Curated News: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

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Released: 26-Jul-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Two Types of Blood Pressure Meds Prevent Heart Events Equally, but Side Effects Differ
American Heart Association (AHA)

People who are just beginning treatment for high blood pressure can benefit equally from two different classes of medicine - angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) - yet ARBs may be less likely to cause medication side effects, according to an analysis of real-world data published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

Newswise: ‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Released: 7-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing.

Released: 25-Jun-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Study to Assess Allergic Reactions to COVID Vaccines
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) is enrolling volunteers ages 12-69 to take part in an NIH funded study to assess reactions to the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines in highly allergic individuals.

Released: 25-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT
How Does Dengue Vaccines Fail to Protect Against Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC-Chapel Hill scientists investigated blood samples from children enrolled in a dengue vaccine trial to identify the specific kinds of antibody responses that correlate with protection against dengue virus disease.

Newswise: Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Scientists have a general idea of how viruses invade and spread in the body, but the precise mechanisms are actually not well understood, especially when it comes to Ebola virus. Olena Shtanko, Ph.D., a Staff Scientist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed), has received more than $1 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore different aspects of Ebola virus infection.

Newswise:Video Embedded what-makes-us-sneeze
VIDEO
14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.

Newswise: For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Released: 14-Jun-2021 5:15 PM EDT
For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they believe that, for the first time, there is evidence to show that three doses of vaccine increase antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — more than the standard two-dose regimen for people who have received solid organ transplants.

Newswise: College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center join clinical trial evaluating allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines
Released: 1-Jun-2021 9:40 AM EDT
College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center join clinical trial evaluating allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines
Penn State College of Medicine

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine are participating in a national clinical trial evaluating whether people who have previously experienced severe allergic reactions are at increased risk for an immediate, systemic allergic reaction to the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines.

Newswise: LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
Released: 27-May-2021 6:05 PM EDT
LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) is partnering with Synbal, Inc., a preclinical biotechnology company based in San Diego, CA, to develop multi-gene, humanized mouse models for COVID-19 research. The research at LJI will be led by Professor Sujan Shresta, Ph.D., a member of the Institute’s Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research.

Newswise: Alcohol problems severely undertreated
Released: 17-May-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Alcohol problems severely undertreated
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that although the vast majority of people with alcohol use disorder see their doctors regularly for a range of issues, fewer than one in 10 ever get treatment to help curb their drinking.

Newswise: New study finds low levels of a sugar metabolite associates with disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis
Released: 13-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
New study finds low levels of a sugar metabolite associates with disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis
University of California, Irvine

A new University of California, Irvine-led study finds low serum levels of the sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is associated with progressive disability and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS).

Released: 3-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Lurie Children’s Study to Use Soy Isoflavones in a Precision Medicine Approach to Prevent Wheezing and Asthmatic Inflammation in High Risk Infants
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Rajesh Kumar, MD, and Jacqueline Pongracic, MD, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago received $3 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a site-specific clinical trial on whether a soy supplement in infancy can prevent asthma in children with a high-risk genetic variation. This will be one of the earliest precision medicine approaches to asthma prevention.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 5:00 PM EDT
Texas A&M AgriLife Research investigating phages to fight bacterial infection
Texas A&M AgriLife

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health, NIH, has awarded $2.5 million in grants to support research on bacteriophage therapy, and Texas A&M AgriLife Research is among the grant recipients.

Newswise: UNC Researchers Receive $3.74 Million to Create Injectable Technology for Contraception, HIV Prevention
Released: 15-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
UNC Researchers Receive $3.74 Million to Create Injectable Technology for Contraception, HIV Prevention
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

The lab of Rahima Benhabbour, PhD, has received a $3.74 million grant over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The grant will fund the creation of an injectable that will provide long-acting protection for women against sexually transmitted pathogens and prevent pregnancy, but is also removable.

Released: 15-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Awarded Nearly $7 Million for First Year of Contract to Study Influenza Viruses
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine has been selected as one of five sites across the country to serve as a Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Response (CEIRR), with the goal of better understanding influenza viruses around the world along with learning about the viral strains that have the potential to cause pandemics. Penn Medicine has been awarded nearly $7 million in first-year funding.

