Feature Channels: Meteorology

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2-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Newer Solar Power Equipment Ages Better Than Older Units
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Utility-scale photovoltaics are the largest sector of the overall solar market within the U.S. and the fastest-growing form of renewable power generation, and this fleet of utility-scale photovoltaic projects is relatively young and hasn’t been operating long enough to establish a lengthy history of operational field service. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers assess the performance of 411 utility-scale photovoltaic projects built within the U.S. from 2007 through 2016.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:20 PM EDT
In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
San Diego State University

Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research from San Diego State University finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
FSU experts available to comment on geochemical effects of Saharan dust cloud
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: July 1, 2020 | 1:25 pm | SHARE: More dust from the Sahara Desert is forecast to come to the United States this week. The massive dust plume known as the Saharan Air Layer has a myriad of effects on air quality, fertilizing ecosystems and more.Florida State University has experts available to comment on some of the surprising features related to the meteorological phenomenon.

Newswise: Jefferson Project Makes Lake George Science Data Publicly Available Through New Digital Dashboard
Released: 16-Jun-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Jefferson Project Makes Lake George Science Data Publicly Available Through New Digital Dashboard
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The Jefferson Project at Lake George is making real-time water quality and weather data from its unprecedented scientific monitoring and research program available directly to the public through a new digital Data Dashboard at jeffersonproject.live.

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Released: 3-Jun-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Climate change could dramatically reduce future US snowstorms
Northern Illinois University

A new study led by Northern Illinois University scientists suggests American winters late this century could experience significant decreases in the frequency, intensity and size of snowstorms.

Newswise: Long term data show hurricanes are getting stronger
14-May-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Long term data show hurricanes are getting stronger
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In almost every region of the world where hurricanes form, their maximum sustained winds are getting stronger. That is according to a new study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Center for Environmental Information and University of WisconsinMadison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, who analyzed nearly 40 years of hurricane satellite imagery.

Released: 13-May-2020 3:15 PM EDT
'Hurricanes from scratch': FSU researchers find even small disturbances can trigger catastrophic storms
Florida State University

You’ve probably seen the satellite images that show a hurricane developing: thick white clouds clumping together, arms spinning around a central eye as it heads for the coast. After decades of research, meteorologists still have questions about how hurricanes develop.

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Released: 13-May-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
University of Reading

Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War may have changed rainfall patterns thousands of miles from the detonation sites, new research has revealed.

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Released: 11-May-2020 4:05 PM EDT
SwRI scientist modeled Mars climate to understand habitability
Southwest Research Institute

A Southwest Research Institute scientist modeled the atmosphere of Mars to help determine that salty pockets of water present on the Red Planet are likely not habitable by life as we know it on Earth.

Released: 4-May-2020 3:10 PM EDT
FSU hurricane experts available to provide analysis throughout the season
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: May 4, 2020 | 2:42 pm | SHARE: From prediction to insurance consideration to ecological aftermath, Florida State University experts are among the world leaders in the study of hurricanes and their impact on people, property and the environment. These experts are available to answer media questions and provide perspective for news stories throughout the 2020 hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through Nov.

Newswise: University of Bristol Joins World-Leading Alliance to Advance Weather and Climate Science
21-Apr-2020 2:25 PM EDT
University of Bristol Joins World-Leading Alliance to Advance Weather and Climate Science
University of Bristol

The University of Bristol is today joining forces with the Met Office, together with UCL, to expand and transform an alliance which will strengthen the UK as a world leader in predicting climate hazards and tackling their far-reaching impact.

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Released: 15-Apr-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Unusually clear skies drove record loss of Greenland ice in 2019
Earth Institute at Columbia University

Last year was one of the worst years on record for the Greenland ice sheet, which shrunk by hundreds of billions of tons. According to a study published today in The Cryosphere, that mind-boggling ice loss wasn't caused by warm temperatures alone; the new study identifies exceptional atmospheric circulation patterns that contributed in a major way to the ice sheet's rapid loss of mass.

