Curated News: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

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Released: 26-Jan-2023 4:15 PM EST
Small Study Shows Promise for Antimalarial Monoclonal Antibody to Prevent Malaria
University of Maryland School of Medicine

monoclonal antibody treatment was found to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in protecting against malaria in a small group of healthy volunteers who were exposed to malaria in a challenge study, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Newswise: Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $12 Million NIH Grant to Create a Center to Unravel Novel Causes of Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis
Released: 25-Jan-2023 4:10 PM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $12 Million NIH Grant to Create a Center to Unravel Novel Causes of Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have been awarded $12 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health to create a center to elucidate novel causes of, and contributing factors to, food allergies and atopic dermatitis. The Systems Biology of Early Atopy (SunBEAm) Analysis and Bioinformatics Center intends to develop a better understanding of allergy development. The center will apply systems biology to identify early-life markers of risk for food allergies and atopic dermatitis (also known as eczema), as well as biological pathways underlying these common conditions, through the profiling and analysis of longitudinal multi-omics data from a multi-center pre-birth cohort of 2,500 children.

Released: 24-Jan-2023 6:05 AM EST
A design of experiments approach to precision vaccine adjuvants
Washington University in St. Louis

Adjuvants are added to vaccines to improve protection, extend the duration of protection and reduce the dose or number of boosters required.

Newswise: Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:50 PM EST
Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

An international consortium co-led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center immunogeneticist Rubén Martínez-Barricarte, PhD, has discovered a new genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency and profound susceptibility to opportunistic infections including a life-threatening fungal pneumonia. The discovery, reported Jan. 20 in the journal Science Immunology, will help identify people who carry this in-born error of immunity (IEI).

Newswise: Multimodal Sequencing Achieves High-Quality Results from Small Volumes of Frozen Tumor Specimens
Released: 18-Jan-2023 4:50 PM EST
Multimodal Sequencing Achieves High-Quality Results from Small Volumes of Frozen Tumor Specimens
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia researchers invent a multimodal sequencing technique that achieves high-quality results from small volumes of frozen tumor specimens--the ability to study cancer tissues archived in biobanks should increase the number and variety of tumor samples available for scientific analysis and advance the discovery of biomarkers and drug targets.

Newswise: Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
Released: 17-Jan-2023 4:20 PM EST
Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows how ideal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 hit their marks. Now scientists are looking at how we might harness their power in new antibody therapeutics and even more effective COVID-19 vaccines.

   
Newswise: Study links specific outdoor air pollutants to asthma attacks in urban children
Released: 5-Jan-2023 4:00 PM EST
Study links specific outdoor air pollutants to asthma attacks in urban children
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Moderate levels of two outdoor air pollutants, ozone and fine particulate matter, are associated with non-viral asthma attacks in children and adolescents who live in low-income urban areas, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found.

Released: 4-Jan-2023 7:40 PM EST
Does COVID change the body’s response to other threats? Depends on your sex
Yale University

The long-term effects of infection on the immune system have long intrigued John Tsang, a Yale immunobiologist. After the body has faced down a pathogen, does the immune system return to the previous baseline? Or does a single infection change it in ways that alter how it will respond not only to a familiar virus but also to the next new viral or bacterial threat it faces?

Newswise: A Three-Dose Malaria Vaccine Shows Safety, Efficacy in West African Adults
Released: 4-Jan-2023 12:55 PM EST
A Three-Dose Malaria Vaccine Shows Safety, Efficacy in West African Adults
University of Maryland School of Medicine

A three-dose regimen of a whole-parasite vaccine against malaria – called Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) vaccine – demonstrated safety and efficacy when tested in adults living in Burkina Faso, West Africa, which has endemic malaria.

Newswise:Video Embedded lji-scientists-confirm-smallpox-vaccine-also-teaches-t-cells-to-fight-mpox
VIDEO
Released: 6-Dec-2022 8:30 PM EST
LJI scientists confirm smallpox vaccine also teaches T cells to fight mpox
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

"Vaccines such as JYNNEOS should be able to induce T cells that also recognize mpox and can provide protection from severe disease."

   
Newswise: Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Released: 6-Dec-2022 5:15 PM EST
Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Duke University

Biomedical and genetic engineers at Duke University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed a small fluorescent protein that emits and absorbs light that penetrates deep into biological tissue.

Newswise: Researchers developing treatment for drug-resistant fungus with $3M-plus grant from National Institutes of Health
Released: 30-Nov-2022 11:05 AM EST
Researchers developing treatment for drug-resistant fungus with $3M-plus grant from National Institutes of Health
Case Western Reserve University

With a new $3 million-plus grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Case Western Reserve University researchers are examining the next level of treatment for Candida auris (C.auris), a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes serious infection and, in some cases, death.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:20 AM EST
Holding Mycophenolate Mofetil for 10 Days or More May Improve COVID-19 Vaccine Response
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated that withholding mycophenolate mofetil for 10 days significantly increased antibody response after 2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, without a significant increase in flares.

