Curated News: NEJM

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Newswise: Study Confirms Pathogenesis of EV-D68 Virus Causing Polio-like Paralyzing Illness in Children
Released: 26-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Study Confirms Pathogenesis of EV-D68 Virus Causing Polio-like Paralyzing Illness in Children
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A case report published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides evidence that enterovirus D68 directly infects spinal cord neurons and that a corresponding robust immune response is present – a direct causation to the polio-like paralyzing illness, acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Matthew Vogt, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology at the UNC School of Medicine is the lead author of the study.

Released: 26-May-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Drugs Used to Treat Blood Cancer Could Activate “Sleeping” Cancer-Causing Gene
National University of Singapore

Hypomethylating agents (HMA) are currently used as a first-line treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) - a group of disorders where there is insufficient production of healthy mature blood cells in the bone marrow - and increasingly in other diseases, but their mechanism of action remains unclear.

Released: 18-May-2022 5:00 PM EDT
COVID Booster Needed for Broad Protection Against Omicron Variants
Ohio State University

A COVID-19 booster shot will provide strong and broad antibody protection against the range of omicron sublineage variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in circulation, two new studies using serum from human blood samples suggest.

Released: 16-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Drug Combination Reduces the Risk of Asthma Attacks
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A global study of asthma patients by Rutgers and an international team of researchers found a combination of two drugs dramatically reduces the chances of suffering an asthma attack.

Released: 15-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers Find Favorable Tradeoffs of PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

University Hospitals’ Jonathan Shoag, MD, and a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University and the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical Center, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and others, set out to assess the tradeoffs of PSA screening using long-term epidemiologic data. “No matter the assumptions,” Shoag said, “the data showed lower numbers than prior estimates, many in the low single digits, for the number needed to treat to prevent a prostate-cancer death. This result was observed in all men, and especially for Black men.” The researchers presented their findings in a late-breaking abstract at the American Urological Association’s annual meeting this month and the study was published May 15 in The New England Journal of Medicine Evidence.

Newswise: Changing Guidelines for Treating Mild Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy
Released: 28-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Changing Guidelines for Treating Mild Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy
Ochsner Health System

Based upon a clinical trial of pregnant women at more than 70 sites, including Ochsner Health, doctors are recommending that even mild forms of high blood pressure be treated with medication.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Mayo Clinic Expert Calls for Public Health Measures to Improve Diet, Reduce Cancer Risk
Mayo Clinic

A review article by Mayo Clinic researchers emphasizes that early onset colorectal cancer, defined as being diagnosed when younger than 50, continues to steadily increase in the U.S. and other higher income countries. This increase, along with a decline in later-onset cases due primarily to screening have shifted the median age at diagnosis from 72 years in the early 2000s to 66 years now.

Newswise: UNC Landmark Study Paves the Way for Universal Obstetric Ultrasound
Released: 26-Apr-2022 2:00 PM EDT
UNC Landmark Study Paves the Way for Universal Obstetric Ultrasound
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Establishing accurate gestational age with ultrasound early is essential to delivering high-quality care. Yet, the high cost for equipment and the need for trained sonographers limits its use in low-resource settings. A new study introduces a novel opportunity to democratize obstetric ultrasound.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 5:00 PM EDT
Firearms now the top cause of death among children, adolescents, U-M data analysis shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Firearms have surpassed motor vehicles as the leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the United States, according to new federal data analyzed by researchers at the University of Michigan.

Released: 18-Apr-2022 3:45 PM EDT
COVID-19 Vaccine Protects Kids and Teens from Severe Illness
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Results of a new multicenter study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that vaccination with a primary series of the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA COVID-19 vaccine reduced the risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in children ages 5–11 years by two-thirds during the Omicron period.

Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Rilzabrutinib for blood disorder shows promise in phase 1–2 clinical trial
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Drug may safely boost platelet levels in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

Newswise: Immunotherapy Plus Chemotherapy Before Surgery Improves Outcomes for Lung Cancer Patients
Released: 11-Apr-2022 11:15 AM EDT
Immunotherapy Plus Chemotherapy Before Surgery Improves Outcomes for Lung Cancer Patients
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Adding the immunotherapy drug nivolumab to chemotherapy before surgery (neoadjuvant) for patients with operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reduced the risk of recurrence of the cancer or death by more than one-third, according to results from the phase III CheckMate-816 trial.

6-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Pulse Oximeters Did Not Change Outcomes for Patients in COVID-19 Monitoring Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Already checked regularly for worsening symptoms via automated text messages, COVID-19 patients with pulse oximeters in a home monitoring program had similar recovery to those without them.

Newswise: Update: Cedars-Sinai’s L.A. Barbershop Study
Released: 2-Apr-2022 11:05 PM EDT
Update: Cedars-Sinai’s L.A. Barbershop Study
Cedars-Sinai

The Los Angeles Barbershop Blood Pressure Study is delivering cutting-edge insights more than four years after the study results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

31-Mar-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Major bleeding reduced in patients having non-cardiac surgery
McMaster University

The drug tested, tranexamic acid (TXA), was given to patients at risk of bleeding or vascular complications. The study found that TXA did not increase deep vein clotting known as VTE, heart attack, non-hemorrhagic stroke, or other major vascular complication in the 30 days after surgery. In the study, half of 9,535 patients in 22 countries were randomly assigned TXA, half placebo. Patients were 45 years or older (average age 69 years); 44% of them were female.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins-Led Study Finds Convalescent Plasma Can Be Effective Early Covid-19 Therapy
Released: 30-Mar-2022 5:10 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins-Led Study Finds Convalescent Plasma Can Be Effective Early Covid-19 Therapy
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins research shows that high-titer (antibody-rich) COVID convalescent plasma — when administered to COVID-19 outpatients within nine days after testing positive — reduced the need for hospitalization for more than half of a study’s predominantly unvaccinated outpatients.

Newswise: FDA Approved New Immunotherapy Regimen for Patients with Melanoma Based on Johns Hopkins Research
Released: 23-Mar-2022 12:25 PM EDT
FDA Approved New Immunotherapy Regimen for Patients with Melanoma Based on Johns Hopkins Research
Johns Hopkins Medicine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a novel therapy for patients with metastatic or inoperable melanoma, an aggressive type of skin cancer. The treatment is developed based on original research conducted at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Released: 16-Mar-2022 1:20 PM EDT
Using Artificial Intelligence to Solve One of Health Care’s Most Enduring Problems
Northwestern Medicine

Northwestern Medicine built its own artificial intelligence program to trigger follow up on incidental imaging findings to prevent delayed and missed care

Released: 10-Mar-2022 4:15 PM EST
Antivirals, some antibodies, work well against BA.2 omicron variant of COVID-19 virus
University of Wisconsin-Madison

The antiviral therapies remdesivir, molnupiravir, and the active ingredient in Pfizer’s Paxlovid pill (nirmatrelvir), remain effective in laboratory tests against the BA.2 variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The BA.2 variant also remains susceptible to at least some of the monoclonal antibodies used to treat COVID-19, such as Evusheld by AstraZeneca.

8-Mar-2022 9:55 AM EST
Ribociclib added to endocrine therapy extends survival in postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A study led by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed a significant overall survival benefit with ribociclib plus endocrine therapy for postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer. The results were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine and were first reported at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress 2021.

Newswise: UTSW faculty addresses difficulty of diagnosing heart attacks in New England Journal of Medicine
Released: 3-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EST
UTSW faculty addresses difficulty of diagnosing heart attacks in New England Journal of Medicine
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Diagnosing heart attacks after heart surgery remains difficult due to shortcomings of current diagnostic tools when applied to postoperative patients, including the electrocardiogram and blood tests to detect levels of cardiac troponins, according to an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) written by two UT Southwestern faculty members.

