Curated News: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

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Released: 17-Nov-2021 2:25 PM EST
New model translates heart research findings from animals to humans
UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health scientists developed a new tool to translate cardiac studies from animal models to humans. The tool will help in better understanding arrhythmia and other heart conditions and support the search for effective cardiac therapies.

Released: 10-Nov-2021 2:20 PM EST
Study: Recommended approach for preventing blood clots after stent placement may not be as beneficial as once thought
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A new study suggests that because of improvements in stent technology and changes in the types of patients receiving stents, the risks of DAPT may now outweigh the benefits for the average patient.

Released: 3-Nov-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Popular heart failure drug no better than older drug in sickest patients
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that a widely used heart failure drug named sacubitril/valsartan is no better than valsartan alone in patients with severe heart failure. The study also provides evidence that the treatment with valsartan may be slightly safer for patients with advanced heart failure.

Released: 28-Sep-2021 5:40 PM EDT
New finding offers promise in researching depression together with obesity 
University of Illinois Chicago

Is problem-solving therapy effective in treating individuals who have both depression and obesity? Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have identified an important step toward discovering how and why therapies and treatments work. 

Released: 28-Sep-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Cleveland Clinic Study Suggests Steroid Nasal Sprays May Help Improve Outcomes in Severe COVID-19 Disease
Cleveland Clinic

A recent Cleveland Clinic study found that patients who regularly use steroid nasal sprays are less likely to develop severe COVID-19-related disease, including a 20 to 25% lower risk of hospitalization, ICU admission and mortality. The study was published in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

Newswise: Sanford Burnham Prebys awarded $13.5 million by NIH to investigate the pathogenesis and treatment of sepsis
Released: 23-Sep-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Sanford Burnham Prebys awarded $13.5 million by NIH to investigate the pathogenesis and treatment of sepsis
Sanford Burnham Prebys

Sanford Burnham Prebys professor Jamey Marth, Ph.D., has been awarded $13.5 million from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to continue his team’s work on sepsis, a condition that occurs when infectious and pathogenic organisms enter the bloodstream. This five-year award is a continuation of a multi-institution initiative, now totaling $27 million, that Marth began in 2016 with the goal of identifying the molecular basis of sepsis to achieve more effective treatments.

Newswise: Doctoral Student Receives National Institutes of Health Fellowship to Assess the Physical Fitness of Firefighters
Released: 22-Sep-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Doctoral Student Receives National Institutes of Health Fellowship to Assess the Physical Fitness of Firefighters
Rutgers School of Public Health

Rutgers School of Public Health doctoral student, Nimit Shah, has received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (F31HL160196) to study the predictors and barriers of physical fitness among volunteer firefighters.

Newswise: New NIH research study to investigate psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk among urban African American adults
Released: 20-Sep-2021 4:45 PM EDT
New NIH research study to investigate psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk among urban African American adults
Wayne State University Division of Research

The Biopsychosocial Health lab from Wayne State University has been awarded $3,590,488 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct a project titled “Stress and Cardiovascular Risk Among Urban African American adults: A Multilevel, Mixed Methods Approach.”

Newswise: Find Mothers’ Diabetes May Induce Premature Aging of Neural Tissue in Early Development of Fetuses, Leading to Birth Defects
Released: 9-Sep-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Find Mothers’ Diabetes May Induce Premature Aging of Neural Tissue in Early Development of Fetuses, Leading to Birth Defects
University of Maryland School of Medicine

About 300,000 to 400,000 fetuses per year from mothers with diabetes develop neural tube defects—when the tissue that eventually forms the brain and spinal cord fails to form properly—which can lead to miscarriage or profound disability.

Released: 1-Sep-2021 6:55 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Test to Predict Which Patients with Rare Blood Disease Will Respond to Only FDA-Approved Treatment, and Identify Alternative Therapy
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

New research has uncovered a precision medicine test using blood proteins to identify a novel patient subgroup of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD), a rare blood disorder, who are more likely to respond to siltuximab, the only FDA approved treatment for the disease.