Released: 1-Nov-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Monoclonal Antibody Prevents Malaria Infection in African Adults
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

One dose of an antibody drug safely protected healthy, non-pregnant adults from malaria infection during an intense six-month malaria season in Mali, Africa, a National Institutes of Health clinical trial has found.

Newswise: Experimental Monoclonal Antibodies Show Promise Against Epstein-Barr Virus
Released: 27-Oct-2022 6:40 PM EDT
Experimental Monoclonal Antibodies Show Promise Against Epstein-Barr Virus
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

A panel of investigational monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting different sites of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) blocked infection when tested in human cells in a laboratory setting.

Newswise: UC San Diego Joins National Trial to Test Drug for Treating MPOX
Released: 27-Oct-2022 12:00 PM EDT
UC San Diego Joins National Trial to Test Drug for Treating MPOX
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego will be one of multiple sites assessing the safety and efficacy of tecovirimat as a potential treatment for human monkeypox. Marketed as TPOXX, tecovirimat is an antiviral currently approved for treatment of human smallpox in adults and children caused by the variola virus.

Newswise: Initiation of Intercourse Alters Vaginal Immune Environment
Released: 26-Oct-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Initiation of Intercourse Alters Vaginal Immune Environment
University of Washington School of Medicine

UW Medicine researchers compared vaginal samples collected from 95 young women or adolescent study participants in Kenya before or after they began having sexual intercourse. They found a sharp increase in proteins that control the immune response, including IL-1β, IL-2, and CXCL8, during the first year after becoming sexually active.

Released: 20-Oct-2022 2:05 PM EDT
GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the GW MFA Recruiting Participants for Final Stage of the NIAID’s COVAIL Trial
George Washington University

The GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences is recruiting participants for the final stage of a clinical trial to evaluate two Omicron-specific vaccines. The study, known as the COVID-19 Variant Immunologic Landscape (COVAIL) trial, is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences has received funding support as an agreement under NIH contract number 75N91019D00024 to Leidos Biomedical Research in Frederick, Maryland.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Flu-Fighting Pathways and Genes Essential for Influenza A Immune Defense
Released: 5-Oct-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Researchers Identify Flu-Fighting Pathways and Genes Essential for Influenza A Immune Defense
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers have identified the gene TDRD7 as a key regulator against influenza A virus (IAV), which causes respiratory tract infections in 5 to 20 percent of the human population.

Newswise: Gut bacteria may contribute to susceptibility to HIV infection, UCLA-led research suggests
Released: 29-Sep-2022 8:05 PM EDT
Gut bacteria may contribute to susceptibility to HIV infection, UCLA-led research suggests
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

New UCLA-led research suggests certain gut bacteria -- including one that is essential for a healthy gut microbiome – differ between people who go on to acquire HIV infection compared to those who have not become infected. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal eBioMedicine, suggest that the gut microbiome could contribute to one’s risk for HIV infection, said study lead Dr.

Newswise: 220922_Felgner_1318-768x488.jpg
Released: 26-Sep-2022 11:05 AM EDT
UCI awarded $13.8 million federal contract to profile lipid nanoparticles
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 26, 2022 – The University of California, Irvine has been awarded a five-year, $13.8 million contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to conduct detailed immune profiling of lipid nanoparticles to increase understanding of their role in enhancing vaccine protective responses and in causing side effects.

Released: 25-Aug-2022 2:10 PM EDT
NIH experts review monkeypox challenges
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Lessons learned from the public health responses to the HIV and COVID-19 pandemics should help guide the response to the current outbreak of monkeypox, National Institutes of Health experts write in an editorial published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 25-Aug-2022 11:15 AM EDT
Using mRNA, Tufts Researchers Teach Muscle Cells to Produce Antibodies
Tufts University

With COVID-19 vaccines pushing down costs of mRNA technology, a study in mice from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine experts sparks hope for next generation treatments and potential applications to developing world and veterinary diseases

Newswise: New Method Detects Gut Microbes That Activate Immune Cells
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
New Method Detects Gut Microbes That Activate Immune Cells
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai investigators have developed a method to help identify which human gut microbes are most likely to contribute to a slew of inflammatory diseases like obesity, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and some neurological diseases.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Monoclonal antibody prevents malaria in US adults, NIH trial shows
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

One injection of a candidate monoclonal antibody (mAb) known as L9LS was found to be safe and highly protective in U.S. adults exposed to the malaria parasite, according to results from a National Institutes of Health Phase 1 clinical trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise: Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
14-Jul-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report they have probed the atomic structure of proteins to add to evidence that the wobbles, shakes and quivers of proteins play a critical role in their ability to function. The findings of the research may help scientists design new drugs that can modify or disrupt the intricate “dances” of proteins to alter their functions.