Newswise: $8.3M award to WHOI extends observational record of critical climate research
Released: 18-Mar-2020 1:50 PM EDT
$8.3M award to WHOI extends observational record of critical climate research
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently awarded $8.2 million to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to extend the life of the Overturning in the Sub-polar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP) in a key part of Earth’s ocean-climate system. The award is part of a $15.5 million grant to four U.S. institutions that will help add four years to the record being assembled by the observatory.

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Released: 9-Mar-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Rain, more than wind, led to massive toppling of trees in Hurricane Maria, says study
Earth Institute at Columbia University

A new study says that hurricanes Irma and Maria combined in 2017 to knock down a quarter of the biomass contained in Puerto Rico's trees -- and that massive rainfall, more than wind, was a previously unsuspected key factor.

Newswise: What We Don't Know (about lakes) Could Hurt Us
2-Mar-2020 1:10 PM EST
What We Don't Know (about lakes) Could Hurt Us
University of Vermont

As the power of extreme weather events increase with climate change, a team of scientists warn that lakes around the world may dramatically change, threatening ecosystem health and water quality.

Newswise: Predicting persistent cold pool events
Released: 24-Feb-2020 5:30 PM EST
Predicting persistent cold pool events
Argonne National Laboratory

In a multi-institutional field campaign with NOAA and other laboratories, researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are working to better identify and forecast the occurrence of cold pool events.

Released: 17-Feb-2020 3:40 PM EST
Mediterranean rainfall immediately affected by greenhouse gas changes
Imperial College London

Mediterranean-type climates face immediate drops in rainfall when greenhouse gases rise, but this could be interrupted quickly if emissions are cut.

Newswise: Where the sky meets the sea: Exploring the sea-surface microlayer
Released: 7-Feb-2020 3:45 PM EST
Where the sky meets the sea: Exploring the sea-surface microlayer
Texas A&M University

The separation between sky and sea is only one millimeter at its thickest and, yet, this sea-surface microlayer plays a major role in global phenomena. Dr. Aarthi Sekaran is taking a deeper look into how flow instabilities in this microlayer affects weather patterns and prediction.

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Released: 4-Feb-2020 2:20 PM EST
Deep learning accurately forecasts heat waves, cold spells
Rice University

Rice University engineers have created a deep learning computer system that taught itself to accurately predict extreme weather events, like heat waves, up to five days in advance using minimal information about current weather conditions.

Newswise:Video Embedded uw-s-new-broadcast-meteorology-course-is-first-on-west-coast
VIDEO
Released: 30-Jan-2020 7:15 PM EST
UW's new broadcast meteorology course is first on West Coast
University of Washington

The University of Washington has long boasted one of the country’s top programs in atmospheric sciences. Now, the UW is also teaching undergraduates how to share that knowledge online and on TV as a broadcast meteorologist.

Newswise: UAlbany Atmospheric Scientist Leads $2 Million Project to Study Hurricane Intensity
Released: 30-Jan-2020 2:45 PM EST
UAlbany Atmospheric Scientist Leads $2 Million Project to Study Hurricane Intensity
University at Albany, State University of New York

Atmospheric scientist Brian Tang has been awarded $2.145 million from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to help forecasters better understand and predict the rapid intensification of hurricanes.

Newswise:Video Embedded sleet-freezing-rain-polar-vortex-veteran-meteorology-expert-can-explain-winter-weather-forecast-terms
VIDEO
Released: 24-Jan-2020 8:20 AM EST
Sleet? Freezing rain? Polar vortex? Veteran meteorology expert can explain winter weather forecast terms
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Paul Roebber is one of the leading forecasting experts in the United States and the world. He’s a leader in bringing new approaches to meteorology, and his research has changed how experts around the world forecast weather.

Newswise: NOAA Releases Extended Version of 20th Century Reanalysis Project
Released: 14-Jan-2020 4:25 PM EST
NOAA Releases Extended Version of 20th Century Reanalysis Project
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has released an updated version of the 20th Century Reanalysis Project - a high-resolution, four-dimensional reconstruction of the global climate that now estimates what the weather was every day back to 1806.

