Curated News: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

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30-Jul-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Statins May Improve Survival for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A study led by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a significant association between cholesterol-lowering drugs commonly known as statins and survival rates of triple-negative breast cancer patients. Since statins are low in cost, easy to access and produce minimal side effects, this could have an important impact on outcomes for this aggressive disease.

Released: 3-Aug-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Implant Shows Extreme Promise for Regenerating Bone
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Its powers may not rival Wolverine's, but a regenerative implant engineered by researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and University of Nebraska–Lincoln could help repair bone-deep damage following physical trauma, surgery or osteoporosis.

Released: 2-Aug-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Rethinking Remdesivir
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers modify remdesivir, creating oral version that can be taken earlier in COVID-19 diagnoses. In cell and animal studies, revised drug proved effective and safe.

Newswise: UT Southwestern Finds Crucial New Molecular Mechanisms And Biomarkers in Ovarian Cancer
Released: 30-Jul-2021 12:15 PM EDT
UT Southwestern Finds Crucial New Molecular Mechanisms And Biomarkers in Ovarian Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 30, 2021 – UT Southwestern faculty have discovered what appears to be an Achilles’ heel in ovarian cancers, as well as new biomarkers that could point to which patients are the best candidates for possible new treatments.

Newswise: Wayne State Researcher Secures $2.3 Million in NIH Funding for Metabolic Research
Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Wayne State Researcher Secures $2.3 Million in NIH Funding for Metabolic Research
Wayne State University Division of Research

A Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher has been awarded a $2.3 million grant by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, to support research in circadian RNA modification in metabolic disease.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Researchers Find Molecular Switch That Regulates Fat Burning in Mice
Beth Israel Lahey Health

In a new study, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers has demonstrated that a metabolic regulatory molecule called Them1 prevents fat burning in cells by blocking access to their fuel source, which may contribute to the development of a new type of obesity treatment.

Newswise: UAH’s Baudry Lab Part of Half-Million-Dollar Efforts to Target COVID with Drug Therapies
Released: 29-Jul-2021 10:00 AM EDT
UAH’s Baudry Lab Part of Half-Million-Dollar Efforts to Target COVID with Drug Therapies
University of Alabama Huntsville

Two different strategies to discover and perfect pharmaceuticals active against the COVID-19 virus have attracted a half million dollars in research funding to support five institutions, including the Baudry Lab at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

Newswise: Eliminating RNA-Binding Protein Improves Survival in Aggressive Leukemia
26-Jul-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Eliminating RNA-Binding Protein Improves Survival in Aggressive Leukemia
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Removing a protein that is often overexpressed in a rare and aggressive subtype of leukemia can help to slow the cancer’s development and significantly increase the likelihood of survival, according to a study in mice led by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

26-Jul-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Mayo Clinic Scientists Advance Breast, Ovarian Cancer Research with Cryo-Electron Microscopy
Mayo Clinic

Using advanced imaging technology, Mayo Clinic scientists have provided an unprecedented understanding of the BRCA1-BARD1 protein complex, which is often mutated in patients with breast or ovarian cancer. Their paper, published in Nature, identifies aspects of how BRCA1-BARD1 functions, supporting future translational research, cancer prevention efforts and drug development.

26-Jul-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Develop “Dimmer Switch” to Help Control Gene Therapy
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a major advancement in the field of gene therapy for rare and devastating diseases, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a “dimmer switch” system that can control levels of proteins expressed from gene therapy vectors. The system is based on alternative RNA splicing using an orally available small molecule and works effectively in tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The first research regarding this innovation was published today in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Virginia Tech Scientists Tie Improved Learning Processes to Reduced Symptoms of Depression
27-Jul-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Virginia Tech Scientists Tie Improved Learning Processes to Reduced Symptoms of Depression
Virginia Tech

In a Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry study led by Pearl Chiu and Brooks King-Casas of the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, brain imaging and mathematical modeling reveal previously unreported mechanistic features of symptoms associated with major depressive disorder.

Released: 27-Jul-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Penn-led Consortium Identifies More Genetic Markers for Inherited Testicular Cancer
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A meta-analysis of nearly 200,000 men revealed 22 new genetic locations that could be susceptible to inherited testicular germ cell tumors.

