Curated News: National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

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Released: 10-Aug-2023 10:40 AM EDT
Research team makes surprising discovery of low-noise genes
Virginia Tech

While engaging in cell division research, Silke Hauf and members of her lab made a surprisingly quiet discovery. When cells express RNA, there are always some fluctuations, or noise, in how much RNA is produced. Hauf’s group found several genes whose noise dips below a previously established minimum threshold, known as the noise floor, during expression “We have solid data for this phenomenon,” said Hauf, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech.

Newswise: Nanozymes drive tumor-specific drug delivery while minimizing toxicity
Released: 9-Aug-2023 10:35 AM EDT
Nanozymes drive tumor-specific drug delivery while minimizing toxicity
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Nanozymes—artificial enzymes that can carry out pre-determined chemical reactions—could selectively activate a cancer drug within a tumor while minimizing damage to healthy tissue in a mouse model of triple negative breast cancer.

Newswise: New RNA-based Therapy Combats Melanoma in Mouse Models
24-Jul-2023 11:30 AM EDT
New RNA-based Therapy Combats Melanoma in Mouse Models
Mount Sinai Health System

Investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have designed an innovative RNA-based strategy to activate dendritic cells—which play a key role in immune response—that eradicated tumors and prevented their recurrence in mouse models of melanoma.

Released: 26-Jul-2023 11:30 AM EDT
Unraveling a protein that may inspire a new biotechnology tool
Ohio State University

Scientists have unraveled the step-by-step activation process of a protein with a deep evolutionary history in all domains of life, opening the door to harnessing its functions for use as a biotechnology tool.

Newswise: Let’s see some ID: simulated molecular bouncer helps track protein movement across the nuclear membrane
Released: 13-Jul-2023 12:00 PM EDT
Let’s see some ID: simulated molecular bouncer helps track protein movement across the nuclear membrane
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If the human cell is a nightclub, then the nucleus is a VIP lounge fiercely maintained by the nuclear pore complex. By modeling a dynamic simulation of the NPC, Beckman physicists have theorized as to why some proteins enter the nucleus more readily than others.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded proteins-predict-significant-step-toward-development-of-diabetes
VIDEO
28-Jun-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Proteins Predict Significant Step Toward Development of Diabetes
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have taken an important step forward in predicting who will develop Type 1 diabetes months before symptoms appear.

Released: 7-Jun-2023 8:00 PM EDT
Exposure to “forever chemicals” during pregnancy linked to increased risk of obesity in kids
Brown University

The risks of exposure to “forever chemicals” start even before birth, a new study confirms, potentially setting up children for future health issues.

Released: 1-Jun-2023 5:40 PM EDT
The breakthrough that could lead to new obesity treatments
University of East Anglia

Researchers at the University of East Anglia and the University of Cambridge have made an important discovery in the race to find treatments for obesity and related diseases, such as diabetes. A new study published today is the first to reveal the molecular structure of a protein called ‘Uncoupling protein 1’ (UCP1).

30-May-2023 2:45 PM EDT
New Penn Medicine Study Uncovers Key Details of Fat Cells, Advancing Potential Treatments for Obesity, Diabetes
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

New research has unlocked insights into how “good fat” tissue could potentially be harnessed to combat obesity and remove glucose from the blood, helping to control diabetes. Published today in Science Advances, the work is a collaboration between researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Cambridge, Free University of Brussels and University of East Anglia.

Newswise: Rethinking the Protein Inhibitor Approach to Cancer Therapy
Released: 25-May-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Rethinking the Protein Inhibitor Approach to Cancer Therapy
Stony Brook University

A new method than enables researchers to dial up or tone down the amount of a certain metastatic protein inhibitor (BACH1) within a cell could provide a new path in cancer research that reassesses the effectiveness of protein inhibitors to treat disease.

Released: 17-May-2023 2:00 PM EDT
Study finds cancer cells use a new fuel in absence of sugar
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have discovered a new nutrient source that pancreatic cancer cells use to grow. The molecule, uridine, offers insight into both biochemical processes and possible therapeutic pathways. The findings, published in Nature, show that cancer cells can adapt when they don’t have access to glucose.

Released: 16-May-2023 5:15 PM EDT
Scientists use X-ray beams to determine role of zinc in development of ovarian follicles
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers from Argonne, Michigan State University and Northwestern University used Argonne’s Bionanoprobe beamline to look at the concentration of zinc in egg cells.