Released: 25-Aug-2021 5:40 PM EDT
Diverse DNA signatures linked to heart disease
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Risk for heart disease does not look the same on the genetic level for different population groups, report an international team of researchers this month in the journal JAMA Cardiology. The study, led by Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, begins to outline gene activity patterns that could serve as early warning indicators for cardiovascular disease.

Released: 25-Aug-2021 9:15 AM EDT
Study shows certain efforts to recruit Black adults into cardiovascular disease clinical trials fall short
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers systematically reviewed federally funded cardiovascular disease trials run between 2000 and 2019 to determine whether various recruitment strategies impacted the number of Black participants enrolled.

Released: 19-Aug-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Treating newly infected COVID-19 patients with plasma from COVID survivors demonstrates no significant benefit, study finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A NIH study co-led and designed by Michigan Medicine researchers found that using convalescent plasma to treat newly infected #COVID-19 patients demonstrated no significant benefit. The trial was stopped in February 2021 due to lack of efficacy based on planned interim analysis

Released: 19-Aug-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Short hospitalizations hit hard for COVID patients
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Study hints at long-term health and financial impacts of even short hospitalizations for COVID-19.

Newswise: Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan
Released: 4-Aug-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos
University of California San Diego Health

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-calcium-precisely-directs-blood-flow-in-the-brain
VIDEO
19-Jul-2021 7:00 AM EDT
How Calcium Precisely Directs Blood Flow in the Brain
University of Maryland School of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Vermont researchers have shown how the brain communicates to blood vessels when in need of energy, and how these blood vessels respond by relaxing or constricting to direct blood flow to specific brain regions.

Newswise: New NIH Grant Supports Ongoing UTSW Investigation of Debilitating Complications of Blood Clots in Teens
Released: 23-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
New NIH Grant Supports Ongoing UTSW Investigation of Debilitating Complications of Blood Clots in Teens
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 23, 2021 – UT Southwestern will lead a multicenter investigation into why children and young adults experience decreased physical activity and shortness of breath after experiencing blood clots, thanks to a four-year $2.97 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

15-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
New Cleveland Clinic Research Identifies Link Between Gut Microbes and Stroke
Cleveland Clinic

New findings from Cleveland Clinic researchers show for the first time that the gut microbiome impacts stroke severity and functional impairment following stroke. The results, published in Cell Host & Microbe, lay the groundwork for potential new interventions to help treat or prevent stroke. The research was led by Weifei Zhu, Ph.D., and Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute.

Newswise: Stress from 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Associated with Significant Increase in Cardiac Events
Released: 20-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Stress from 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Associated with Significant Increase in Cardiac Events
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A new study in the Journal of the American Heart Association is the first to show that exposure to a stressful political election is strongly associated with an increase in potentially life-threatening cardiac events.

Released: 19-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
UB pharmacy researcher aims to develop real-time algorithm to lower hospital readmission rates
University at Buffalo

To lower hospital readmission rates for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), University at Buffalo pharmacy researcher David Jacobs has received a $962,000 award from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop a real-time readmission risk prediction algorithm.

10-May-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Genetic Variants Responsible for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have revealed how variants of a gene responsible for packing and condensing genetic material present a novel cause for certain neurodevelopmental disorders.

Released: 10-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Older adults are having abdominal surgery less frequently — but it depends on the surgery and the hospital
University of Chicago Medical Center

Contrary to popular belief, a new study from the University of Chicago Medicine found the frequency of abdominal surgery in older adults is decreasing, especially among adults over the age of 85.