Released: 10-Jan-2020 6:05 AM EST
New study shows dominance of local air pollution sources in Delhi
University of Surrey

The University of Surrey has revealed results from a new, comprehensive study that suggests that activities such as construction and vehicle traffic contribute significantly to the Delhi National Capital Region's high concentrations of harmful air pollutants and gases.

Newswise: Investigating the Ocean’s Influence on Australia’s Drought
Released: 9-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST
Investigating the Ocean’s Influence on Australia’s Drought
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

To understand how the relentless heat, blazing wild fires, and bone-dry conditions have reached such extremes, scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are looking to the ocean.

Newswise: Tests Measure Solar Panel Performance Beyond Established Standards
Released: 2-Jan-2020 3:10 PM EST
Tests Measure Solar Panel Performance Beyond Established Standards
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In testing solar panels, the sun’s intensity, the spectral composition and the angle of light are important factors in understanding why certain panels are successful and others degrade more quickly. To address the knowledge gap in degradation mechanisms for various photovoltaic types, researchers performed tests over five years in which they collected weather data and panel performance information. The results are published in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy.

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Released: 27-Dec-2019 12:35 PM EST
Snowmageddon warnings in North America come from tropics more than Arctic stratosphere
University of Reading

Winter weather patterns in North America are dictated by changes to the polar vortex winds high in the atmosphere, but the most significant cold snaps are more likely influenced by the tropics, scientists have found.

Newswise: A fragile crust protects from dust
Released: 10-Dec-2019 4:05 PM EST
A fragile crust protects from dust
University of Utah

From June 2016 to August 2018, Perry traversed the playa by bike, researching how it contributes to dust in the Salt Lake Valley’s air. In a report prepared for the Utah Department of Natural Resources and Utah Division of Facilities Construction and Management, Perry details the current dust source regions on the playa and explains how declining lake levels, as well as damage to the playa, could make the problem worse.

Newswise: Study: Favorable Environments for Large Hail Increasing Across U.S.
Released: 9-Dec-2019 11:30 AM EST
Study: Favorable Environments for Large Hail Increasing Across U.S.
University at Albany, State University of New York

A group of atmospheric scientists have uncovered an environmental footprint that could help explain why the cost of hailstorm damage is rapidly increasing in the United States.

Newswise: Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models
Released: 12-Nov-2019 3:55 PM EST
Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models
Argonne National Laboratory

A team of environmental and computation scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are collaborating to use deep neural networks, a type of machine learning, to replace the parameterizations of certain physical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, an extremely comprehensive model that simulates the evolution of many aspects of the physical world around us.

Newswise: Bye-Bye, Beaches
Released: 30-Oct-2019 3:45 PM EDT
Bye-Bye, Beaches
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Those beaches, as we know them today at least, almost certainly will not last. By the end of the 21st century, more than $150 billion in property along our coast could be under water. That's because the level of the sea is rising at an alarming rate, putting these areas at risk for devastating floods.

Released: 17-Oct-2019 2:15 PM EDT
How Aerosols Affect Our Climate
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Using a massive NASA dataset, Yale researchers have created a framework that helps explain just how sensitive local temperatures are to aerosols

Newswise: Lightning 'Superbolts' Form Over Oceans From November to February
Released: 10-Sep-2019 3:20 PM EDT
Lightning 'Superbolts' Form Over Oceans From November to February
University of Washington

A study of superbolts, which release a thousand times more electrical energy in the low-frequency range than regular lightning bolts, finds they occur at very different times and places than regular lightning. Superbolts tend to strike over particular parts of the oceans, while regular lightning strikes over land.

Released: 8-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species
Augustana University, South Dakota

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during mate selection in the butterfly Papilio polytes,” found that males of the species noticed the activity levels of potential female mates, not their markings.

Newswise: UAH Space Hardware Club on the Hunt for Terrestrial Gamma Rays in Thunderstorms
Released: 8-Jul-2019 8:05 AM EDT
UAH Space Hardware Club on the Hunt for Terrestrial Gamma Rays in Thunderstorms
University of Alabama Huntsville

Student members of the Space Hardware Club at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are preparing to launch weather balloons into thunderstorms to try to directly observe the terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) storms generate.


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