   
Released: 4-May-2023 7:40 AM EDT
High School Students Learn the Basics of Base Editing to Cure “GFP-itis”
University of California San Diego

Genome editing is used to modify the genes of living organisms to elicit certain traits, such as climate-resilient crops or treating human disease at the genetic level. It has become increasingly popular in agriculture, medicine and basic science research over the past decade, and will continue to be relevant and utilized well into the future.

   
Newswise: Discovery suggests route to safer pain medications
2-May-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Discovery suggests route to safer pain medications
Washington University in St. Louis

Strategies to treat pain without triggering dangerous side effects such as euphoria and addiction have proven elusive. Now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine have identified a potential pathway to pain relief that neither triggers addiction nor causes hallucinations.

Newswise:Video Embedded even-worms-get-the-munchies
VIDEO
19-Mar-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Even Worms Get the Munchies
University of Oregon

A study, led by University of Oregon neuroscientist Shawn Lockery, points to worms as a useful tool for understanding more about the many roles that cannabinoids naturally play in the body. And it could help researchers develop better drugs that target this system.

   
Released: 14-Apr-2023 3:25 PM EDT
Wayne State researcher receives $1.95 million NIH grant to study impact of inositol homeostasis on essential cellular functions
Wayne State University Division of Research

A researcher from Wayne State University’s Department of Biological Sciences has received a five-year, $1.95 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to identify mechanisms that regulate inositol synthesis in mammalian cells and determine the cellular consequences of inositol depletion.

   
Newswise: AI Tool Predicts Colon Cancer Survival, Treatment Response
Released: 13-Apr-2023 6:25 PM EDT
AI Tool Predicts Colon Cancer Survival, Treatment Response
Harvard Medical School

New AI tool accurately predicts both overall survival and disease-free survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis. The model uses visual markers on pathology images to glean insights into a tumor’s genomic profile and predicts tumor behavior, disease progression, treatment response. The new model could help augment clinical decision-making. Because the AI tool relies on images alone, it could be particularly valuable for hospitals lacking the technology or expertise to perform sophisticated genomic profiling of tumor tissues.

Newswise: Dissecting the Circadian Clock in Real Time
Released: 30-Mar-2023 2:40 PM EDT
Dissecting the Circadian Clock in Real Time
University of California San Diego

Scientists have made progress in understanding the circadian clock, the 24-hour cycle that synchronizes with light-dark exposure, and how it functions. They developed a new way to study how the circadian clock synchronizes in real time, revealing surprises about the clock’s mechanisms.

21-Feb-2023 3:20 PM EST
CHOP Researchers Identify Molecules that Optimize Immune Presentation of Antigens across the Human Population
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified variants of a chaperone molecule that optimizes the binding and presentation of foreign antigens across the human population, which could open the door to numerous applications where robust presentation to the immune system is important, including cell therapy and immunization. The findings were published today in Science Advances.

Newswise: Two new papers demonstrate use of Outbreak.info as one-stop online source for COVID data
Released: 23-Feb-2023 5:45 PM EST
Two new papers demonstrate use of Outbreak.info as one-stop online source for COVID data
Scripps Research Institute

While COVID-19 may be transitioning from a “pandemic” to an “endemic” phase, it remains critically important to continue tracking the virus in real-time.

Released: 14-Feb-2023 2:50 PM EST
Multiplication on, multiplication off: Targeting an enzymatic switch to develop oncology drugs
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Interdisciplinary research highlighted lipid-protein interaction as a new avenue for oncology drug development, demonstrating its functionality by designing small molecule-based inhibitors to target acute myeloid leukemia.

Newswise:Video Embedded computer-model-ids-roles-of-individual-genes-in-early-embryonic-development
VIDEO
Released: 10-Feb-2023 4:35 PM EST
Computer model IDs roles of individual genes in early embryonic development
Washington University in St. Louis

Computer software developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis can predict what happens to complex gene networks when individual genes are missing or dialed up more than usual. Mapping the roles of single genes in these networks is key to understanding healthy development and finding ways to regrow damaged cells and tissues. Likewise, understanding genetic errors could provide insight into birth defects, miscarriage or even cancer.

Newswise: LJI scientists uncover the structure and function of Inmazeb, the first FDA-approved drug for Ebola virus infection
Released: 30-Jan-2023 4:30 PM EST
LJI scientists uncover the structure and function of Inmazeb, the first FDA-approved drug for Ebola virus infection
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Inmazeb (REGN-EB3), developed by Regeneron, is a three-antibody cocktail designed to target the Ebola virus glycoprotein. The drug was first approved for clinical use in October 2020, but its exact mechanism of action has remained unclear.

