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Article ID: 720325

Men Receiving Opioids After Vasectomy at High Risk for Persistent Opioid Use

Wolters Kluwer Health

Routine use of opioids after vasectomy doesn't improve pain control, but is associated with a substantial rate of persistent opioid use in the months after the procedure, reports a study in the October issue of The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The Journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
9-Oct-2019 10:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Oct-2019 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 720371

Dietary Supplement From Tomatoes Discovered to Boost Sperm Quality

University of Sheffield

New discovery could transform outlook for men with fertility problems

Released:
8-Oct-2019 10:55 AM EDT
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Newswise: Clues from DNA could help predict growth of prostate cancer

Article ID: 720324

Clues from DNA could help predict growth of prostate cancer

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions in the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom and Singapore, have identified 1,178 biomarkers in men’s genomes — the complete set of genetic material inherited from one’s parents — that predict how an individual person’s prostate cancer will grow. The finding suggests that predicting how a person’s cancer will evolve may lie in their inherited DNA.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 720310

Large, long-term study suggests link between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer

Tohoku University

Results from the first long-term cohort study of more than 36,000 Japanese men over decades suggest an association between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 720025

The Blue in the Pink: Busting Myths about Male Breast Cancer

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

As Breast Cancer Awareness Month kicks off this October, a UNLV public health professor is reminding people that men are also at risk. Statistics show that about 1 in 8 U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime, leading to it be seen primarily as a “woman’s disease.” But that view unintentionally creates a health disparity for men, who — with a lifetime risk of developing breast cancer sitting at about 1 in 883 — often face barriers to diagnosis and treatment due to a lack of awareness among the general public, policymakers, and health care professionals, says Marya Shegog, director of health programs at The Lincy Institute at UNLV.

Released:
2-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 719665

Trial reports randomized evidence high-dose radiation is effective for men whose prostate cancer has spread

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

A randomized clinical trial of targeted, high-dose radiation for men with oligometastatic prostate cancer has shown the treatment to be an effective and safe option for patients who wish to delay hormone-suppression therapy. The phase II trial found that radiation therapy can generate an immune system response not previously believed possible in this type of cancer. Findings were presented at the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Released:
26-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 719662

Long-term hormone therapy increases mortality risk for men with low PSA levels after prostate surgery

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

A secondary analysis of a recent clinical trial that changed the standard of care for men with recurring prostate cancer finds long-term hormone therapy does more harm than good for many men and calls for rethinking treatment guidelines based on a patient’s post-operative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Findings were presented at the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Released:
26-Sep-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Sep-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 719493

GW Cancer Center Researchers Find Potential Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancers with PTEN Mutation

George Washington University

PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene mutated in about 20% of prostate cancers, relies on another gene, ARID4B, to function. These findings were published by George Washington University Cancer Center researchers in Nature Communications.

Released:
23-Sep-2019 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 719457

New Prostate Cancer Biopsy Reduces Risk of Infection, Improves Accuracy

Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine is among the first centers to offer a new minimally invasive prostate cancer biopsy that minimizes the risk of infection and may increase the cancer detection rate. It's called the transperineal prostate biopsy.

Released:
23-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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