28-Feb-2022 1:55 PM EST
First Potential Immunization Against RSV for Healthy Infants Found Highly Effective in Phase 3 Trial
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Nirsevimab showed 74.5 percent efficacy against medically attended lower respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in healthy infants, according to an international, randomised, placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial. It is the first potential immunization against RSV in the general infant population, with a single dose providing safe protection across the entire RSV season. Results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise: Better assessment of risk from heart surgery results in better patient outcomes
28-Feb-2022 8:05 AM EST
Better assessment of risk from heart surgery results in better patient outcomes
McMaster University

This study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, assessed patients having heart surgery, measured troponin before and daily for the first few days after surgery, and assessed death and the incidence of major vascular complications – such as heart attack, stroke or life-threatening blood clot – after heart surgery. The study involved 15,984 adult patients with an average age just over 63 years undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were from 12 countries, with more than a third of the countries being outside of North America and Europe.

24-Feb-2022 3:05 PM EST
Antibiotic doesn’t prevent future wheezing in babies hospitalized with RSV
Washington University in St. Louis

Antibiotics provide no benefit in preventing future recurrent wheezing in babies hospitalized with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. And there is some evidence that antibiotics may make wheezing worse.

Released: 22-Feb-2022 2:20 PM EST
Gene Therapy for Thalassemia Ends Need for Transfusions in Young Children
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Over 90 percent of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia, an inherited blood disorder, no longer needed monthly blood transfusions years after receiving gene therapy, according to an international Phase 3 clinical trial that for the first time included children younger than 12 years of age. Twenty-two patients were evaluated (ranging in age 4-34 years), including pediatric patients enrolled at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

Released: 17-Feb-2022 1:05 PM EST
A possible cure for sickle cell?
Boston University School of Medicine

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder where red blood cells become sickle/crescent shaped. It causes frequent infections, swelling in the hands and legs, pain, severe tiredness and delayed growth or puberty.

Released: 27-Jan-2022 7:05 PM EST
Trial Co-led by University of Maryland School of Medicine Scientist Confirms Safety of “Mix-and-Match” COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Dosing
University of Maryland Medical Center

An ongoing study just published in The New England Journal of Medicine was pivotal in allowing mixed use of booster COVID-19 shots -- critical as the U.S. experienced the Omicron surge.

Newswise: Mix-and-match trial finds additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine safe, immunogenic
Released: 27-Jan-2022 5:25 PM EST
Mix-and-match trial finds additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine safe, immunogenic
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

In adults who had previously received a full regimen of any of three COVID-19 vaccines granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), an additional booster dose of any of these vaccines was safe and prompted an immune response, according to preliminary clinical trial results reported in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise: NEJM: New Data on COVID-19 Lung Transplants
Released: 26-Jan-2022 5:30 PM EST
NEJM: New Data on COVID-19 Lung Transplants
Cedars-Sinai

A Smidt Heart Institute analysis of lung transplantations performed nationally shows significant help for patients with severe, irreversible lung damage from COVID-19.

Newswise: Including People with Disabilities in Clinical Research is Key to Reducing Health Inequality
Released: 25-Jan-2022 1:00 PM EST
Including People with Disabilities in Clinical Research is Key to Reducing Health Inequality
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For research to be applicable to all segments of the population, Swenor and her co-author, Jennifer Deal, Ph.D., M.H.S., assistant professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, say that guidelines for including people in specific studies should avoid ruling out people with disabilities.

4-Jan-2022 5:05 PM EST
Relatlimab plus nivolumab improves progression-free survival in metastatic melanoma
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

In patients with untreated, advanced melanoma, the combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors relatlimab and nivolumab doubled the progression-free survival benefit compared to nivolumab alone, with a manageable safety profile.

