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22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
21-Jan-2020 11:10 AM EST

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Penn Study Paves Way for New Vaccines to Protect Infants Against Infections

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother’s antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclinical study were published online today in Science Translational Medicine.

Channels: Children's Health, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Vaccines, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 4:10 PM EST
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Intervention for patients hospitalized with HIV improved reengagement and outcomes of care

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Providing multidisciplinary team consults for HIV patients while they are hospitalized to help address social and medical barriers reduces future infection rates and boosts participation in follow-up care, results from a study on how to reengage patients show.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, Healthcare, Race and Ethnicity, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), All Journal News,

Released:
7-Jan-2020 5:45 PM EST
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Newswise: Delivering TB Vaccine Intravenously Dramatically Improves Potency, Study Shows
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

Delivering TB Vaccine Intravenously Dramatically Improves Potency, Study Shows

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Worldwide, more people die from tuberculosis than any other infectious disease, even though the vast majority were vaccinated. The vaccine just isn’t that reliable. But a new Nature study finds that simply changing the way the vaccine is administered could dramatically boost its protective power.

Channels: Grant Funded News, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Vaccines, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
30-Dec-2019 11:20 AM EST
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Newswise: Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done

Breaking the dogma: Key cell death regulator has more than one way to get the job done

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered a new way that the molecule RIPK1 leads to cell death in infected, damaged or unwanted cells showing that more than one mechanism can trigger the process. The findings appeared online today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Channels: Cancer, Cell Biology, Immunology, Pharmaceuticals, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Journal of Experimental Medicine, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Dec-2019 1:55 PM EST
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Newswise: Influenza IMPRINT Cohort Study Receives Funding Boost

Influenza IMPRINT Cohort Study Receives Funding Boost

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

The Influenza IMPRINT Cohort study will explore the emerging idea that a person’s very first influenza virus exposure impacts the magnitude, durability and breadth of their immune response to all future flu exposures.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome, Vaccines, Influenza, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),

Released:
10-Dec-2019 7:30 AM EST
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Newswise: Research at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source leads to new Ebola drug

Research at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source leads to new Ebola drug

Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists using specialized beamlines at Argonne's Structural Biology Center (SBC), a facility for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source, derived insights that led to the discovery of a promising new drug for Ebola.

Channels: All Journal News, Clinical Trials, DOE Science News, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, Vaccines, Ebola, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DOE Science News,

Released:
9-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST

More Than a Watchdog

Harvard Medical School

Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body Nerves in the gut prevent Salmonella infection by shutting the cellular gates that allow bacteria to invade the intestine and spread beyond it As a second line of defense, gut neurons help avert Salmonella invasion by maintaining the levels of key protective microbes in the gut Findings reveal prominent role for nervous system in infection protection and regulation of immunity

Channels: All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Cell (journal),

Released:
2-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
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Newswise: Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies

Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies

University of Illinois at Chicago

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers and colleagues report a new mechanism for detecting foreign material during early immune responses.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Chemistry, Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),

Released:
3-Dec-2019 11:55 AM EST
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