Newswise: Scientists Discover Key to Hepatitis A Virus Replication, Show Drug Effectiveness
30-Jun-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Scientists Discover Key to Hepatitis A Virus Replication, Show Drug Effectiveness
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC School of Medicine scientists discovered that hepatitis A viral replication requires specific interactions between a human protein and a group of enzymes, and they used a molecule to stop replication at this key interactive step, making it impossible for the virus to infect liver cells.

Newswise: COVID-19 Fattens Up Our Body’s Cells to Fuel Its Viral Takeover
Released: 28-Jun-2022 12:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Fattens Up Our Body’s Cells to Fuel Its Viral Takeover
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

The virus that causes COVID-19 takes over the body’s fat-processing system and boosts cellular triglycerides as it causes disease.

Newswise: UTSW Scientists Identify Protein Key to Inhibiting Flu Virus
Released: 20-Jun-2022 1:15 PM EDT
UTSW Scientists Identify Protein Key to Inhibiting Flu Virus
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A collaborative study from UT Southwestern scientists has identified a new function for a protein called TAO2 that appears to be key to inhibiting replication of the influenza virus, which sickens millions of individuals worldwide each year and kills hundreds of thousands. The findings were published in PNAS.

Newswise: LJI scientists publish first head-to-head comparison of four COVID-19 vaccines
Released: 31-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
LJI scientists publish first head-to-head comparison of four COVID-19 vaccines
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

"Just understanding the immune responses to these vaccines will help us integrate what is successful into vaccine designs going forward.”

Newswise: Academia, Pharma Team up to Discover New Drugs in Fight Against SARS-CoV-2, Viruses of the Future
Released: 31-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Academia, Pharma Team up to Discover New Drugs in Fight Against SARS-CoV-2, Viruses of the Future
Hackensack Meridian Health

Consortium of Hackensack Meridian CDI, Rockefeller University, Columbia University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Rutgers University, Merck, Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc., and Aligos Therapeutics to combine expertise to ‘accelerate’ new breakthroughs

Released: 14-Apr-2022 9:00 AM EDT
NIH Grant Awarded to Study HIV Drug-Resistant Genetic Mutations Across Africa
Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM)’s Institute of Human Virology (IHV) researchers received funding from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for $2.7 million to study genetic changes in two genes from the HIV-1 virus that may make it resistant to antiretroviral therapy.

Newswise: NIAID Director Anthony Fauci to Speak at Uniformed Services University Packard Lecture
Released: 7-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
NIAID Director Anthony Fauci to Speak at Uniformed Services University Packard Lecture
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and White House Chief Medical Advisor, will present “COVID-19: Progress and Priorities in the 3rd Year of a Historic Pandemic” when he delivers the 2022 David Packard Award Lecture at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Monday, April 11, 2022.

Newswise:Video Embedded promising-antibody-cocktail-takes-on-ebola-virus-and-its-deadly-cousin
VIDEO
15-Mar-2022 2:10 PM EDT
Promising antibody cocktail takes on Ebola virus—and its deadly cousin
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The team's latest study, published in Cell, shows that two clever human antibodies can target two ebolavirus species at once: Ebola virus and Sudan virus. These two species are responsible for the biggest, deadliest outbreaks. The new report suggests researchers could combine these two potent antibodies to make a powerful antiviral therapy.

Released: 15-Mar-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study Shows mRNA Vaccine Technology Can Be Used For HIV Vaccines
Duke Health

Using mRNA technology like that in the COVID-19 vaccines, researchers have demonstrated a successful way to deliver a potential HIV vaccine, researchers at Duke Human Vaccine Institute report.

Released: 14-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Trial of innovative HIV vaccine using mRNA technology enrolls first participant
HIV Vaccine Trials Network

The first 12 study participants have been enrolled in a new Phase 1 clinical trial using the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccine technology developed by Moderna. The study evaluates the safety of and immune responses to three different experimental vaccines against HIV. This randomized, open-label trial represents one of the first clinical studies of the use of mRNA vaccine technology against HIV.

Released: 14-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EDT
COVID Infection Rates in Hillsborough County May Have Been Higher Than Reported at Height of Pandemic
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new article published in the March issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Moffitt researchers set out to estimate the percentage of Hillsborough County residents who had COVID infection and better understand demographics and behavioral factors associated with infection.

