Curated News: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

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8-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
Memory May Be Preserved in Condition with Brain Changes Similar to Alzheimer’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by prominent language problems that worsen over time. About 40% of people with the condition have underlying Alzheimer’s disease. But a new study has found that people with the condition may not develop the memory problems associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in the January 13, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 30-Dec-2020 12:05 PM EST
LSU Health New Orleans discovers potential new RX strategy for stroke
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - New Orleans

Research conducted at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence reports that a combination of an LSU Health-patented drug and selected DHA derivatives is more effective in protecting brain cells and increasing recovery after stroke than a single drug.

Newswise: Research unlocks new information about reading through visual dictionary in the brain
Released: 30-Nov-2020 11:20 AM EST
Research unlocks new information about reading through visual dictionary in the brain
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The uniquely human ability to read is the cornerstone of modern civilization, yet very little is understood about the effortless ability to derive meaning from written words. Scientists at UTHealth have now identified a crucial region in the temporal lobe, know as the mid-fusiform cortex, which appears to act as the brain’s visual dictionary.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Brain Cells that Help Drive Bodily Reaction to Fear, Anxiety
Released: 23-Nov-2020 12:15 PM EST
Scientists Identify Brain Cells that Help Drive Bodily Reaction to Fear, Anxiety
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This research helps illuminate the neural roots of emotions, and points to the possibility that a population of arousal-related neurons might be a target of future treatments for anxiety disorders and other illnesses involving abnormal arousal responses.

Released: 9-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
Novel Drug May Improve Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A novel drug called vamorolone may improve the efficacy of corticosteroid treatment for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy — a rare form of inherited and progressive muscular dystrophy, according findings from a clinical trial published in the journal PLOS Medicine.

Newswise: Study Documents Racial Differences In U.S. Hospice Use And End-Of-Life Care Preferences
Released: 28-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Study Documents Racial Differences In U.S. Hospice Use And End-Of-Life Care Preferences
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment, such as mechanical ventilation, gastronomy tube insertion, hemodialysis, CPR and multiple emergency room visits in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Mayo Clinic contributes to diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ― a disease that has no cure. They also have clarified the role of a gene target associated with the disease.

Released: 13-Oct-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Source of Rare Intellectual Disability Syndrome Discovered
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

New findings from scientists at Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago have revealed previously unknown information about the genetic basis for Armfield XLID syndrome, a rare intellectual disability linked to genetic defects in the X chromosome.

9-Oct-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Scientists Report Role for Dopamine and Serotonin in Human Perception and Decision-making
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have recorded real time changes in dopamine and serotonin levels in the human brain that are involved with perception and decision-making. These same neurochemicals also are critical to movement disorders and psychiatric conditions, including substance abuse and depression.

Released: 6-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Researchers receive more than $53 million to study role of white matter lesions in dementia
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A $53.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will aid brain scientists, including a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), in studying the role of incidental white matter lesions, or WMLs, in dementia among diverse people with cognitive complaints.

Newswise: Virginia Tech scientists advance understanding of blood-brain barrier health
Released: 21-Sep-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Virginia Tech scientists advance understanding of blood-brain barrier health
Virginia Tech

in a study with potential impacts on a variety of neurological diseases, Virginia Tech researchers have provided the first experimental evidence from a living organism to show that an abundant, star-shaped brain cell known as an astrocyte is essential for blood-brain barrier health.

Newswise: How Loss of Single Gene Fuels Deadly Childhood Brain Cancer
Released: 10-Sep-2020 1:40 PM EDT
How Loss of Single Gene Fuels Deadly Childhood Brain Cancer
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers describe how the functional loss of a single gene negatively impacts neural development and promotes the growth of a particularly deadly form of pediatric brain cancer.

Newswise: Brain Cell Death in ALS, Dementia Tied to Loss of Key Biochemical Transport Structure in Nucleus
Released: 2-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Brain Cell Death in ALS, Dementia Tied to Loss of Key Biochemical Transport Structure in Nucleus
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers have long sought to explain precisely how the most common genetic mutation linked to both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia causes the death of nerve cells.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Study Suggests New Potential Approach Against Fatal Childhood Brain Cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

In mouse models of DIPG, simultaneously attacking two metabolic pathways led to significant improvements in survival.

Newswise: “Reelin” In A New Treatment For Multiple Sclerosis
Released: 12-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT
“Reelin” In A New Treatment For Multiple Sclerosis
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Aug. 12, 2020 – In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the amount of a protein made in the liver significantly protected against development of the disease’s characteristic symptoms and promoted recovery in symptomatic animals, UTSW scientists report.

Released: 24-Jul-2020 4:20 PM EDT
UChicago Medicine selected as Chicago’s only official NIH network site researching stroke and dementia
University of Chicago Medical Center

About 30% of stroke patients develop dementia, yet researchers understand very little about why. UChicago Medicine joins a NIH-led national network of institutions working to better understand the risk factors that lead to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID), early stroke recovery and approaches to prevention.

Newswise: Expanding Treatment Options for Severe Brain Trauma
Released: 23-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Expanding Treatment Options for Severe Brain Trauma
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego Health have joined a national research study called Hyperbaric Oxygen Brain Injury Treatment (HOBIT) to assess whether therapy involving 100 percent oxygen under pressure might also benefit patients with severe brain injuries.

Newswise: Study reveals intricate details about Huntington’s disease protein
Released: 17-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Study reveals intricate details about Huntington’s disease protein
University at Buffalo

The research focuses on axonal transport — the way in which vital materials travel along pathways called axons inside nerve cells, or neurons. Scientists found that HTT sometimes journeys along these roadways in cellular vehicles (called vesicles) that also carry freight including a protein called Rab4.