Released: 27-Jul-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Wisconsin Bioethics Project Chronicles Pregnancy, Substance Use Disorder and the Law
Morgridge Institute for Research

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is embarking on a massive research project to shed light on early child development, including the health and developmental implications of opioid use during pregnancy. The very first task is to ensure the study — the HEALthy Brain and Child Development study (HBCD) — is on solid legal and ethical ground.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian CDI Scientists Awarded NIH Grant for $6.4 Million to Pursue TB Vaccine
Released: 27-Jul-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Hackensack Meridian CDI Scientists Awarded NIH Grant for $6.4 Million to Pursue TB Vaccine
Hackensack Meridian Health

Focus of the work is bolstering B-cell immunity to help body beat bacteria

Newswise: Scientists Uncover How Decisions About What We See Are Relayed Back Through the Brain
Released: 27-Jul-2021 9:30 AM EDT
Scientists Uncover How Decisions About What We See Are Relayed Back Through the Brain
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered that decisions based on visual information, which involve a complex stream of data flowing forward and backwards along the brain’s visual pathways, is broadcast widely to neurons in the visual system, including to those that are not being used to make the decision.

Newswise: Scientists Uncover How Decisions About What We See Are Relayed Back Through the Brain
Released: 27-Jul-2021 9:30 AM EDT
Scientists Uncover How Decisions About What We See Are Relayed Back Through the Brain
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered that decisions based on visual information, which involve a complex stream of data flowing forward and backwards along the brain’s visual pathways, is broadcast widely to neurons in the visual system, including to those that are not being used to make the decision.

Released: 26-Jul-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Two Types of Blood Pressure Meds Prevent Heart Events Equally, but Side Effects Differ
American Heart Association (AHA)

People who are just beginning treatment for high blood pressure can benefit equally from two different classes of medicine - angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) - yet ARBs may be less likely to cause medication side effects, according to an analysis of real-world data published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

26-Jul-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Discovery Clarifies the Problem of T-Cell “Exhaustion”
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers have discovered a limitation of the immune system in battles against cancers or viruses: T cells remain programmed to stay exhausted even weeks after exposure to a virus ended. Scientists need to take this "T cell exhaustion” into account when devising immune-based therapies.

Released: 26-Jul-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Emergency Department Visits Related to Opioid Overdoses Up Significantly During COVID-19 Pandemic
Mayo Clinic

Emergency department visit rates because of an opioid overdose increased by 28.5% across the U.S. in 2020, compared to 2018 and 2019, recent Mayo Clinic research finds. Emergency visits overall decreased by 14% last year, while visits because of an opioid overdose increased by 10.5%. The result: Opioid overdoses were responsible for 0.32 out of 100 visits, or 1 in every 313 visits, which is up from 0.25, or 1 in every 400 visits, the previous two years.

Newswise: New Approach for Cell Therapy Shows Potential Against Solid Tumors with KRAS Mutations
Released: 25-Jul-2021 10:05 PM EDT
New Approach for Cell Therapy Shows Potential Against Solid Tumors with KRAS Mutations
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new technology for cellular immunotherapy developed by Abramson Cancer Center researchers at Penn Medicine showed promising anti-tumor activity in the lab against hard-to-treat cancers driven by the once-considered “undruggable” KRAS mutation, including lung, colorectal, and pancreatic.

Newswise: NIH Chooses University of Miami Miller School of Medicine to Head Project for Its Safe Return to In-Person School Initiative
Released: 23-Jul-2021 12:15 PM EDT
NIH Chooses University of Miami Miller School of Medicine to Head Project for Its Safe Return to In-Person School Initiative
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is helping to lead a National Institutes of Health (NIH) COVID-19 testing initiative to safely return children to in-person school.

Newswise: 271331_web.jpg
Released: 23-Jul-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Research Identifies Potential Role of 'Junk DNA' Sequence in Aging, Cancer
Washington State University

The human body is essentially made up of trillions of living cells.

Newswise: ‘Feel Good’ Brain Messenger Can Be Willfully Controlled, New Study Reveals
21-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
‘Feel Good’ Brain Messenger Can Be Willfully Controlled, New Study Reveals
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers and their colleagues have discovered that spontaneous impulses of dopamine, the neurological messenger known as the brain’s “feel good” chemical, occur in the brain of mice. The study found that mice can willfully manipulate these random dopamine pulses for reward.

Newswise: ‘Good Cholesterol’ May Protect Liver
Released: 22-Jul-2021 4:15 PM EDT
‘Good Cholesterol’ May Protect Liver
Washington University in St. Louis

The body’s so-called good cholesterol may be even better than we realize. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that one type of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has a previously unknown role in protecting the liver from injury. This HDL protects the liver by blocking inflammatory signals produced by common gut bacteria.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins APL, Amazon Partner to Accelerate Access to High-Res Brain Mapping Data
Released: 22-Jul-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins APL, Amazon Partner to Accelerate Access to High-Res Brain Mapping Data
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

An expanded collaboration between APL and the Amazon Web Services' Open Data Sponsorship Program will further enable the storage and accessibility of ever-expanding neuroimaging datasets generated by the neuroscience research community.

