Feature Channels: Nanotechnology

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Newswise: ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Released: 6-May-2021 11:55 AM EDT
ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Sergei Kalinin, a scientist and inventor at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America professional society.

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Released: 6-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Zero to hero: Overlooked material could help reduce our carbon footprint
Okayama University

It is now well known that carbon dioxide is the biggest contributor to climate change and originates primarily from burning of fossil fuels.

Newswise: Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Released: 4-May-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The images leave no one cold: giant vortices of floating plastic trash in the world's oceans with sometimes devastating consequences for their inhabitants – the sobering legacy of our modern lifestyle. Weathering and degradation processes produce countless tiny particles that can now be detected in virtually all ecosystems. But how dangerous are the smallest of them, so-called nanoplastics? Are they a ticking time bomb, as alarming media reports suggest? In the latest issue of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, a team from Empa and ETH Zurich examines the state of current knowledge – or lack thereof – and points out how these important questions should be addressed.

Newswise: Nanotechnology offers new hope for bowel cancer patients
Released: 3-May-2021 8:15 AM EDT
Nanotechnology offers new hope for bowel cancer patients
University of South Australia

Bowel cancer is the second deadliest cancer in the world, killing almost 900,000 people in 2020. New research from Indian and Australian scientists suggests that nanotechnology could provide a more effective treatment option than conventional therapy.

Newswise: Science Snapshots From Berkeley Lab
Released: 29-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Science Snapshots From Berkeley Lab
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Science Snapshots From Berkeley Lab – Water purification, infant-warming device, cuff-based heart disease monitor, ancient magnetic fields

Newswise: Heavy charge against water germs
Released: 29-Apr-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Heavy charge against water germs
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Removing pathogens from drinking water is especially difficult when the germs are too tiny to be caught by conventional filters. Researchers at Empa and Eawag are developing new materials and processes to free water from pathogenic microorganisms such as viruses.

Newswise: Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have found a way to turn X-ray fluorescence into an ultra-high position-sensitive probe to measure nanostructures in thin films. The fluorescence reveals the evolution of nanostructures in real time with nearly atomic-level resolution, something no other technique has achieved. This allows scientists to watch nanostructures in thin films evolve with unprecedented precision and design thin films for new applications.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Nature provides inspiration for breakthrough in self-regulating materials
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Scientists have long sought to invent materials that can respond to the external world in predictable, self-regulating ways.

Newswise: Synthesis Method Expands Material Possibilities
Released: 23-Apr-2021 8:40 AM EDT
Synthesis Method Expands Material Possibilities
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists are making inorganic and organic-inorganic materials with tunable properties for energy, microelectronics, and other applications.

Newswise: The International Halal Science and Technology Conference (IHSATEC) 2020-2021: 14th Halal Science Industry and Business (HASIB)
Released: 20-Apr-2021 8:55 AM EDT
The International Halal Science and Technology Conference (IHSATEC) 2020-2021: 14th Halal Science Industry and Business (HASIB)
Chulalongkorn University

The Halal Science Center, Chulalongkorn University, would like to invite all to join the virtual conference, International Halal Science and Technology Conference (IHSATEC) 2020-2021 and 14th Halal Science Industry and Business (HASIB), on June 1-2, 2021. The conference will be carried out via Zoom from 9.00 – 16.00 hrs. (GMT+7 Bangkok time zone). All participants are to submit articles for the oral or poster presentations for the academic session of Thailand’s Halal Assembly 2021 before May 1, 2021.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
DNA robots designed in minutes instead of days
Ohio State University

Researchers have developed a new tool that can design much more complex DNA robots and nanodevices than were ever possible before in a fraction of the time.

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Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Superbug killer: New nanotech destroys bacteria and fungal cells
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University

Researchers have developed a new superbug-destroying coating that could be used on wound dressings and implants to prevent and treat potentially deadly bacterial and fungal infections.

Newswise: FSU engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:05 AM EDT
FSU engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence
Florida State University

In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Florida State University researchers managed to visualize the vortex tubes in a quantum fluid, findings that could help researchers better understand turbulence in quantum fluids and beyond.