Newswise: Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
Released: 13-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
University of California, Irvine

A compound commonly found in pickled capers has been shown to activate proteins required for normal human brain and heart activity, and may even lead to future therapies for the treatment of epilepsy and abnormal heart rhythms.

Newswise: 7.13.2020WaunShaeOld_Hands__Elderly_GettyImages-962094878.jpg
Released: 13-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Family Caregiving May Not Harm Health of Caregivers After All
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help.

Released: 18-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Doing no harm reduces the risk of stroke
Universite de Montreal

For patients with brain arteriovenous malformations, not having surgery or getting radiation therapy can result in an almost 70-per-cent lower risk of having a stroke or dying, reseachers find.

Newswise: Boosting the immune system's appetite for cancer
Released: 23-Apr-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Boosting the immune system's appetite for cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A combination of immunotherapy agents that encourages some immune cells to eat cancer cells and alert others to attack tumors put mice with a deadly type of brain cancer called glioblastoma into long-term remission.

25-Mar-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Better controlled diabetes is associated with preserved cognitive function following stroke
Endocrine Society

Better glucose control can help people with diabetes who have a common type of stroke to preserve their cognitive function, according to a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting. The abstract will be published in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Released: 6-Mar-2020 2:00 PM EST
Study: Cough That Spreads Tuberculosis Has Pain-Linked Trigger
University of Texas at Dallas

University of Texas System researchers have pinpointed a molecule that the tuberculosis bacterium manufactures to induce the coughing that spreads the disease by triggering a pain-receptor response. Their findings illustrate that the disease's spread might be prevented by halting production of sulfolipid-1.

Released: 2-Mar-2020 2:45 PM EST
Researchers Identify a Protein That Is Critical for Wound Healing after a Central Nervous System Injury
Mount Sinai Health System

after a Central Nervous System Injury (New York – March 2, 2020) Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience.

Newswise: Releasing Brakes: Potential New Methods for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Therapies
Released: 24-Feb-2020 12:10 PM EST
Releasing Brakes: Potential New Methods for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Therapies
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Testing of small molecules in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy shows promise for restoration of muscle structure and function.

Newswise: Fetal Balloon Treatment for Lung-Damaging Birth Defect Works Best When Fetal and Maternal Care Are Highly Coordinated
Released: 19-Feb-2020 10:00 AM EST
Fetal Balloon Treatment for Lung-Damaging Birth Defect Works Best When Fetal and Maternal Care Are Highly Coordinated
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers from The Johns Hopkins Center for Fetal Therapy report new evidence that fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a rare but life-threatening, lung-damaging condition, experience a significantly high rate of success for the fetal treatment known as FETO, if they and their mothers receive coordinated and highly experienced care in the same expert setting.

Newswise: The Human Brain’s Meticulous Interface with the Bloodstream now on a Precision Chip
Released: 10-Feb-2020 11:30 AM EST
The Human Brain’s Meticulous Interface with the Bloodstream now on a Precision Chip
Georgia Institute of Technology

It can be the bain of brain drug developers: The interface between the human brain and the bloodstream, the blood-brain-barrier, is so meticulous that animal models often fail to represent it. This improved chip represents important features more accurately.

Newswise: Study: Two Enzymes Control Liver Damage in NASH
4-Feb-2020 1:40 PM EST
Study: Two Enzymes Control Liver Damage in NASH
University of California San Diego Health

After identifying a molecular pathway that allows nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to progress into liver cell death, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers were able to use these pathways to halt further liver damage.

Newswise:Video Embedded flickering-light-mobilizes-brain-chemistry-that-may-fight-alzheimer-s
VIDEO
Released: 3-Feb-2020 10:20 AM EST
Flickering Light Mobilizes Brain Chemistry That May Fight Alzheimer’s
Georgia Institute of Technology

The promise of flickering light to treat Alzheimer's takes another step forward in this new study, which reveals stark biochemical mechanisms: The 40 Hertz stimulation triggers a marked release of signaling chemicals.

Released: 28-Jan-2020 6:50 PM EST
Stem Cells, CRISPR and Gene Sequencing Technology are Basis of New Brain Cancer Model
University of California San Diego Health

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers created a new type of brain cancer model for glioblastoma using stem cells, CRISPR and gene sequencing.

Newswise: Scientists Find Molecular Key to Body Making Healthy T Cells
24-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Scientists Find Molecular Key to Body Making Healthy T Cells
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system.

Newswise: Brain Studies Show Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Gulf War Illness are Distinct Conditions
18-Oct-2019 1:55 PM EDT
Brain Studies Show Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Gulf War Illness are Distinct Conditions
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Gulf War Illness (GWI) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) share symptoms of disabling fatigue, pain, systemic hyperalgesia (tenderness), negative emotion, sleep and cognitive dysfunction that are made worse after mild exertion (postexertional malaise). Now, neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center have evidence, derived from human brain studies, that GWI and CFS are two distinct disorders that affect the brain in opposing ways.

Newswise: “Metabolic Inhibitor” Compound Extends Survival in Mice with MYC-Expressing Pediatric Brain Tumors
Released: 23-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
“Metabolic Inhibitor” Compound Extends Survival in Mice with MYC-Expressing Pediatric Brain Tumors
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Versions of an antibiotic drug called DON first isolated from soil bacteria more than 60 years ago have shown promising signs of extending survival in mice models of especially lethal pediatric brain tumors marked by the high expression of a cancer-causing gene known as the MYC oncogene, according to results of two studies from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Newswise: Wired to Think
Released: 23-Sep-2019 4:35 AM EDT
Wired to Think
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego research supplies a blueprint for a future generation of electrode sensors—notably microscopically slender diamond needles—that utilizes existing yet nontraditional materials and fabrication procedures for recording electrical signals from every neuron in the cortex at the same time.


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