Released: 23-Dec-2021 10:45 AM EST
Improving Medication Treatment Leads to Dramatic Gains in Emergency Department Care for Opioid Use Disorder
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Making initiation of buprenorphine easy and timely was associated with a 25 percent increase in the likelihood of its use of treatment in Penn Medicine emergency departments

Released: 22-Dec-2021 5:05 PM EST
Mount Sinai researcher shows novel drug significantly improves signs and symptoms of generalized pustular psoriasis—a rare and life-threatening disease
Mount Sinai Health System

Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a rare, life-threatening skin condition for which there are no approved treatments. It is characterized by episodes of widespread eruptions of painful, sterile pustules (blisters of non-infectious pus). There is a high unmet need for treatments that can rapidly and completely resolve the signs and symptoms of GPP flares. Flares greatly affect a person’s quality of life and can lead to hospitalization with serious complications, including heart failure, renal failure, sepsis, and death.

Newswise: Receiving CAR-T therapy sooner improves lymphoma survival, according to study published in New England Journal of Medicine
Released: 17-Dec-2021 4:15 PM EST
Receiving CAR-T therapy sooner improves lymphoma survival, according to study published in New England Journal of Medicine
University of Kansas Cancer Center

Axicabtagene ciloleucel, known by the brand name Yescarta, is significantly more effective than the current standard of care in treating people with large B-cell lymphoma who relapse after the first line of treatment.

Released: 17-Dec-2021 11:05 AM EST
New gene therapy could provide cure for sickle cell disease, according to UAB study
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Although unproven, this novel sickle cell therapy serves as a potential cure. More measures need to be taken to determine long-term function and organ improvement.

Released: 16-Dec-2021 12:30 PM EST
Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine Found to be Safe and Effective in Phase 3 Trial Conducted by UM School of Medicine Researchers
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Research Shows Vaccine Has 90 Percent Efficacy at Preventing Infections; Moderate to Severe Disease Occurred Only in Placebo Recipients

Released: 16-Dec-2021 10:20 AM EST
Belzutifan offers hope for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The anti-cancer effect of the drug may help those with rare, hereditary cancer syndromes avoid surgeries by shrinking tumors via a daily oral dose.

Newswise: Moffitt Study Shows Lymphoma Patients Can Benefit from Receiving CAR T Sooner
Released: 11-Dec-2021 8:30 AM EST
Moffitt Study Shows Lymphoma Patients Can Benefit from Receiving CAR T Sooner
Moffitt Cancer Center

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy or CAR T is a breakthrough treatment for patients with certain types of blood cancers. The cellular therapy uses a patient’s own immune cells that are reengineered to better seek out and destroy cancer cells. The single infusion treatment is approved for patients who have relapsed after two or more types of therapy but results from the ZUMA-7 clinical trial show lymphoma patients can benefit from receiving the CAR T product axicabtagene ciloleucel (Yescarta) sooner.

Newswise: 3D Information and Biomedicine: How Artificial Intelligence/Machine Intelligence will contribute to Cancer Patient Care and Vaccine Design
Released: 7-Dec-2021 12:35 PM EST
3D Information and Biomedicine: How Artificial Intelligence/Machine Intelligence will contribute to Cancer Patient Care and Vaccine Design
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS) explored how Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning will complement existing approaches focused on genome-protein sequence information, including identifying mutations in human tumors published online December 2 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

22-Nov-2021 2:55 PM EST
Belzutifan induced strong responses in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease-associated kidney cancer
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Results from a Phase II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that treatment with belzutifan, a small-molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a, achieved strong clinical activity in patients with renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and non-renal cell carcinoma neoplasms associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. The study was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 24-Nov-2021 5:00 PM EST
Antibodies mimicking the virus may explain long haul COVID-19, rare vaccine side effects
UC Davis Health

A new article published in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests that secondary antibodies known as “anti-idiotype antibodies” could be responsible for some of the side effects of COVID-19 vaccines and the symptoms of long-haul COVID.