Newswise: Better solutions for making hydrogen may lie just at the surface
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Better solutions for making hydrogen may lie just at the surface
Argonne National Laboratory

A new study uncovers insight into a promising type of material for splitting water, perovskite oxides.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
nanoComposix completes ISO13485:2016 Certification for Quality Management System
nanoComposix

nanoComposix is proud to announce the successful expansion of its Quality Management System (QMS) to include ISO 13485:2016 certification.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Less than a nanometer thick, stronger and more versatile than steel
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University and the University of Florida report a breakthrough involving a material called borophane, a sheet of boron and hydrogen a mere two atoms in thickness.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips: Mighty Mo Material, Fueling Retooling, Goods on the Move, Doubling Concrete and Batteries Passport
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Mighty Mo material, fueling retooling, goods on the move, doubling concrete and batteries passport

2-Apr-2021 7:05 PM EDT
This hydrogen fuel machine could be the ultimate guide to self improvement
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Scientists at Berkeley have uncovered an extraordinary self-improving property that transforms an ordinary semiconductor into a highly efficient and stable artificial photosynthesis device

Newswise: Cervical Cancer Testing Tech Could Replace Pap Smears, Save Lives
24-Mar-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Cervical Cancer Testing Tech Could Replace Pap Smears, Save Lives
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Emerging technologies can screen for cervical cancer better than Pap smears and, if widely used, could save lives in areas where access to health care may be limited. In Biophysics Reviews, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital write advances in nanotechnology and computer learning are among the technologies helping develop HPV screening that take the guesswork out of the precancer tests. That could mean better screening in places that lack highly trained doctors and advanced laboratories.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EDT
New Data Libraries Open a New Chapter in Designing Compounds that Mimic Antibodies
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Researchers developed a new method to synthesize and screen libraries of peptoid nanostructures. This enables researchers to design structures that can target bacteria and other microorganisms that can cause disease. It is the first rapid method for synthesizing and discovering compounds that can act like antibodies.

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Released: 25-Mar-2021 4:20 PM EDT
How tiny machines become capable of learning
Universität Leipzig

Microswimmers are artificial, self-propelled, microscopic particles.

Newswise: New class of versatile, high-performance quantum dots primed for medical imaging, quantum computing
Released: 25-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EDT
New class of versatile, high-performance quantum dots primed for medical imaging, quantum computing
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new class of quantum dots deliver a stable stream of single, spectrally tunable infrared photons under ambient conditions and at room temperature, unlike other single photon emitters.

Newswise:Video Embedded revealing-nano-big-bang-scientists-observe-the-first-milliseconds-of-crystal-formation
VIDEO
Released: 25-Mar-2021 8:35 AM EDT
Revealing Nano Big Bang – Scientists Observe the First Milliseconds of Crystal Formation
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

At Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry, scientists recruited a world-leading microscope to capture atomic-resolution, high-speed images of gold atoms self-organizing, falling apart, and then reorganizing many times before settling into a stable, ordered crystal.

Newswise: Shining a healing light on the brain
Released: 24-Mar-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Shining a healing light on the brain
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists report a novel noninvasive treatment for brain disorders based on breakthroughs in both optics and genetics. It involves stimulation of neurons by means of radioluminescent nanoparticles injected into the brain and exposed to X-rays.

Newswise: Fighting Cancer with DNA Origami
Released: 24-Mar-2021 9:55 AM EDT
Fighting Cancer with DNA Origami
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have devised a new way to build nanomaterials that can maintain their structural integrity and functionality in ways relevant to drug delivery. The team developed a class of molecular coatings compatible with biological environments. They used these coating to stabilize wireframed DNA origami cages that can carry an anticancer drug with a slower release of the medicine over time than possible with noncoated counterparts.

Newswise: Copper Foam as a Highly Efficient, Durable Filter for Reusable Masks and Air Cleaners
19-Mar-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Copper Foam as a Highly Efficient, Durable Filter for Reusable Masks and Air Cleaners
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Nano Letters have transformed copper nanowires into metal foams that could be used in facemasks and air filtration systems. The foams filter efficiently, decontaminate easily for reuse and are recyclable.

