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Study shows orthostatic hypotension not associated with higher risk of adverse events among patients undergoing more intensive blood pressure treatment

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have found that orthostatic hypotension was not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, falls, or fainting among participants in The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial. In a study published in the journal Hypertension, the scientists showed that hypertension treatment had no impact on the link between OH and cardiovascular outcomes or other adverse events.

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Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
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Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure. The findings are published in the Journal of Hypertension.

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Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
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Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
27-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST

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With High Fiber Diets, More Protein May Mean More Bloating

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

People who eat high fiber diets are more likely to experience bloating if their high fiber diet is protein-rich as compared to carbohydrate-rich, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Digestive Disorders, Food Science, Health Food, Heart Disease, Microbiome, Nutrition, Public Health, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 8:45 AM EST
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Newswise: New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

Case Western Reserve University

A new drug that could make it easier for doctors to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS) in its earlier stages has been approved for its first human trials by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Channels: All Journal News, Clinical Trials, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Grant Funded News, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 7:30 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    27-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST

Scientists trace the molecular roots of potentially fatal heart condition

Harvard Medical School

At a glance: Research using heart cells from squirrels, mice and people identifies an evolutionary mechanism critical for heart muscle function Gene defect that affects a protein found in the heart muscle interferes with this mechanism to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a potentially fatal heart condition Imbalance in the ratio of active and inactive protein disrupts heart muscle’s ability to contract and relax normally, interferes with heart muscle’s energy consumption Treatment with a small-molecule drug restores proper contraction, energy consumption in human and rodent heart cells If affirmed in subsequent studies, the results can inform therapies that could halt disease progression, help prevent common complications, including arrhythmias and heart failure

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health (NIH), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:35 AM EST
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Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
24-Jan-2020 6:25 PM EST

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‘Jumping genes’ help stabilize DNA folding patterns

Washington University in St. Louis

The DNA molecule inside the nucleus of any human cell is more than six feet long. To fit into such a small space, it must fold into precise loops that also govern how genes are turned on or off. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that "jumping genes" play a surprising role in stabilizing the 3D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell’s nucleus.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cell Biology, Genetics, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
24-Jan-2020 2:10 PM EST
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Opioid Dependence Found to Permanently Change Brains of Rats

University of California San Diego Health

Approximately one-quarter of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, with five to 10 percent developing an opioid use disorder or addiction. In a new study, UC San Diego researchers found that opioid dependence produced permanent changes in the brains of rats.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Mental Health, Neuro, Pain, Psychology and Psychiatry, Substance Abuse, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), PNAS, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
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