Curated News: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

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Newswise: Study suggests lymphoma drug acalabrutinib might offer a potential therapeutic approach for severe COVID-19 infection
Released: 13-Jul-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Study suggests lymphoma drug acalabrutinib might offer a potential therapeutic approach for severe COVID-19 infection
Hackensack Meridian Health

The mechanisms of action of acalabrutinib led to the hypothesis it might be effective in reducing the massive inflammatory response seen severe forms of COVID19. Indeed, it did provide clinical benefit in a small group of patients by reducing their inflammatory parameters and improving their oxygenation.

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Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Jul-2020 1:15 PM EDT

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Released: 10-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Fast-Spreading Mutation Helps Common Flu Subtype Escape Immune Response
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Strains of a common subtype of influenza virus, H3N2, have almost universally acquired a mutation that effectively blocks antibodies from binding to a key viral protein, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Researcher Receives NIH Award to Study Immune Responses of Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases in the Setting of COVID-19 Infection
Mount Sinai Health System

The study will aim to understand whether systemic medications and biologics, such as dupilumab—a monoclonal antibody that binds to an inflammatory molecule, IL-4 receptor alfa, and inhibits the inflammatory response that leads to rashes and itching from atopic dermatitis/eczema—may have a positive or negative impact on COVID-19 responses in patients who have the disease.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Critical New Allergy Pathway
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified the sequence of molecular events by which tiny, tick-like creatures called house dust mites trigger asthma and allergic rhinitis.

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Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:25 AM EDT
Experts identify steps to expand and improve antibody tests in COVID-19 response
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

More than 300 scientists and clinicians from the federal government, industry and academia published a report of their conclusions and recommendations on COVID-19 serology studies online in Immunity.

Newswise: LJI Scientists Investigate a Powerful Protein Behind Antibody Development
17-Jun-2020 4:35 PM EDT
LJI Scientists Investigate a Powerful Protein Behind Antibody Development
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered a potential new way to better fight a range of infectious diseases, cancers and even autoimmune diseases. The new study, published recently in Nature Immunology, shows how a protein works as a “master regulator” in the immune system.

Newswise: Remdesivir trial at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center shows promise, adds second therapy to protocol
Released: 28-May-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Remdesivir trial at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center shows promise, adds second therapy to protocol
Penn State College of Medicine

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center has enrolled its first patients in the continuation of a clinical trial using the investigational antiviral drug remdesivir for treatment of COVID-19.

Newswise: Researchers Receive NIH Funds for Adjuvant Research to Boost Coronavirus Vaccines
Released: 26-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Receive NIH Funds for Adjuvant Research to Boost Coronavirus Vaccines
Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, to screen and evaluate certain molecules known as adjuvants that may improve the ability of coronavirus vaccines to stimulate the immune system and generate appropriate responses necessary to protect the general population against the virus.

Released: 13-May-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Study confirms cats can become infected with and may transmit COVID-19 to other cats
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In a study published today (May 13, 2020) in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists in the U.S. and Japan report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats.

Newswise: NIH Statement on World Asthma Day 2020
4-May-2020 5:10 PM EDT
NIH Statement on World Asthma Day 2020
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Today on World Asthma Day, the National Institutes of Health stands with patients, families, advocates, researchers, and health care professionals to raise awareness about this common chronic respiratory disease, the people it affects, and the research that improves its prevention and treatment.

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Released: 4-May-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Study to determine incidence of novel coronavirus infection in US children begins
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

A study to help determine the rate of novel coronavirus infection in children and their family members in the United States has begun enrolling participants.

Newswise: Drug prevents cognitive impairment in mice after radiation treatment for brain tumors
Released: 15-Apr-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Drug prevents cognitive impairment in mice after radiation treatment for brain tumors
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers identify a possible new drug that could help prevent cognitive decline in people who undergo radiation therapy for brain tumors.

Newswise: Tulane University awarded $10.3 million to test therapeutics, vaccines for novel coronavirus
Released: 6-Apr-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Tulane University awarded $10.3 million to test therapeutics, vaccines for novel coronavirus
Tulane University

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Tulane National Primate Research Center a contract of up to $10.3 million to evaluate vaccines and treatments to combat coronavirus disease 2019.

Released: 3-Apr-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Trial for Potential Coronavirus Treatment is Underway at Montefiore and Einstein
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine has joined a clinical trial to evaluate the experimental drug remdesivir to treat people who are hospitalized with severe COVID-19 infection.