Newswise: Norovirus Clusters are Resistant to Environmental Stresses and UV Disinfection, New Study Finds
13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Norovirus Clusters are Resistant to Environmental Stresses and UV Disinfection, New Study Finds
George Washington University

Clusters of a virus known to cause stomach flu are resistant to detergent and ultraviolet disinfection, according to new research co-led by Danmeng Shuai, Ph.D., an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the George Washington University and Nihal Altan-Bonnet, Ph.D., a senior investigator and the head of the Laboratory of Host-Pathogen Dynamics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Immune cell implicated in development of lung disease following viral infection
Released: 9-Mar-2021 12:25 PM EST
Immune cell implicated in development of lung disease following viral infection
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have implicated a type of immune cell in the development of chronic lung disease that sometimes is triggered following a respiratory viral infection. The evidence suggests that activation of this immune cell serves as an early switch that, when activated, drives progressive lung diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Released: 5-Mar-2021 9:25 AM EST
Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of Staph Bacteria May Be Spreading Between Pigs Raised in Factory Farms and People in North Carolina
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

DNA sequencing of bacteria found in pigs and humans in rural eastern North Carolina, an area with concentrated industrial-scale pig-farming, suggests that multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains are spreading between pigs, farmworkers, their families and community residents, and represents an emerging public health threat, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released: 2-Mar-2021 3:05 PM EST
Houston Methodist finds multiple cases of significant coronavirus mutations, including Brazil strain
Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist has sequenced more than 20,000 of Houston’s coronavirus genomes since the start of the pandemic and leads the SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing efforts in the U.S. In the most recent batches of genomes, the U.K., South Africa, Brazil, California and New York variants were detected.

Newswise: Diversity Among Study Participants Credited with Identifying Gene Linked to Asthma
Released: 25-Feb-2021 7:30 PM EST
Diversity Among Study Participants Credited with Identifying Gene Linked to Asthma
Henry Ford Health System

Researchers at Henry Ford Health System, as part of a national asthma collaborative, have identified a gene variant associated with childhood asthma that underscores the importance of including diverse patient populations in research studies. The study is published in the print version of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Newswise: Cone Snail Venom Shows Potential for Treating Severe Malaria
Released: 18-Feb-2021 8:30 AM EST
Cone Snail Venom Shows Potential for Treating Severe Malaria
Florida Atlantic University

Using venom from the Conus nux, a sea snail, a first-of-its-kind study suggests these conotoxins could potentially treat malaria. The study provides important leads toward the development of new and cost-effective anti-adhesion or blockade-therapy drugs aimed at counteracting the pathology of severe malaria. Similarly, mitigation of emerging diseases like COVID-19 also could benefit from conotoxins as potential inhibitors of protein-protein interactions as treatment. Venom peptides from cone snails has the potential to treat myriad diseases using blockage therapies.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-covid-19-infection-rates-high-in-pregnant-women
VIDEO
Released: 16-Feb-2021 12:40 PM EST
Study: COVID-19 infection rates high in pregnant women
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

The study also showed that the number of COVID-19 infections in pregnant patients from nearly all communities of color in Washington was high. There was a twofold to fourfold higher prevalence of pregnant patients with COVID-19 infections from communities of color than expected based on the race-ethnicity distribution of pregnant women in Washington in 2018.

Released: 12-Feb-2021 10:00 AM EST
ACTG Adds Four Promising New Therapies to ACTIV-2 Outpatient Treatment Study
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group has added rapid infusion, intramuscular injection, an inhalant, and an oral agent to its ACTIV-2 phase 2 and 3 evaluations of multiple investigational agents for treating early, symptomatic COVID-19 in a single trial for outpatient treatment.

Newswise: Cold sores: Discovery reveals how stress, illness and even sunburn trigger flareups
Released: 11-Feb-2021 8:05 AM EST
Cold sores: Discovery reveals how stress, illness and even sunburn trigger flareups
University of Virginia Health System

The finding could lead to new ways to prevent cold sores and herpes-related eye disease from reoccurring, the researchers report.

Released: 8-Feb-2021 1:15 PM EST
Single-Dose Nipah, Hendra Vaccine for Humans Effective 7 Days After Immunization
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

A vaccine for use against the deadly Nipah and Hendra viruses has demonstrated effectiveness in preclinical studies as early as 7 days following a single immunization, according to a new study, "A Single Dose Investigational Subunit Vaccine for Human Use against Nipah virus and Hendra virus," published in the journal, npj Vaccines, online February 8, 2021.

