Curated News: Neurology (journal)

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11-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Researchers Identify New Gene that May Increase Risk of ALS
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers have identified a new gene that may increase a person’s risk of developing ALS, according to a new study published in the June 16, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The gene, called TP73, produces a protein to help regulate the life cycle of a cell. Researchers found that some people with ALS have mutations in this gene and that the mutations may interfere with nerve cell health.

5-Jun-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Disparities in Treatment Persist for People with Headache
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Disparities exist in the treatment of people with headache disorders because of race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and geography, according to a review article published in the June 9, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1-Jun-2021 8:00 PM EDT
After 15 Years, Deep Brain Stimulation Still Effective in People with Parkinson’s
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Deep brain stimulation continues to be effective in people with Parkinson’s disease 15 years after the device is implanted, according to a study published in the June 2, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers found that compared to before deep brain stimulation, study participants continued to experience significant improvement in motor symptoms, which are symptoms that affect movement, as well as a reduction in medications 15 years later.

1-Jun-2021 8:05 PM EDT
Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Linked to Greater Dementia Risk in Type 1 Diabetes
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older people with type 1 diabetes who have been to the hospital at some point for both low and high blood sugar levels may be at six times greater risk for developing dementia years later. The research is published in the June 2, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that people with type 1 diabetes who visit the hospital for just one of the blood sugar extremes may also be at greater risk for developing dementia.

20-May-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Concussion with Loss of Consciousness May Be Linked to Life with Some Disability
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have had a concussion where they lost consciousness may be more likely to have some disability or limitations later in life—such as difficulty walking or limitations in the amount or type of work they can do—than people who have never had a concussion, according to a study published in the May 26, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

6-May-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Who Is Affected By Brain Pressure Disorder the Most?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Black and Hispanic women may be more likely than white women to have a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension, according to a study published in the May 12, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The disorder may also be more common in women who live in low-income areas or in areas with more fast-food restaurants and convenience stores than grocery stores, also known as “food swamps.”

Released: 6-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Care Protocol for Innovative Stroke Treatment at Hackensack Meridian Health JFK University Medical Center Published in Neurology Clinical Practice
Hackensack Meridian Health

A new treatment protocol that standardizes medical care for patients with acute stroke using an innovative clot-dissolving drug, has been reported by the stroke team at Hackensack Meridian JFK University Medical Center’s Stroke and Neurovascular Center at the Neuroscience Institute.

29-Apr-2021 1:15 PM EDT
Does Eating A Mediterranean Diet Protect Against Memory Loss and Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Eating a Mediterranean diet that is rich in fish, vegetables and olive oil may protect your brain from protein build up and shrinkage that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The research is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

29-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Reduced Kidney Function Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Chronic kidney disease is when a person’s kidneys progressively lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids. Now a new study has found that people with reduced kidney function may have an increased risk of developing dementia. The study is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

26-Apr-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Does Your Neighborhood Affect Your Stroke Recovery?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Stroke survivors who live in neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic status—areas with lower household income, education levels and occupational status—may have worse recovery three months after a stroke than people who live in neighborhoods with higher socioeconomic status, according to a study published in the April 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The findings applied to people with moderate to severe strokes, not people with mild strokes.

19-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Migraine Linked to Increased Risk of High Blood Pressure After Menopause
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Women who have migraine before menopause may have an increased risk of developing high blood pressure after menopause, according to a study published in the April 21, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

19-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Black, Hispanic Stroke Survivors More Likely to Have Changes in Brain’s Blood Vessels
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Intracerebral hemorrhage is a life-threatening type of stroke caused by bleeding within the brain tissue. Survivors are at high risk of having another bleeding stroke. Most of these strokes are caused by changes in the narrowest blood vessels in the brain, a condition known as cerebral small vessel disease. A new study has found that differences in the extent of one type of cerebral small vessel disease may contribute to differences in people’s risk for a second bleeding stroke. The research is published in the April 21, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Your Neighborhood May Affect Your Brain Health
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Study Finds Evidence of More Brain Aging in People Living in Disadvantaged Areas

25-Mar-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Exercise May Help Slow Cognitive Decline in Some People with Parkinson’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

For people with Parkinson’s disease, problems with thinking and memory skills are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of the disease. A new study shows that exercise may help slow cognitive decline for some people with the disease. The study is published in the March 31, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 31-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

19-Mar-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Leaky Blood-Brain Barrier Linked to Brain Tissue Damage in Brain Aging Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

As people age, changes in the tiniest blood vessels in the brain, a condition called cerebral small vessel disease, can lead to thinking and memory problems and stroke. These changes can also affect the blood-brain barrier, a layer of cells that protect the brain from toxins circulating in the blood. Now a new study has found that people with cerebral small vessel disease who have blood-brain barrier leakage had more brain tissue damage over two years than people with less blood-brain barrier leakage. The study is published in the March 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

19-Mar-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Doubling Down on Headache Pain
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