   
27-Jan-2023 9:45 AM EST
Clemson scientists identify enzyme that reduces diet-induced obesity in humans
Clemson University

Clemson University researchers have identified an enzyme and its products in humans that reduce diet-induced obesity.

Newswise: Study reveals obesity-related trigger that can lead to diabetes
10-Jan-2023 2:00 PM EST
Study reveals obesity-related trigger that can lead to diabetes
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a defect in an enzyme called APT1 interferes with the ability to secrete insulin, contributing to the development of Type 2 diabetes in people who are overweight or obese.

Released: 5-Jan-2023 1:40 PM EST
Electrochemistry converts carbon to useful molecules
Cornell University

A chemistry collaboration led to a creative way to put carbon dioxide to good – and even healthy – use: by incorporating it, via electrosynthesis, into a series of organic molecules that are vital to pharmaceutical development.

Newswise: Dry eye disease alters how the eye’s cornea heals itself after injury
29-Dec-2022 3:15 PM EST
Dry eye disease alters how the eye’s cornea heals itself after injury
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that proteins made by stem cells to help regenerate the cornea may become new targets for treating and preventing injuries to the cornea related to dry eye disease. When eyes are dry, the cornea is more susceptible to injury.

Released: 22-Dec-2022 7:40 PM EST
In some US zip codes, young men face more risk of firearm death than those deployed in recent wars
Brown University

The risk of firearm death in the U.S. is on the rise: in 2020, firearms became the leading cause of death for children, adolescents and young adults. Yet the risk is far from even — young men in some U.S. zip codes face disproportionately higher risks of firearm-related injuries and deaths.

Newswise: Digital Marker for Coronary Artery Disease Built by Researchers at Mount Sinai
19-Dec-2022 7:00 PM EST
Digital Marker for Coronary Artery Disease Built by Researchers at Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai Health System

Using machine learning and clinical data from electronic health records, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York constructed an in silico, or computer-derived, marker for coronary artery disease (CAD) to better measure clinically important characterizations of the disease.

Newswise: Space and time influence G-protein coupled receptor interactions
Released: 5-Dec-2022 3:55 PM EST
Space and time influence G-protein coupled receptor interactions
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

By simulating molecular dynamics, scientists from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital revealed how the selectivity or promiscuity of GPCR coupling relies on the location and duration of intermolecular interactions.

Released: 1-Nov-2022 9:05 AM EDT
Light of Transformation: Research Explores the Inner Workings of Chemical Change
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Chemistry Jennifer Hirschi recently received a Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award for $1.93 million from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to study the mechanisms involved in catalytic reactions.

Released: 27-Oct-2022 4:20 PM EDT
UAlbany Researchers Awarded $1.4M to Identify RNAs Linked to Cancer and Bacterial Infections
University at Albany, State University of New York

Researchers from The RNA Institute at the University at Albany have been awarded $1.4 million to investigate stress-induced RNA modifications and associated cell response. The focus of the study — “wobble uridines” in tRNA — could hold important clues for treating bacterial infections and detecting cancer.

Released: 17-Oct-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Protein IDs, drug candidates, show promise for COVID science
Cornell University

A highly innovative method using the latest technology has generated a comprehensive list of SARS-CoV-2 viral and human proteins that interact with each other, with one such interaction showing the virus directly influencing proteins that regulate the human immune system.

   
Newswise: Jianhua Zhao awarded $2.4M to reveal cancer targets through atomic-resolution imaging
Released: 2-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Jianhua Zhao awarded $2.4M to reveal cancer targets through atomic-resolution imaging
Sanford Burnham Prebys

Assistant Professor Jianhua Zhao, Ph.D., has been awarded a unique and competitive grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The five-year, $2.4 million grant aims to give researchers greater research flexibility to work on fundamental questions in biology.

Newswise: Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
14-Jul-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report they have probed the atomic structure of proteins to add to evidence that the wobbles, shakes and quivers of proteins play a critical role in their ability to function. The findings of the research may help scientists design new drugs that can modify or disrupt the intricate “dances” of proteins to alter their functions.

Newswise: Research Centered on Single Cells May Open Doors to New Discoveries on Disease Processes
Released: 22-Jun-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Research Centered on Single Cells May Open Doors to New Discoveries on Disease Processes
Stony Brook University

Gábor Balázsi, PhD, and his research team in the Laufer Center and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University are embarking upon a new way to research cells, the building blocks of life and often triggers to disease when their behavior changes.