Newswise: New study to probe how diet and metabolism influence the immune system
Released: 3-Feb-2021 9:35 AM EST
New study to probe how diet and metabolism influence the immune system
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Feb. 3, 2021) — A pair of scientists from Van Andel Institute and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have been granted a three-year, $1.5 million Allen Distinguished Investigator award from The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of the Allen Institute, to better understand how diet and metabolism influence the immune system’s ability to fight off threats such as infections.

Released: 1-Feb-2021 3:05 PM EST
$1.2 million award moves Texas Biomed closer to groundbreaking on critical new building
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

A $1.2. million challenge grant from the Mabee Foundation brings Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) closer to its goal of $10 million to fund the construction of its Nonhuman Primate Animal Facility (NHP ALFA) on its campus. The Institute is more than halfway to its goal. This project will accommodate the critical need of the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) to provide innovative, contemporary accommodations and laboratory space for animals involved in research that aid in testing the safety and efficacy of new and improved diagnostics, therapies and vaccines at a larger scale.

Newswise: COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
26-Jan-2021 5:00 PM EST
COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
University of Washington School of Medicine

The study, which followed 240 pregnant women between March and June 2020, found that the COVID-19 mortality rate in the pregnant women was significantly higher when compared to the COVID-19 mortality rate in similarly aged individuals within Washington state.

Newswise: Recruiting Starts at University of Miami Health System for NIH Study of COVID-19 Immunity
Released: 25-Jan-2021 11:05 AM EST
Recruiting Starts at University of Miami Health System for NIH Study of COVID-19 Immunity
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The University of Miami Health System is one of five sites nationally and the only one in the Southeast U.S. chosen to participate in a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) study looking at people who have had COVID-19 or have had a COVID-19 vaccine to examine the durability and robustness of participants’ antibody and T-cell responses to the virus.

27-Dec-2020 3:00 PM EST
$3.9M project on self-deleting genes takes aim at mosquito-borne diseases
Texas A&M AgriLife

To control mosquito populations and prevent them from transmitting diseases such as malaria, many researchers are pursuing strategies in mosquito genetic engineering. A new Texas A&M AgriLife Research project aims to enable temporary “test runs” of proposed genetic changes in mosquitoes, after which the changes remove themselves from the mosquitoes’ genetic code.

Newswise:Video Embedded fauci-calls-on-scientists-to-help-rebuild-publics-trust-in-science
VIDEO
6-Dec-2020 10:00 AM EST
Fauci Calls on Scientists to Help Rebuild Publics’ Trust in Science
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Anthony Fauci, MD, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has received the 2020 American Society for Cell Biology Public Service Award.

Released: 30-Nov-2020 1:35 PM EST
NIH Re-Funds ACTG for the Next Seven Years
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest global HIV research network, has been re-funded for the next seven years by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and collaborating NIH Institutes.

Newswise: Dr. Anthony Fauci to Speak at UVA Medical Center Hour
Released: 17-Nov-2020 8:20 AM EST
Dr. Anthony Fauci to Speak at UVA Medical Center Hour
University of Virginia Health System

Anthony S. Fauci, MD, will discuss COVID-19 – including the latest on potential vaccines – in a free Zoom presentation at noon Nov. 18 during Medical Center Hour at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

Newswise: Keck Medicine of USC is enrolling individuals in a phase 3 clinical trial to test monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19
Released: 16-Nov-2020 8:05 AM EST
Keck Medicine of USC is enrolling individuals in a phase 3 clinical trial to test monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19
Keck Medicine of USC

Keck Medicine of USC is enrolling individuals in a phase 3 clinical trial to test monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19

Released: 13-Nov-2020 9:55 AM EST
New Saliva-Based Antibody Test for SARS-CoV-2 Highly Accurate in Initial Study
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new saliva-based test developed by a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has been found to accurately detect the presence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Released: 9-Nov-2020 3:15 PM EST
NIH Awards $2.9 Million Grant to Wake Forest Baptist Scientists to Develop Flu Vaccine for Newborns Using Animal Model
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Newborns and young infants are particularly susceptible to the flu and are six times more likely to die from the infection than older children. Currently there is no flu vaccine available for babies less than 6 months old.