Newswise: Soft Skin Patch Could Provide Early Warning for Strokes, Heart Attacks
Released: 22-Jul-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Soft Skin Patch Could Provide Early Warning for Strokes, Heart Attacks
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego engineers developed a soft, stretchy ultrasound patch that can be worn on the skin to monitor blood flow through vessels deep inside the body. Such a device can make it easier to detect cardiovascular problems, like blockages in the arteries that could lead to strokes or heart attacks.

Newswise: Tulane Spin-Out Company to Develop New Treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Released: 22-Jul-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Tulane Spin-Out Company to Develop New Treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Tulane University

The Tulane spin-out BioAesthetics is teaming up with a Tulane biomedical engineering professor to develop a new graft for treating pelvic organ prolapse, which affects millions of women around the world. BioAesthetics, whose CEO and COO are both Tulane graduates, is collaborating with Tulane researcher Kristin Miller, an associate professor of biomedical engineering whose lab will conduct the testing of the graft.

19-Jul-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Gene Therapy May Preserve Vision in Retinal Disease and Serious Retinal Injury
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers uncover a potential pathway for treatment that can prevent blindness

Newswise: Scientists Discover Gene Therapy Provides Neuroprotection to Prevent Glaucoma Vision Loss
19-Jul-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Scientists Discover Gene Therapy Provides Neuroprotection to Prevent Glaucoma Vision Loss
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

A form of gene therapy protects optic nerve cells and preserves vision in mouse models of glaucoma, according to research supported by NIH’s National Eye Institute. The findings suggest a way forward for developing neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma, a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Artificial Intelligence Models to Analyze Cancer Images Can Take Shortcuts That Introduce Bias for Minority Patients
University of Chicago Medical Center

New study of artificial intelligence tools that analyze tumor images shows how they can make inaccurate predictions based on the institution that submitted the image

Newswise:Video Embedded new-study-provides-clues-to-decades-old-mystery-about-cell-movement
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New Study Provides Clues to Decades-Old Mystery About Cell Movement
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A new study, led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities engineering researchers, shows that the stiffness of protein fibers in tissues, like collagen, are a key component in controlling the movement of cells. The groundbreaking discovery provides the first proof of a theory from the early 1980s and could have a major impact on fields that study cell movement from regenerative medicine to cancer research.

Newswise: FAU Nursing Faculty Member Receives NIH K01 
Grant for Breast Cancer Research
Released: 22-Jul-2021 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Nursing Faculty Member Receives NIH K01 Grant for Breast Cancer Research
Florida Atlantic University

Tarsha Jones, Ph.D., principal investigator and an assistant professor of nursing at FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, has received the National Institute of Health (NIH) K01 Career Development Award, a five-year, $772,525 award for a project titled, “Decision Support for Multigene Panel Testing and Family Risk Communication among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Young Breast Cancer Survivors.”

Newswise: Structural Biology Provides Long-Sought Solution to Innate Immunity Puzzle
Released: 22-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Structural Biology Provides Long-Sought Solution to Innate Immunity Puzzle
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers report the first structural confirmation that endogenous – or self-made – molecules can set off innate immunity in mammals via a pair of immune cell proteins called the TLR4−MD-2 receptor complex. The work has wide-ranging implications for finding ways to treat and possibly prevent autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

Newswise: Researchers Find Immune Component to Rare Neurodegenerative Disease
Released: 21-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Researchers Find Immune Component to Rare Neurodegenerative Disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have identified an immune protein tied to the rare neurodegenerative condition known as Niemann-Pick disease type C. The finding, made in mouse models and published online in Nature, could offer a powerful new therapeutic target for Niemann-Pick disease type C, a condition that was identified more than a century ago but still lacks effective treatments.

Newswise: C Is for Vitamin C—a Key Ingredient for Immune Cell Function
19-Jul-2021 3:30 PM EDT
C Is for Vitamin C—a Key Ingredient for Immune Cell Function
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) help control inflammation and autoimmunity in the body. Unfortunately, it has proven difficult to find the right molecular ingredients to induce stable iTregs. A new study reports that Vitamin C and TET proteins can work together to give Tregs their life-saving power.

Released: 20-Jul-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Research: Cells Expressing Tendon Markers Fuse Into Muscles
American Technion Society

Israeli researchers have made a breakthrough discovery that muscle fibers are of hybrid origins. The findings highlight a mechanism that enables a smooth transition from muscle fiber characteristics towards tendon features that is essential for forming robust muscle tendon junctions (MTJs).

Released: 20-Jul-2021 3:05 PM EDT
New Discoveries Reveal How Acute Myeloid Leukemia Walks a Fine Line Between Growth and Cell Death
University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers revealed new insights into how acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops and progresses, according to a study published in Molecular Cell on July 20, 2021. They describe a mechanism by which AML cells regulate a cancer-related protein, mutant IDH2, to increase the buildup of blood cancer cells—a distinguishing characteristic of the disease.