Released: 25-Mar-2020 4:25 PM EDT
COVID-19 Immunotherapy Collab at UGA with Biotech Firm CEL-SCI to Fight Coronavirus
Newswise

CEL-SCI’s immunotherapy candidate aims to treat patients at highest risk of dying from COVID-19. LEAPS immunotherapy has been used in collaboration with the National Institutes for Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) against another respiratory virus, H1N1, involved in the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic. Those successful studies demonstrated that LEAPS peptides, given after virus infection has occurred, reduced morbidity and mortality in mice infected with H1N1.

Released: 24-Mar-2020 2:50 PM EDT
UC San Diego Health Launches Clinical Trial to Assess Antiviral Drug for COVID-19
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at four University of California Health medical centers have begun recruiting participants for a Phase II clinical trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of treating adult patients with COVID-19 with remdesivir, a drug that has shown promising activity against multiple viruses.

Released: 23-Mar-2020 9:30 AM EDT
CEL-SCI to Develop LEAPS COVID-19 Immunotherapy in Collaboration with University of Georgia Center for Vaccines and Immunology
Cel-Sci Corp

Initial studies with COVID-19 coronavirus aim to replicate prior successful preclinical experiments of LEAPS against H1N1pandemic flu in mice conducted with National Institutes for Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Newswise: Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies
Released: 16-Mar-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have found — in newborn mice — that a component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing life-threatening sepsis.

Newswise: Mimicking Cancer’s Evasive Tactics, Microparticles Show Promise Against Transplant Rejection
8-Mar-2020 9:00 PM EDT
Mimicking Cancer’s Evasive Tactics, Microparticles Show Promise Against Transplant Rejection
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Inspired by a tactic cancer cells use to evade the immune system, University of Pittsburgh researchers have engineered tiny particles that can trick the body into accepting transplanted tissue as its own, while leaving the immune system intact.

Newswise: LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus
Released: 11-Mar-2020 6:15 PM EDT
LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Publishing in the March 16, 2020, online issue of Host, Cell and Microbe, a team of researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology, in collaboration with researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute, provides the first analysis of potential targets for effective immune responses against the novel coronavirus. The researchers used existing data from known coronaviruses to predict which parts of SARS-CoV-2 are capable of activating the human immune system.

6-Mar-2020 8:30 AM EST
New Study on Covid-19 Estimates 5.1 Days for Incubation Period
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An analysis of publicly available data on infections from the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, that causes the respiratory illness COVID-19 yielded an estimate of 5.1 days for the median disease incubation period, according to a new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Newswise: Bifunctional nanobodies proven effective at protecting against botulinum neurotoxins including Botox
Released: 27-Feb-2020 8:35 AM EST
Bifunctional nanobodies proven effective at protecting against botulinum neurotoxins including Botox
University of California, Irvine

New study reveals potential for developing novel antibody-based antitoxins against botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), including the most commonly used, yet most toxic one, Botox.

Newswise:Video Embedded revving-up-immune-system-may-help-treat-eczema
VIDEO
Released: 26-Feb-2020 12:15 PM EST
Revving up immune system may help treat eczema
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying eczema, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that boosting the number of natural killer cells in the blood is a possible treatment strategy for the skin condition and also may help with related health problems, such as asthma.

Newswise: New Tool for an Old Disease: Use of PET and CT Scans May Help Develop Shorter TB Treatment
Released: 24-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
New Tool for an Old Disease: Use of PET and CT Scans May Help Develop Shorter TB Treatment
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Experts believe that tuberculosis, or TB, has been a scourge for humans for some 15,000 years, with the first medical documentation of the disease coming out of India around 1000 B.C.E. Today, the World Health Organization reports that TB is still the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious agent, responsible for some 1.5 million fatalities annually. Primary treatment for TB for the past 50 years has remained unchanged and still requires patients to take multiple drugs daily for at least six months. Successful treatment with these anti-TB drugs — taken orally or injected into the bloodstream — depends on the medications “finding their way” into pockets of TB bacteria buried deep within the lungs.

Released: 11-Feb-2020 11:10 AM EST
Young Men Unaware of Risks of HPV Infection and Need for HPV Vaccination
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Young sexual minority men — including those who are gay, bisexual, queer or straight-identified men who have sex with men — do not fully understand their risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) due to a lack of information from health care providers, according to Rutgers researchers.

Newswise: A Viral Gold Rush
Released: 31-Jan-2020 10:45 AM EST
A Viral Gold Rush
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Researchers developed open-source software that can classify viruses in ways that previous tools could not.

Newswise: Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial
Released: 28-Jan-2020 4:55 PM EST
Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for treatment, and a shortened lifespan – had to rely on bone marrow donations for a chance at remission.