Newswise: Mutations Leading to Omicron Variant Did Not Enable Virus to Fully Escape Immune System
Released: 11-Mar-2022 9:25 AM EST
Mutations Leading to Omicron Variant Did Not Enable Virus to Fully Escape Immune System
Johns Hopkins Medicine

People who gained immunity — either through vaccination or exposure — against the original strain of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, also are likely to have some protection against the pathogen’s omicron variant, says an international research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Released: 4-Mar-2022 10:05 AM EST
Microneedle approach to address peanut allergy shows promise in mice
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Mice that received treatments with peanut-coated microneedles had significant increased rates of desensitization to peanut allergy compared with epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT), a new study found. The microneedle treatment success was achieved despite applying a dose of peanut protein 10-times lower than the dose delivered by EPIT. Researchers say the findings demonstrate the potential for peanut microneedles to improve food allergen immunotherapy through the skin.

Released: 4-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EST
New structure studies of a critical Nipah virus component may lead to vaccine, antibody treatments
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Researchers at the Uniformed Services University in collaboration with University of Washington, have recently uncovered new details about how Nipah and Hendra viruses infect cells and the immune responses that can block them, which could ultimately lead to the development of new tactics to prevent and treat these deadly illnesses.

Newswise: Are MAIT Cells Key to the Next Wave of Immunotherapy and Vaccine Development?
Released: 24-Feb-2022 11:15 AM EST
Are MAIT Cells Key to the Next Wave of Immunotherapy and Vaccine Development?
Stony Brook University

A Stony Brook University physician-scientist has identified that mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells exercise several complex roles during healthy and disease states. The published findings may help to serve as a benchmark for future research on MAIT cells as targets for immunotherapies and vaccines.

Newswise: UCLA-led team launches new center to study Valley Fever
Released: 10-Feb-2022 7:00 AM EST
UCLA-led team launches new center to study Valley Fever
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A team led by UCLA researchers will receive a multi-million dollar grant to study why some people suffer from a devastating fungal infection called Valley Fever, while others suffer seemingly no impact from the disease.

Released: 4-Feb-2022 11:20 AM EST
Shorter Treatment is Better for Young Children with Outpatient Pneumonia
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Five days of antibiotics is superior to 10 days for children with community-acquired pneumonia who are not hospitalized, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics.

Newswise: Cancer researcher awarded $2.3 million for research toward improving CAR T-cell therapy
Released: 3-Feb-2022 8:05 AM EST
Cancer researcher awarded $2.3 million for research toward improving CAR T-cell therapy
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

In preliminary studies, CHLA researchers have found that increasing the activity of a specific gene inside T-cells makes the T-cells stronger and longer-lasting. This line of research could lead to broader applications for CAR T-cell therapy in treating other cancers that have not responded to this therapy in the past. Chintan Parekh, MD, a physician scientist in the Cancer and Blood Disease Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has received a five-year, $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to pursue this line of research further.

Released: 14-Dec-2021 10:35 AM EST
Duke Institute Lands Federal Contract to Make Vaccine Candidates
Duke Health

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases awarded researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute a contract that enables it to compete for projects advancing investigational vaccines to production for use in early clinical trials.

Newswise: Reducing lung transplant rejection aim of clinical trial funded with $22 million grant
Released: 18-Nov-2021 5:20 PM EST
Reducing lung transplant rejection aim of clinical trial funded with $22 million grant
Washington University in St. Louis

Physicians at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston have received a seven-year, $22 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help lead a multicenter clinical trial evaluating whether a novel immunosuppressant can reduce the risk of organ rejection after a lung transplant.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 9:00 AM EST
Unraveling the pseudoknot: Research to explore the ‘switch’ behind COVID virus
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Binghamton University Chemistry Professor Eriks Rozners has received a two-year $428,330 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for a research project which explores the "switch" behind the coronavirus.

Newswise: Unexpected Antibody Type Found in People with Malaria Infections
Released: 2-Nov-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Unexpected Antibody Type Found in People with Malaria Infections
University of Maryland School of Medicine

In a newly published study, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have detected antibodies primarily made in response to infections in the mucous membranes — in such areas as the lungs, intestines, or vagina — in study participants with malaria.

Released: 2-Nov-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill Scientists Identify New Antibody For COVID-19 and Variants
Duke Health

A research collaboration between scientists at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has identified and tested an antibody that limits the severity of infections from a variety of coronaviruses, including those that cause COVID-19 as well as the original SARS illness.

Newswise: Michael%20s%20Nov%201%20release%20SARS-CoV-2%20Virions%20and%20Single%20Virus%20with%20Spike%20Proteins%20Public%20Domain%20Images_4_pyramid.jpg
Released: 1-Nov-2021 2:00 PM EDT
In Covid-19 Vaccinated People, Those with Prior Infection Likely to Have More Antibodies
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what is believed to be one of the largest studies of its kind, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 (the COVID-19 virus) stay more durable — that is, remain higher over an extended period of time — in people who were infected by the virus and then received protection from two doses of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine compared with those who only got immunized.


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