   
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 25-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they discovered that a special sugar molecule could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. If further research confirms the finding, the molecule, known as a glycan, could serve as a new target for early diagnostic tests, treatments and perhaps prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, say the researchers.

Newswise:Video Embedded university-of-kentucky-receives-renewed-11-4-million-grant-to-further-cancer-research
VIDEO
Released: 25-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
University of Kentucky Receives Renewed $11.4 Million Grant to Further Cancer Research
University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky’s Center for Cancer and Metabolism (CCM) will continue its critical mission to research the metabolism of cancer with a renewed Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant award from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The prestigious grant — totaling $11.4 million — will continue to fund UK’s CCM over the next five years.

Released: 19-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Without ‘work-life balance,’ this protein may promote disease
Ohio State University

A family of proteins that have a role in ensuring many types of cells move and maintain their shape may promote disease when they act like workaholics and disrupt the cellular environment, new research suggests.

Newswise: Biologists Pinpoint Key Factor in Immune System Response to Viral Infection
Released: 13-Jan-2022 8:05 PM EST
Biologists Pinpoint Key Factor in Immune System Response to Viral Infection
University of California San Diego

Researchers studying how small worms defend themselves against pathogens have discovered a gene that acts as a first-line response against infection. They identified “ZIP-1” as a centralized hub for immune response, a finding could have implications for understanding human immunity against viruses.

Released: 30-Nov-2021 12:10 PM EST
Johns Hopkins Study: Biosensor Barcodes Identify, Detail ‘Chatting’ Among Cancer Cells
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Ever since the first barcode appeared on a pack of chewing gum in 1974, the now-ubiquitous system has enabled manufacturers, retailers and consumers to quickly and effectively identify, characterize, locate and track products and materials. In a paper first posted online Nov. 26, 2021, in the journal Cell, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and The Johns Hopkins University demonstrate how they can do the same thing at the molecular level, studying the ways cancer cells “talk” with one another.

Newswise:Video Embedded master-developmental-genes-play-role-in-adulthood-according-to-new-study
VIDEO
Released: 18-Nov-2021 10:45 AM EST
Master developmental genes play role in adulthood, according to new study
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Among their many extraordinary feats, some planarian flatworms reproduce by tearing off pieces of themselves to regenerate new worms. Now, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered that this process is controlled by Hox genes, a family of genes known to orchestrate important aspects of early development.

11-Nov-2021 8:20 AM EST
Mouse Cell Studies Show That Correcting DNA Disorganization Could Aid Diagnosis and Treatment of Rare Inherited Diseases
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that a protein that helps form a structural network under the surface of the cell’s “command center” — its nucleus — is key to ensuring that DNA inside it remains orderly.

9-Nov-2021 8:00 AM EST
Safety concerns raised for neuroblastoma candidate drug
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have identified the primary target of the experimental cancer drug CX-5164, revealing a possible risk for late effects of treatment.

Released: 13-Oct-2021 9:00 AM EDT
High Molecular Weight DNA Now Available from NIGMS and NHGRI Collections
Coriell Institute for Medical Research

The NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository (HGCR) and NHGRI Sample Repository for Human Genetic Research (SRHGR) now offer high molecular weight (HMW) DNA samples isolated from cell lines in the collections. HMW DNA is useful for long-read next-generation sequencing and studies that investigate large-scale genomic variation such as structural variation.

Released: 23-Jul-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Research Identifies Potential Role of 'Junk DNA' Sequence in Aging, Cancer
Washington State University

The human body is essentially made up of trillions of living cells.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Wayne State Receives $1.97 Million NIH Grant to Provide Research Training to Undergraduates
Wayne State University Division of Research

Researchers at Wayne State University recently received a nearly $1.97 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health for the T34 program, Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC).

Released: 6-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
New grant-funded research could help improve therapies for sepsis
University of Kentucky

A University of Kentucky College of Medicine professor has been awarded a $1.9 million NIH grant for his research on the body’s immune response to sepsis, which could potentially help to improve therapies for the common disease.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Shape-shifting Ebola virus protein exploits human RNA to change shape
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new Cell Reports study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology demonstrate how Ebola virus has found a different way to get things done. The virus encodes only eight proteins but requires dozens of functions in its lifecycle. The new study shows how one of Ebola virus’s key proteins, VP40, uses molecular triggers in the human cell to transform itself into different tools for different jobs.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a series of experiments that began with amoebas — single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around — Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment.


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