21-Jan-2020 11:10 AM EST
Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Overcoming HIV latency – activating HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant – is a needed step toward a cure. Scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics – a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare – showed it’s possible to drive HIV out of latency in two animal models.

Released: 8-Jan-2020 4:10 PM EST
Penn Study Paves Way for New Vaccines to Protect Infants Against Infections
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother’s antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclinical study were published online today in Science Translational Medicine.

Released: 7-Jan-2020 5:45 PM EST
Intervention for patients hospitalized with HIV improved reengagement and outcomes of care
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Providing multidisciplinary team consults for HIV patients while they are hospitalized to help address social and medical barriers reduces future infection rates and boosts participation in follow-up care, results from a study on how to reengage patients show.

Newswise: Delivering TB Vaccine Intravenously Dramatically Improves Potency, Study Shows
30-Dec-2019 11:20 AM EST
Delivering TB Vaccine Intravenously Dramatically Improves Potency, Study Shows
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Worldwide, more people die from tuberculosis than any other infectious disease, even though the vast majority were vaccinated. The vaccine just isn’t that reliable. But a new Nature study finds that simply changing the way the vaccine is administered could dramatically boost its protective power.

Newswise: Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done
Released: 23-Dec-2019 1:55 PM EST
Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered a new way that the molecule RIPK1 leads to cell death in infected, damaged or unwanted cells showing that more than one mechanism can trigger the process. The findings appeared online today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Newswise: Influenza IMPRINT Cohort Study Receives Funding Boost
Released: 10-Dec-2019 7:30 AM EST
Influenza IMPRINT Cohort Study Receives Funding Boost
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

The Influenza IMPRINT Cohort study will explore the emerging idea that a person’s very first influenza virus exposure impacts the magnitude, durability and breadth of their immune response to all future flu exposures.

Newswise: Research at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source leads to new Ebola drug
Released: 9-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
Research at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source leads to new Ebola drug
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists using specialized beamlines at Argonne's Structural Biology Center (SBC), a facility for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source, derived insights that led to the discovery of a promising new drug for Ebola.

Newswise:Video Embedded more-than-a-watchdog
VIDEO
2-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
More Than a Watchdog
Harvard Medical School

Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body Nerves in the gut prevent Salmonella infection by shutting the cellular gates that allow bacteria to invade the intestine and spread beyond it As a second line of defense, gut neurons help avert Salmonella invasion by maintaining the levels of key protective microbes in the gut Findings reveal prominent role for nervous system in infection protection and regulation of immunity

Newswise: Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies
Released: 3-Dec-2019 11:55 AM EST
Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies
University of Illinois at Chicago

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers and colleagues report a new mechanism for detecting foreign material during early immune responses.

Released: 3-Oct-2019 1:10 PM EDT
New Test Assists Physicians With Quicker Treatment Decisions For Sepsis
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt

A new test to determine whether antibiotics will be effective against certain bacterial infections is helping physicians make faster and better prescription treatment choices.

Released: 30-Sep-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Mount Sinai to Lead Universal Flu Vaccine Design
Mount Sinai Health System

NIH contract award of up to $132 million will further ongoing efforts to develop a long-lasting vaccine

Newswise:Video Embedded duke-vaccine-institute-plays-integral-role-in-national-effort-to-improve-flu-shots
VIDEO
Released: 30-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Duke Vaccine Institute Plays Integral Role in National Effort to Improve Flu Shots
Duke Clinical Research Institute

As part of a massive national effort to improve and modernize flu shots, the Duke Human Vaccine Institute has received three research contracts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), with an initial award of approximately $29.6 million in first-year funding.

Released: 20-Sep-2019 2:05 PM EDT
UM School of Medicine’s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health Receives NIH Contract for Influenza Research
University of Maryland School of Medicine

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases research contract is one of the largest ever awarded to UMSOM and includes an initial award of approximately $2.5 million to conduct clinical testing of influenza vaccines. Total funding over seven years could be as much as $201 million if all options are exercised in the NIAID contract.

Released: 20-Sep-2019 11:00 AM EDT
UM School of Medicine’s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health Receives NIH Contract for Influenza Research
University of Maryland School of Medicine

The UM School of Medicine's Contract awarded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases could fund up to $201 Million in influenza research over seven years.

Newswise: Starting HIV Treatment in ERs May Be Key to Ending HIV Spread Worldwide
Released: 16-Sep-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Starting HIV Treatment in ERs May Be Key to Ending HIV Spread Worldwide
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. A report on the findings was published in August in EClinicalMedicine.


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