Newswise:Video Embedded building-tough-3d-nanomaterials-with-dna
VIDEO
18-Mar-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Building Tough 3D Nanomaterials with DNA
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia Engineering researchers, working with Brookhaven National Laboratory, report today that they have built designed nanoparticle-based 3D materials that can withstand a vacuum, high temperatures, high pressure, and high radiation. This new fabrication process results in robust and fully engineered nanoscale frameworks that not only can accommodate a variety of functional nanoparticle types but also can be quickly processed with conventional nanofabrication methods.

Newswise: Artificial neuron device could shrink energy use and size of neural network hardware
16-Mar-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Artificial neuron device could shrink energy use and size of neural network hardware
University of California San Diego

Neural network training could one day require less computing power and hardware, thanks to a new nanodevice that can run neural network computations using 100 to 1000 times less energy and area than existing CMOS-based hardware.

Released: 18-Mar-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Technion Launches Nanosatellites Into Outer Space
American Technion Society

In a first, three Israeli satellites will be launched simultaneously on March 20. The Adelis-SAMSON project from the Technion involves three autonomous nanosatellites that will fly in formation and monitor Earth from space.

Newswise: Chula Engineering Cures Salty Tap Water with NanoTech
Released: 18-Mar-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Chula Engineering Cures Salty Tap Water with NanoTech
Chulalongkorn University

During the dry season this year, Bangkok residents have faced the saltiest tap water problem in 20 years as a result of global warming and seawater rise. Chulalongkorn engineers predict the problem to persist until May and have proposed solutions with desalination technology.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Nanotech scientists create world’s smallest origami bird
Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have created micron-sized shape memory actuators that enable atomically thin two-dimensional materials to fold themselves into 3D configurations. All they require is a quick jolt of voltage. And once the material is bent, it holds its shape – even after the voltage is removed.

Newswise: Catching Electrons in Action in an Antiferromagnetic Nanowire
Released: 16-Mar-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Catching Electrons in Action in an Antiferromagnetic Nanowire
Michigan Technological University

The electron is one of the fundamental particles in nature we read about in school. Its behavior holds clues to new ways to store digital data. A new study explores alternative materials to improve capacity and shrink the size of digital data storage technologies. Specifically, the Michigan Tech team found that chromium-doped nanowires with a germanium core and silicon shell can be an antiferromagnetic semiconductor.

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Released: 12-Mar-2021 8:30 AM EST
‘Smart Bandage’ detects, could prevent infections
University of Rhode Island

URI chemical engineering professor embeds nanosensors in microfibers to create ‘smart bandage’

Newswise:Video Embedded fast-tracking-clinical-trials-vaccine-delivery-and-personal-protective-equipment-through-engineering-live-virtual-event-for-march-11-3pm-et
VIDEO
Released: 12-Mar-2021 7:20 AM EST
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Fast-tracking clinical trials, vaccine delivery, and personal protective equipment through engineering: Live virtual event for March 11, 3PM ET with ASME
Newswise

Fast-tracking clinical trials, vaccine delivery, and personal protective equipment through engineering: Live virtual event for March 11, 3PM ET

Newswise:Video Embedded uci-led-team-creates-new-ultralightweight-crush-resistant-tensegrity-metamaterials
VIDEO
Released: 11-Mar-2021 12:45 PM EST
UCI-led team creates new ultralightweight, crush-resistant tensegrity metamaterials
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., March 11, 2021 – Catastrophic collapse of materials and structures is the inevitable consequence of a chain reaction of locally confined damage – from solid ceramics that snap after the development of a small crack to metal space trusses that give way after the warping of a single strut. In a study published this week in Advanced Materials, engineers at the University of California, Irvine and the Georgia Institute of Technology describe the creation of a new class of mechanical metamaterials that delocalize deformations to prevent failure.

Newswise: Twistoptics—A New Way to Control Optical Nonlinearity
Released: 4-Mar-2021 1:50 PM EST
Twistoptics—A New Way to Control Optical Nonlinearity
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia Engineering researchers report that they developed a new, efficient way to modulate and enhance an important type of nonlinear optical process: optical second harmonic generation—where two input photons are combined in the material to produce one photon with twice the energy—from hexagonal boron nitride through micromechanical rotation and multilayer stacking. Their work is the first to exploit the dynamically tunable symmetry of 2D materials for nonlinear optical applications.