Newswise: Light pollution may increase biting behavior at night in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
Released: 20-Oct-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Light pollution may increase biting behavior at night in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
University of Notre Dame

Artificial light abnormally increases mosquito biting behavior at night in a species that typically prefers to bite people during the day, according to research from the University of Notre Dame that was published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Newswise: First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
5-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT
First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
University of Wisconsin-Madison

At night in a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats. In a necropsy room near the Baltic Sea, researchers try to determine what killed a donkey, a Bennett’s tree-kangaroo and a capybara at a German zoo — all of them suffering from severe brain swelling. Neither team was aware of the other, yet they were both about to converge on a discovery that would forever link them — and help solve a long-enduring mystery.

Newswise: ‘Repliclones’ Fuel Perplexing Persistence of HIV in the Blood of Some Patients on Medication
1-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT
‘Repliclones’ Fuel Perplexing Persistence of HIV in the Blood of Some Patients on Medication
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

In a new study, infectious disease researchers show that HIV viremia isn’t always nonadherence to medication or resistance to the drugs. Instead, the patients are victims of what the scientists have dubbed “repliclones” – large clones of HIV-infected cells that produce infectious virus particles.

Newswise: A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
Released: 24-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

Newswise:Video Embedded beating-hiv-and-covid-19-may-depend-on-tweaking-vaccine-molecules
VIDEO
Released: 27-Aug-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Beating HIV and COVID-19 may depend on tweaking vaccine molecules
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new Immunity study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) show that one way to improve the body's immune response to vaccines is to factor in antigen valency. Valency refers to the number of antibody binding sites on an antigen.

Released: 21-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Long-acting, Injectable Drug Could Strengthen Efforts to Prevent, Treat HIV
University of Utah Health

Scientists have developed an injectable drug that blocks HIV from entering cells. They say the new drug potentially offers long-lasting protection from the infection with fewer side effects.

Newswise: Study Adds To Evidence That Odor-Sensing Cells In The Nose Are The Key Entry Point For Sars Cov-2
Released: 20-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study Adds To Evidence That Odor-Sensing Cells In The Nose Are The Key Entry Point For Sars Cov-2
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, experimenting with a small number of human cell samples, report that the “hook” of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs. These supporting cells are necessary for the function/development of odor-sensing cells. The findings, from a preliminary study of cells lining both the nose and trachea, could advance the search for the best target for topical or local antiviral drugs to treat COVID-19, and offers further clues into why people with the virus sometimes lose their sense of smell.

Released: 14-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Convalescent Plasma Associated with Reduced COVID-19 Mortality in 35,000-Plus Hospitalized Patients
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic and collaborators have published a preprint that identifies two main signals of efficacy that can inform future clinical trials on plasma therapy on COVID-19 patients. The data are extracted from the Mayo-led national Expanded Access Program (EAP) for convalescent plasma for the treatment of hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Newswise: Imitation May Be a Sincere Form of Treatment
Released: 5-Aug-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Imitation May Be a Sincere Form of Treatment
University of California San Diego Health

The National Institutes of Health will soon launch a phase II clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of potential new therapeutics for COVID-19, including the use of investigational synthetic monoclonal antibodies. Davey Smith of UC San Diego is the protocol chair and answers questions.

Newswise: Study: Enzyme Could Prove Effective in Treating Tumors and Inflammatory Diseases in Lung
Released: 4-Aug-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Study: Enzyme Could Prove Effective in Treating Tumors and Inflammatory Diseases in Lung
Henry Ford Health System

Findings from a research study, led by scientists at Henry Ford, suggest an enzyme could play an important role in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases in the airway.

Released: 28-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Higher BPA Levels Linked to More Asthma Symptoms in Children
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine.

Released: 27-Jul-2020 11:10 AM EDT
George Washington University to Conduct Clinical Trial for COVID-19 Experimental Vaccine
George Washington University

The George Washington University will participate in a clinical trial for an investigational COVID-19 vaccine.

Newswise: 237844_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens
University of California, Berkeley

Widespread use of pesticides and other agrochemicals can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

13-Jul-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Approximately A Third of Pediatricians Fully Follow Guidelines on Peanut Allergy Prevention in Infants
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study published in JAMA Network Open.


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