video
Rutgers University's Office for Research

A Rutgers researcher will use genomics, genetics, and cell biology to identify and understand the corals’ response to heat stress conditions and to pinpoint master regulatory genes involved in coral bleaching due to global warming and climate change. The researcher and his team will use a novel gene-editing tool as a resource to knock down some gene functions with the goal of boosting the corals’ abilities to survive.

Newswise: Large Bodies Helped Extinct Marine Reptiles with Long Necks Swim, New Study Finds
27-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Large Bodies Helped Extinct Marine Reptiles with Long Necks Swim, New Study Finds
University of Bristol

Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered that body size is more important than body shape in determining the energy economy of swimming for aquatic animals.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Climate resilient microalgae could help restore coral reefs
Uppsala University

Coral species exhibit different temperature tolerances.

Released: 26-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Louisiana Gov. Edwards welcomes participants to Gulf of Mexico Conference (GOMCON)
Gulf of Mexico Alliance

More than 800 coastal scientists, managers, and professionals from federal and state agencies, academia, non-profits and industry have come together this week in Baton Rouge to network, collaborate and discuss coastal research and management in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the first-ever in-person Gulf of Mexico Conference (#GOMCON). Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards welcomed guests to the state Tuesday, during the opening plenary.

Newswise: Pathogens can hitch a ride on plastic to reach the sea
Released: 26-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Pathogens can hitch a ride on plastic to reach the sea
University of California, Davis

Microplastics are a pathway for pathogens on land to reach the ocean, with likely consequences for human and wildlife health, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

Released: 22-Apr-2022 4:35 PM EDT
Protected areas can be the beating heart of nature recovery in the UK, but they must be more than lines on a map
British Ecological Society

A new report launched today (22 April) by the British Ecological Society (BES) says that the UK government’s commitment to protect 30% of land and sea by 2030 offers the opportunity to revitalise the contribution of protected areas to nature recovery.

Newswise: Marine mollusc shells reveal how prehistoric humans adapted to intense climate change
Released: 22-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Marine mollusc shells reveal how prehistoric humans adapted to intense climate change
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Current global climatic warming is having, and will continue to have, widespread consequences for human history, in the same way that environmental fluctuations had significant consequences for human populations in the past.

Newswise: Freshwater habitats are fragile pockets of exceptional biodiversity
Released: 22-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Freshwater habitats are fragile pockets of exceptional biodiversity
University of Arizona

While much research has focused on the striking differences in biodiversity between tropical and temperate regions, another, equally dramatic, pattern has gone largely unstudied: the differences in species richness among Earth's three major habitat types – land, oceans and freshwater.

Newswise: Fluid Flow Stimulates Chemosynthesis in a Greek Salad of Hydrothermal Microbes
Released: 22-Apr-2022 9:40 AM EDT
Fluid Flow Stimulates Chemosynthesis in a Greek Salad of Hydrothermal Microbes
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new study uses an innovative approach to examine the bay’s shallow-water hydrothermal system and the production of microbes there in situ and near natural conditions as a model to assess the importance of hydrothermal fluid circulation on chemosynthesis.

Released: 21-Apr-2022 5:35 PM EDT
Environmental DNA reveals secret reef inhabitants
ETH Zürich

Tropical coral reefs are colourful, beautiful – and rich in species.

Released: 21-Apr-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Coastal experts get chance to explore new Gulf-wide research tools and information
Gulf of Mexico Alliance

Over 800 coastal researchers and managers will get the chance to explore more than 25 regional tools on display April 26 at the Gulf of Mexico Conference (#GOMCON) in Baton Rouge, La. The Tools Café gives participants a unique opportunity to access some of the newest and best tools for coastal resilience, data management, and conservation while learning about these resources directly from developers who created each tool.

Newswise: Deepest sediment core collected in the Atlantic Ocean
Released: 21-Apr-2022 10:10 AM EDT
Deepest sediment core collected in the Atlantic Ocean
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A team of scientists, engineers, and ship’s crew on the research vessel Neil Armstrong operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) recently collected a 38-foot-long cylindrical sediment sample from the deepest part of the Puerto Rico Trench, nearly 5 miles below the surface.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Marine microbes swim towards their favorite food
University of Technology, Sydney

Although invisible to us, every teaspoon of seawater contains more than a million marine bacteria.

Newswise: Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award
Released: 20-Apr-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award
Florida Atlantic University

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., has received a $1,103,081 NSF CAREER grant for a project that will build fundamental knowledge on where and when large shell-crushing predators feed in order to ensure a sustainable future for shellfish species. Further, the work can provide guidance to shellfish restoration programs that are currently “flying blind” with respect to predation risk.

Newswise: Microplastics in the food chain
Released: 18-Apr-2022 1:00 PM EDT
Microplastics in the food chain
Flinders University

Plastic rubbish is everywhere and now broken-down microplastics have been found in variable concentrations in blue mussels and water within the intertidal zone at some of southern Australia’s most popular and more remote beaches.

Newswise: Urgent action required to protect world’s coral reefs from disappearing within three decades, warn experts
Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Urgent action required to protect world’s coral reefs from disappearing within three decades, warn experts
University of Leicester

An international team of environmental scientists have published a series of significant recommendations to protect, conserve and study the world’s coral reefs – the ‘canaries in the coal mine’ of climate change.

Newswise: Sunlight’s Healing Effects Help Imperiled Green Sea Turtles With Tumors
Released: 12-Apr-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Sunlight’s Healing Effects Help Imperiled Green Sea Turtles With Tumors
Florida Atlantic University

Helping green sea turtles suffering with large debilitating tumors may be a simple as sunlight. Turtles with fibropapillomatosis are treated at rehab facilities where the tumors are surgically removed. Many do not survive or the tumors regrow. Researchers compared vitamin D levels in green sea turtles with and without evident tumors to see if sunlight exposure would influence vitamin D levels and other health parameters. Turtles receiving treatment were housed in tanks exposed to higher or lower levels of sunlight. Results showed that turtles exposed to greater sunlight showed greater increases in plasma vitamin D and a more successful recovery. Turtles kept in the sun tanks also experienced less regrowth of tumors compared to those exposed to low UV light conditions.


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