15-Nov-2021 6:30 AM EST
CHOP-led Study Shows Novel Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A Leads to Sustained Expression of Clotting Factor and Reduced Bleeding Events
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A novel gene therapy for hemophilia A led to sustained expression of the clotting factor those patients lack, resulting in a reduction – or in some cases complete elimination – of painful and potentially life-threatening bleeding events, according to a new study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The results of the phase 1/2 trial, which were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, are the first to demonstrate stable coagulation factor VIII in hemophilia A patients following gene therapy.

Newswise: Simultaneous Repair of Heart Valves May Benefit Some Adults
Released: 16-Nov-2021 11:20 AM EST
Simultaneous Repair of Heart Valves May Benefit Some Adults
Johns Hopkins Medicine

An international study of more than 400 adults concludes that people who undergo mitral valve surgery (between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the heart) and also have less than severe leakage of the tricuspid valve (a section of the heart that directs blood from the right atrium to the ventricle) may benefit from having both valves repaired at the same time.

Newswise: Jeffrey-Weitz.png
11-Nov-2021 1:55 PM EST
Milvexian an effective and safe oral pill for prevention of venous blood clots, says study
McMaster University

Researchers compared milvexian with enoxaparin for prevention of blood clots in 1,242 patients from18 countries undergoing knee replacement surgery who were enrolled between June 2019 and February 2021.They found that at a total daily dose of 100 mg or more, milvexian resulted in better clot protection but no increase in bleeding compared with enoxaparin, the control drug. Milvexian was evaluated in daily doses ranging from 25 to 400 mg; there was no increase in bleeding over this wide range of doses.

Newswise: Researchers Link Pollution to Cardiovascular Disease, 
Develop Strategies to Reduce Exposure and Encourage Government Intervention
10-Nov-2021 9:35 AM EST
Researchers Link Pollution to Cardiovascular Disease, Develop Strategies to Reduce Exposure and Encourage Government Intervention
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

In a new review article, published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from University Hospitals (UH), Case Western Reserve University and Boston College discuss evidence linking pollution and cardiovascular disease. The research team highlights strategies for reducing individual exposure to pollution, and the importance of government-supported interventions encouraging clean energy.

Released: 3-Nov-2021 3:55 PM EDT
New commentary paper highlights costs of defects in surgical care and calls for elimination of defects in value
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

A commentary, published in the Nov. 3 issue of the journal NEJM Catalyst Innovations in Care Delivery, highlights how defects in surgical care could be diminished or eliminated for the benefit of patients and to lower costs in American health care spending. Using colorectal surgery to provide examples and national estimates of the costs of defects in surgical care, the paper summarizes a holistic approach to eliminating defects in surgical care and offers a framework for centers of excellence for removing them. The paper estimates that defects in colorectal surgery cost the American health care system more than $12 billion. The authors discuss eight areas (or domains) of defects that waste money and/or contribute to lower value in care for colorectal surgery patients.

Released: 28-Oct-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Monoclonal antibody treatment highly effective at reducing COVID-19 hospitalizations
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Researchers published interim results in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Phase 3 study of the COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment sotrovimab, sponsored by Vir Biotechnology and GlaxoSmithKline. The study found that compared to the placebo group, COVID-19 patients who received sotrovimab had a significantly reduced risk of hospitalization or death and that the treatment, which was administered by intravenous infusion on an outpatient basis, was safe.

Released: 28-Oct-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Biased tech could determine who gets life saving therapy
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Research uncovers racial bias in oxygen readings during the COVID-19 pandemic, even amongst patients needing ECMO.

Released: 21-Oct-2021 6:50 PM EDT
Vaccines offer strong protection against death from Delta, study says
University of Edinburgh

Vaccination is over 90 per cent effective at preventing deaths from the Delta variant of Covid-19, according to the first country-level data on mortality.


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