Newswise: Researchers identify potential combination therapy for aggressive lung cancer
Released: 4-May-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Researchers identify potential combination therapy for aggressive lung cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The combination approach uses immune checkpoint inhibitors with ATRA, a safe medication that is widely used to treat leukemia.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 8:30 AM EDT
A new treatment that might keep COVID-19 patients off the ventilator
Ohio State University

A new treatment is among the first known to reduce the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by the flu in animals, according to a new study.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Anemia Discovery Points to More Effective Treatment Approaches
University of Virginia Health System

A combination of inexpensive oral medications may be able to treat fatigue-inducing anemias caused by chronic diseases and inflammation, a new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Newswise: Norovirus Clusters are Resistant to Environmental Stresses and UV Disinfection, New Study Finds
13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Norovirus Clusters are Resistant to Environmental Stresses and UV Disinfection, New Study Finds
George Washington University

Clusters of a virus known to cause stomach flu are resistant to detergent and ultraviolet disinfection, according to new research co-led by Danmeng Shuai, Ph.D., an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the George Washington University and Nihal Altan-Bonnet, Ph.D., a senior investigator and the head of the Laboratory of Host-Pathogen Dynamics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a series of experiments that began with amoebas — single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around — Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment.

16-Mar-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Genetic testing proves beneficial in prescribing effective blood thinners
Mayo Clinic

A new research paper funded in part by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) shows a clear advantage of genetic testing in helping health care providers choose the appropriate anti-platelet drug. Testing helps determine if a patient carries genetic variants in CYP2C19 that cause loss of its function. These variants interfere with the body's ability to metabolize and activate clopidogrel, an anti-platelet medication.

Newswise: Black Women More Likely To Gain Weight Than White Women After Menopause
Released: 15-Mar-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Black Women More Likely To Gain Weight Than White Women After Menopause
Rush University Medical Center

In a study published published in the medical journal PLOS ONE, researchers from Rush Institute for Health Aging find that racial disparities play a role in weight gain in older women.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 9:40 AM EST
Electricity could help speed wound healing, new study shows
Ohio State University

Electric stimulation may be able to help blood vessels carry white blood cells and oxygen to wounds, speeding healing, a new study suggests.

Newswise: Immune cell implicated in development of lung disease following viral infection
Released: 9-Mar-2021 12:25 PM EST
Immune cell implicated in development of lung disease following viral infection
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have implicated a type of immune cell in the development of chronic lung disease that sometimes is triggered following a respiratory viral infection. The evidence suggests that activation of this immune cell serves as an early switch that, when activated, drives progressive lung diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Newswise: Diversity Among Study Participants Credited with Identifying Gene Linked to Asthma
Released: 25-Feb-2021 7:30 PM EST
Diversity Among Study Participants Credited with Identifying Gene Linked to Asthma
Henry Ford Health System

Researchers at Henry Ford Health System, as part of a national asthma collaborative, have identified a gene variant associated with childhood asthma that underscores the importance of including diverse patient populations in research studies. The study is published in the print version of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Released: 24-Feb-2021 11:45 AM EST
Losing Obamacare protections during pandemic could increase health disparities
Oregon Health & Science University

If Affordable Care Act protections for pre-existing condition coverage are no longer available, the coronavirus pandemic would leave many Americans - a disproportionate number of whom are people of color - without health insurance, a new Oregon Health & Science University study indicates.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Mechanism By Which Exercise Strengthens Bones And Immunity
23-Feb-2021 11:30 AM EST
Researchers Identify Mechanism By Which Exercise Strengthens Bones And Immunity
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Scientists at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified the specialized environment, known as a niche, in the bone marrow where new bone and immune cells are produced. The study, published in Nature, also shows that movement-induced stimulation is required for the maintenance of this niche, as well as the bone and immune-forming cells that it contains. Together, these findings identify a new way that exercise strengthens bones and immune function.

Released: 23-Feb-2021 4:35 PM EST
You’ve Got to Move It, Move It
University of California San Diego Health

Research from Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at UC San Diego suggests that light-intensity physical activity, including shopping or a casual walk, may protect against mobility disability in older women.