Newswise: UCI-Led Study Finds Unleashing Certain T Cells May Lead to New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis
Released: 20-Jul-2021 1:15 PM EDT
UCI-Led Study Finds Unleashing Certain T Cells May Lead to New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis
University of California, Irvine

In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found that a certain protein prevented regulatory T cells (Tregs) from effectively doing their job in controlling the damaging effects of inflammation in a model of multiple sclerosis (MS), a devastating autoimmune disease of the nervous system.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 3:15 PM EDT
New High-Tech Portal Launched to Speed Hearing Loss Innovations
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) launched a new online tool that could more quickly advance medical discoveries to reverse progressive hearing loss. The tool enables easy access to genetic and other molecular data from hundreds of technical research studies involving hearing function and the ear.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 6:30 PM EDT
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Reveals Even Transient Chromosomal Errors Can Initiate Cancer
Ludwig Cancer Research

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has found that inducing random chromosome instability (CIN) events in mice for as little as one week is enough to trigger harmful chromosomal patterns in cells that spur the formation of tumors.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Study Shows Strong Association Between Perceived Risk, Availability and Past-Year Cannabis Use
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Combined perceptions of the risk and availability of cannabis influence the risk of cannabis use more than perceived risk and perceived availability alone, according to a new study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Released: 14-Jul-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Researchers Discover How Hunger Boosts Learning About Food in Mice
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A study sheds new light on the complex interplay among the neurons that govern hunger, behavior and learning.

Newswise: Fungi That Live in the Gut Influence Health and Disease
11-Jul-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Fungi That Live in the Gut Influence Health and Disease
University of Utah Health

Bacteria’s role in gut health has received a lot of attention in recent years. But new research publishing in Nature shows that fungi—another microorganism that lives within us—may be equally important in health and disease. Fungi thrive in the healthy gut, but when interactions with the immune system are off-balance, they cause intestinal damage that may contribute to gastrointestinal disease. Additional investigation demonstrate that vaccines could be developed as therapeutics to improve gut health.

Newswise: Computational Modeling Results in New Findings for Preeclampsia Patients
Released: 13-Jul-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Computational Modeling Results in New Findings for Preeclampsia Patients
University of California San Diego

Researchers used Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center to conduct cellular modeling to detail the differences between normal and preeclampsia placental tissue.

Newswise: Recent Study Identifies 11 Candidate Genetic Variants for Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 13-Jul-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Recent Study Identifies 11 Candidate Genetic Variants for Alzheimer’s Disease
University of Kentucky

A recently published study co-authored by University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging researcher Justin Miller, Ph.D., identifies 11 rare candidate variants for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers found 19 different families in Utah that suffered from Alzheimer’s disease more frequently than what is considered normal.

Newswise: Selective, Toxin-Bearing Antibodies Could Help Treat Liver Fibrosis
Released: 12-Jul-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Selective, Toxin-Bearing Antibodies Could Help Treat Liver Fibrosis
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers discovered that immunotoxins targeting the protein mesothelin prevent liver cells from producing collagen, a precursor to fibrosis and cirrhosis, in mouse models of human disease.

Newswise:Video Embedded protein-appears-to-prevent-tumor-cells-from-spreading-via-blood-vessels
VIDEO
Released: 12-Jul-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Protein Appears to Prevent Tumor Cells from Spreading Via Blood Vessels
Johns Hopkins University

Researchers have identified a specialized protein that appears to help prevent tumor cells from entering the bloodstream and spreading to other parts of the body.

Released: 8-Jul-2021 1:55 PM EDT
UCLA Fielding School Professor’s Team Awarded more than $5.2 Million in Grants for HIV Prevention
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A team of researchers co-led by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiology professor Dr. Matthew Mimiaga has received more than $5.2 million in grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and test interventions in the U.S. and Brazil.

Newswise: New Alzheimer’s Treatment Targets Identified
7-Jul-2021 4:30 PM EDT
New Alzheimer’s Treatment Targets Identified
Washington University in St. Louis

A research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified potential new treatment targets for Alzheimer’s disease, as well as existing drugs with therapeutic potential.

Newswise: ALS: Study Shows Role of Brain's Immune Cells
Released: 8-Jul-2021 10:30 AM EDT
ALS: Study Shows Role of Brain's Immune Cells
Cedars-Sinai

Hyperactive immune cells in the brain may play a role in the early development of the neurodegenerative disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and a form of dementia that strikes younger people, according to a study conducted by investigators from Cedars-Sinai and published in the journal Neuron.


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