Curated News: National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

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Newswise: Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19
Released: 9-Aug-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, almost 30% of patients with obesity gained more than 5% of their body weight, and 1 in 7 gained more than 10%. While diet and exercise habits were factors, people with the highest levels of stress, anxiety, and depression reported the most weight gain, UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal Obesity.

Newswise: Sharrief awarded $3.1M NIH grant to test whether telehealth improves racial disparities in outcomes for stroke survivors
Released: 6-Dec-2021 9:40 AM EST
Sharrief awarded $3.1M NIH grant to test whether telehealth improves racial disparities in outcomes for stroke survivors
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A trial testing whether multidisciplinary telehealth intervention will help improve racial disparities in outcomes for adult stroke survivors will be launched at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) with a $3.1 million grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health.

Released: 8-Oct-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Study Shows Medicaid Expansion Increased Access to Bariatric Surgery for Obesity
Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist

Following the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion, access to bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity increased by 31% annually for lower-income Medicaid-covered and uninsured white adults age 26 to 64 but not for Hispanic and Black adults, according to research conducted by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

Newswise: phil-levy-city-sized-for-web-615dcc58d6100.jpg
Released: 7-Oct-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Wayne State wins $18 million from NIH to intercept chronic disease in Black communities
Wayne State University Division of Research

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities has awarded Wayne State University $18.15 million over five years to establish a Center for Multiple Chronic Diseases Associated with Health Disparities: Prevention, Treatment, and Management that will use community-based interventions deployed from three research institutions to fight hypertension, heart failure and coronary heart disease in the Black population.

Released: 5-Oct-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Rutgers and NYU Receive Federal Grant for New Center for Asian Health Promotion and Equity
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, in close collaboration with New York University, has received $11.6 million in funding from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop the Rutgers-NYU Center for Asian Health Promotion and Equity (CAHPE).

Released: 28-Sep-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Addressing Systemic Inequities Linked to Readmission Disparities for Minority Stroke Patients
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Racial minorities are disproportionately affected by stroke, with Black patients experiencing worse post-stroke outcomes than White patients. Racial disparities in stroke outcomes have been linked to suboptimal control of risk factors such as hypertension, lack of access to health care, and decreased utilization of neurologic services. However, it was previously unknown if outcomes for Black ischemic stroke patients were affected by care settings with insufficient nursing resources.

Released: 8-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EST
UCLA-led Study Reveals ‘Hidden Costs’ of Being Black in the U.S.
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A new UCLA-led study analyzed a national sample of the views of Black men and white men found that Black men of all income levels reported experiencing higher levels of discrimination than their white counterparts.

Released: 11-Feb-2021 11:40 AM EST
Low-Income Middle-Aged African-American Women with Hypertension Are Likely to Suffer from Depression
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition.

Released: 25-Aug-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Low-cost, customizable microscope takes top biomedical engineering prize
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

The winners of National Institutes of Health’s 9th annual Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge developed simple and low-cost diagnostics and treatments for conditions such as tuberculosis, cervical cancer, birth defects, and onchocerciasis (river blindness).

   
Released: 28-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Higher BPA Levels Linked to More Asthma Symptoms in Children
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine.

29-Apr-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Neighborhood Racial and Economic Polarization, Hospital of Delivery, and Severe Maternal Morbidity
Mount Sinai Health System

How neighborhood racial and economic spatial polarization, an extreme form of residential segregation, influences maternal health.

Released: 16-Mar-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have found — in newborn mice — that a component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing life-threatening sepsis.

Released: 29-Jan-2020 12:50 PM EST
Highly Active Adults Vary Their Workouts to Meet Exercise Recommendations
New York University

Highly active adults engage in a greater variety of physical activities than do less active adults, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

6-Jan-2020 11:55 AM EST
Race and Ethnicity, Medical Insurance, and Within-Hospital Severe Maternal Morbidity Disparities
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers find black and Latina mothers experience higher rates of severe maternal morbidity as compared with white mothers within the same hospital, with insurance status not responsible for these disparities

Released: 9-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
Lack of insurance cause of survivorship gap in minorities with cancer, study shows
University of Illinois Chicago

Nearly half of the disparity in later-stage diagnosis was mediated by being uninsured or underinsured, according to a new study conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Boston Medical Center/Boston University School of Medicine.


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