Newswise: A COSMIC Approach to Nanoscale Science
Released: 3-Mar-2021 8:25 AM EST
A COSMIC Approach to Nanoscale Science
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

COSMIC, a multipurpose X-ray instrument at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, has made headway in the scientific community since its launch less than 2 years ago, with groundbreaking contributions in fields ranging from batteries to biominerals.

Newswise: Scientists improve understanding of plasma source for synthesis of nanomaterial for microchips and numerous products
Released: 1-Mar-2021 3:25 PM EST
Scientists improve understanding of plasma source for synthesis of nanomaterial for microchips and numerous products
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Researchers have developed an insight that could facilitate production of microscopic carbon nanotubes, structures thousands of times thinner than a human hair used in everything from microchips to sporting goods to pharmaceutical products.

Newswise: Scientists Use Lipid Nanoparticles to Precisely Target Gene Editing to the Liver
24-Feb-2021 5:05 PM EST
Scientists Use Lipid Nanoparticles to Precisely Target Gene Editing to the Liver
Tufts University

Scientists developed a highly efficient, targeted method for delivering gene editing machinery to specific tissues and organs, demonstrating the treatment of high cholesterol by targeting genes in the liver of mice, reducing cholesterol for over 3 months (and potentially more) with one treatment

Released: 1-Mar-2021 8:40 AM EST
Researchers watch anti-cancer drug release from DNA nanostructures in real time
Aalto University

A team of researchers from Finland and Germany have found a way to study the endonuclease-driven digestion of drug-loaded DNA nanostructures in real time. As the team investigated the binding of anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) to the DNA structures in great detail, they discovered that the majority of previous studies have vastly overestimated the Dox loading capacity of DNA origami.

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Released: 26-Feb-2021 12:25 PM EST
Chip simplifies COVID-19 testing, delivers results on a phone
Rice University

COVID-19 can be diagnosed in 55 minutes or less with the help of programmed magnetic nanobeads and a diagnostic tool that plugs into an off-the-shelf cell phone, according to Rice University engineers.

Newswise:Video Embedded on-the-line-watching-nanoparticles-get-in-shape
VIDEO
Released: 25-Feb-2021 10:00 AM EST
On the Line: Watching Nanoparticles Get in Shape
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Berkeley Lab scientists have captured real-time, high-resolution videos of liquid structures taking shape as nanoparticles form a solid-like layer at the interface between oil and water. Their findings could help advance all-liquid robotics for targeted cancer drug delivery and other applications.

Newswise: Taking new steps with artificial platelets
Released: 17-Feb-2021 3:25 PM EST
Taking new steps with artificial platelets
Case Western Reserve University

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a $2.1 million, four-year research grant to Anirban Sen Gupta at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and collaborators at the University of Michigan and University of North Carolina, to advance the design of artificial platelets that can promote and stabilize clots to stop bleeding.

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Released: 9-Feb-2021 2:40 PM EST
The invisible killer lurking in our consumer products
University of Eastern Finland

Our consumer products, such as food, cosmetics and clothes, might be filled with nanomaterials - unbeknownst to us.

Newswise: Biomaterials Could Mean Better Vaccines, Virus-Fighting Surfaces
8-Feb-2021 11:50 AM EST
Biomaterials Could Mean Better Vaccines, Virus-Fighting Surfaces
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from the Indian Institute of Science describe possibilities being explored by scientists, combining biomaterials and nanotechnology, to make vaccines more effective and build surfaces that could fight and kill viruses on their own.

Released: 5-Feb-2021 2:15 PM EST
Signs of burnout can be detected in sweat
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

We've all felt stressed at some point, whether in our personal or professional lives or in response to exceptional circumstances like the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Released: 4-Feb-2021 4:05 PM EST
SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Bielefeld University

Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope.

Newswise: Imaging technique provides link to innovative products
Released: 4-Feb-2021 2:45 PM EST
Imaging technique provides link to innovative products
University of Georgia

A study led by University of Georgia researchers announces the successful use of a new nanoimaging technique that will allow researchers to test and identify two-dimensional materials.

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Released: 1-Feb-2021 4:40 PM EST
Batteries that can be assembled in ambient air
POHANG UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (POSTECH)

The honor of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to those who developed lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.


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