Curated News: NEJM

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Newswise: Barbershops Targeted to Improve Health of Black Men
Released: 18-Feb-2020 9:40 AM EST
Barbershops Targeted to Improve Health of Black Men
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Black men with high blood pressure could benefit from a research study beginning this month to check their vitals while they are getting a haircut at a barbershop.

Released: 13-Feb-2020 2:15 PM EST
Scholarly Journals Work Together to Disseminate Knowledge in Ob-Gyn
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers-led study in JAMA Network Open, found substantial differences between top-cited ob-gyn articles that were published in non-specialty journals compared to those published in ob-gyn journals.

Released: 12-Feb-2020 6:35 PM EST
Perspective in NEJM: Modernize scope-of-practice laws
University of Washington School of Medicine

Around the country, the collective voice of eight directors of health workforce research centers came together to call for a reforming of laws and regulations that limit the practice of health professionals. Their commentary was published Feb. 12 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 11-Feb-2020 2:40 PM EST
Fewer Steroids, No Plasma Exchange: A Change in Treatment for Vasculitis
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The insights from the PEXIVAS Trial, a 10-year study, shows treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis can become much more patient-friendly by using half the typical dose of steroids and no blood plasma exchanges

Newswise: New Treatment Discovered for Rare Eye Disease May Prevent Blindness
Released: 10-Feb-2020 6:50 AM EST
New Treatment Discovered for Rare Eye Disease May Prevent Blindness
Cedars-Sinai

Patients with thyroid eye disease who used the minimally invasive insulin-like growth factor I blocking antibody, teprotumumab, experienced improvement in their symptoms, appearance and quality of life, according to a study recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise: CD19 CAR NK-cell therapy achieves 73% response rate in patients with leukemia and lymphoma
Released: 3-Feb-2020 4:05 PM EST
CD19 CAR NK-cell therapy achieves 73% response rate in patients with leukemia and lymphoma
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

According to results from a Phase I/IIa trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with cord blood-derived chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) natural killer (NK)-cell therapy targeting CD19 resulted in clinical responses in a majority of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no major toxicities observed.

Newswise: Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives!
Released: 5-Feb-2020 3:10 PM EST
Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives!
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Dr. Douglas E. Wood describes the findings from the NELSON Trial and what they mean for policy and program development for lung cancer early detection through CT screening.

Released: 4-Feb-2020 1:15 PM EST
Researchers Reveal Target in Acute Kidney Injury Prevention
Rush University Medical Center

Physician-Scientists and other researchers at Rush University Medical Center, in collaboration with colleagues at other institutions, have revealed a new treatment target that may help change the outcome for patients at risk of AKI.

Newswise: NEJM: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Shows Similar Safety Outcomes as Open-Heart Surgery
Released: 30-Jan-2020 8:40 AM EST
NEJM: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Shows Similar Safety Outcomes as Open-Heart Surgery
Cedars-Sinai

A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and other centers nationwide shows that patients who underwent a minimally invasive transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), had similar key 5-year clinical outcomes of death and stroke as patients who had traditional open-heart surgery to replace the valve. The study appears on the New England Journal of Medicine site.

Newswise: Infectious Disease Experts Sound Alarm Over Risk of Outbreaks in U.S. Border Detention Centers
Released: 29-Jan-2020 5:00 PM EST
Infectious Disease Experts Sound Alarm Over Risk of Outbreaks in U.S. Border Detention Centers
University of Maryland School of Medicine

– Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks.



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