Newswise: New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice
Released: 23-Feb-2021 2:30 PM EST
New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has uncovered a previously unknown role for exosomes in inflammatory respiratory diseases. The study has implications for finding new therapies. Exosomes are tiny compartments released from cells that carry different types of cargo, including inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can drive lung disease.

Released: 11-Feb-2021 2:05 PM EST
Move quickly to relax
Wayne State University Division of Research

A team of Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers led by Charles Chung, Ph.D., assistant professor of physiology, recently received a $1,894,271 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to address the critical need for new drug targets and diagnostic indexes for diastolic dysfunction using novel biomechanical tests that ultimately can be translated into clinical practice.

Released: 11-Feb-2021 12:10 PM EST
Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Brain Health Decades Later
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Having health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your 20s may make you more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills and even the brain’s ability to properly regulate its blood flow, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

Newswise: Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Released: 12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics to compare the rate of cardiovascular-related deaths before and after the onset of the pandemic in the United States, relative to the same periods in the prior year.

Newswise: Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers
1-Dec-2020 11:20 AM EST
Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems. When implanted into mice with failing livers, the lab-grown replacement livers extended life.

3-Dec-2020 8:10 AM EST
New updates to federal guidelines revamp asthma management
University of Chicago Medical Center

The National Institutes of Health today announced 19 recommendations in six key areas of asthma diagnosis, management and treatment.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Brain Cells that Help Drive Bodily Reaction to Fear, Anxiety
Released: 23-Nov-2020 12:15 PM EST
Scientists Identify Brain Cells that Help Drive Bodily Reaction to Fear, Anxiety
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This research helps illuminate the neural roots of emotions, and points to the possibility that a population of arousal-related neurons might be a target of future treatments for anxiety disorders and other illnesses involving abnormal arousal responses.

Newswise: All Weight Loss Isn’t Equal For Reducing Heart Failure Risk
Released: 9-Nov-2020 4:00 PM EST
All Weight Loss Isn’t Equal For Reducing Heart Failure Risk
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Nov. 9, 2020 – Reducing the level of body fat and waist size are linked to a lower risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes, a study led by UT Southwestern researchers indicates. The findings, reported today in Circulation, suggest that all weight loss isn’t equal when it comes to mitigating the risk of heart disease.

9-Nov-2020 9:55 AM EST
Hydroxychloroquine Does Not Help Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19: Study
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Findings from a national study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) “do not support” the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

Newswise: Study Documents Racial Differences In U.S. Hospice Use And End-Of-Life Care Preferences
Released: 28-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Study Documents Racial Differences In U.S. Hospice Use And End-Of-Life Care Preferences
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment, such as mechanical ventilation, gastronomy tube insertion, hemodialysis, CPR and multiple emergency room visits in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services.

Newswise: Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A team of researchers from the Rogel Cancer Center received an $11.2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study how to use the microbiome to limit complications of stem cell transplants for blood cancers and other diseases.

Released: 13-Oct-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Rensselaer, GE Research, Cleerly, and Cornell Partner With NIH To Improve Cardiac CT Diagnosis
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

With the support of a $3.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, an academic-industrial collaboration between General Electric Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Cleerly, and Weill Cornell Medicine will develop cutting-edge techniques for removing the appearance of blurry images — known as blooming artifacts — from cardiac CT scans to improve the accuracy of cardiac diagnosis and prevent patients from having to undergo costly and invasive procedures.

Newswise: Blocking Immune System Pathway May Stop COVID-19 Infection, Prevent Severe Organ Damage
Released: 8-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Blocking Immune System Pathway May Stop COVID-19 Infection, Prevent Severe Organ Damage
Johns Hopkins Medicine

While the world waits eagerly for a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infections from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers also are focusing on better understanding how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the body in the search for other means of stopping its devastating impact. The key to one possibility — blocking a protein that enables the virus to turn the immune system against healthy cells — has been identified in a recent study by a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.


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