It’s not uncommon for people who experience a concussion to have moderate to severe headaches in the weeks after the injury. A new study has found a combination of two drugs, both common anti-nausea medications, given intravenously in the emergency room may relieve those headaches better than a placebo. The study is published in the March 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

12-Mar-2021 12:30 PM EST
Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Thinking Skills Decades Later
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People in their 20s and 30s who have health issues such as high blood pressure, obesity and high blood glucose levels may be more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills decades later than those without these health issues, according to a study published in the March 17, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

15-Mar-2021 4:00 PM EDT
New Criteria Published for Diagnosing the Clinical Syndrome of CTE During Life
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

For the first time, researchers have reached a consensus on the criteria for the clinical disorder associated with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology and its clinical manifestation during life – an important step in allowing scientists to fill knowledge gaps about the degenerative disease associated with a history of head impacts, such as contact sports and military service. This new consensus criteria was developed with the support of experts from the Uniformed Services University (USU) and was published March 15 in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

6-Mar-2021 6:30 PM EST
Medicare Paid 50% More for Neurology Drugs Over 5 Years While Claims Rose Only 8%
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study of Medicare payments has found that over a five-year period, the payments for medications prescribed to people with neurologic conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy increased by 50% while the number of claims for these prescription medications only rose by only 8%. The study is published in the March 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

6-Mar-2021 6:30 PM EST
Diet High in Healthful Plant-Based Food May Reduce Risk of Stroke by 10%
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Eating a healthy, plant-based diet that includes foods like vegetables, whole grains and beans, and decreasing intakes of less healthy foods like refined grains or added sugars may reduce your risk of having a stroke by up to 10%, according to a study published in the March 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found a diet high in quality plant-based foods may reduce your risk of having an ischemic stroke.

Newswise: Podcast - Persistent seizures: How to use the ketogenic diet for super-refractory status epilepticus
AUDIO
Released: 3-Mar-2021 8:45 AM EST
Podcast - Persistent seizures: How to use the ketogenic diet for super-refractory status epilepticus
International League Against Epilepsy

A recent paper in Neurology Clinical Practice offers practical considerations for using the ketogenic diet in patients with seizures that last more than 24 hours, a condition known as super-refractory status epilepticus. ILAE spoke with two of the authors – dietitian Neha Kaul and epileptologist Joshua Laing.

18-Feb-2021 12:45 PM EST
Does It Matter What Position You Play When It Comes to CTE?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Contrary to popular belief, a position played in collision sports like football and hockey may not raise an athlete’s risk for developing brain disease later, a new study finds. Researchers also found no link between the length of their career, and their risk of degenerative brain disease, according to a study published in the February 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Additionally, only about half of the athletes studied showed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

15-Feb-2021 8:30 AM EST
White Matter Changes in Brain Found in Frontotemporal Dementia
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Areas of brain damage called white matter hyperintensities are commonly linked to vascular health problems. They have also been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Now a new study has shown that white matter hyperintensities are also found in frontotemporal dementia. The study is published in the February 17, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Frontotemporal dementia, which often affects people under the age of 65, mainly results in changes in personality, behavior and problems with language rather than memory.

Released: 11-Feb-2021 12:05 PM EST
Heart Structure May Play Role in Stroke Risk Disparities Between Black and White People
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers have found that differences in the left atrium in the hearts of Black people and white people may play a role in risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the November 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

4-Feb-2021 5:00 PM EST
Can Strep Throat Make Tics Worse in Kids?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Exposure to the bacteria that causes strep throat does not appear to make Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders worse in children and teens, according to a study published in the February 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, exposure was associated with increased symptoms of . Previous studies have suggested a possible link between strep infection and tic and behavioral disorders.

4-Feb-2021 5:00 PM EST
Study Finds Fewer Older People Are Having Strokes
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study has found that people age 70 and older are having fewer strokes, and fewer people of all ages are dying from the disease. The study, which examined the population of Denmark, is published in the February 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

28-Jan-2021 4:50 PM EST
Moms with MS at No More Risk of Pregnancy Complications than Moms Without MS
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may not be at a higher risk of pregnancy complications like gestational diabetes, emergency cesarean section or stillbirth than women who do not have the disease, according to a study in the February 3, 2021, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the study did find that babies born to mothers with MS had a higher chance of being delivered by elective cesarean section (c-section) or induced delivery, and being small for their age compared to babies of women who did not have the disease.

25-Jan-2021 7:35 AM EST
Can Large Fluid-Filled Spaces in the Brain Help Identify Those at Risk of Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with enlarged fluid-filled spaces in the brain around small blood vessels may be more likely to develop cognitive problems and dementia over time than people without these enlarged spaces, according to a new study published in the January 27, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

15-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants May Provide Long-Term Benefit for People with MS
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment. Additionally, more than half of the people with the secondary progressive form of MS experienced no worsening of their symptoms 10 years after a transplant.

15-Jan-2021 5:00 PM EST
Brain Pressure Disorder that Causes Headache, Vision Problems on Rise
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk.

8-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
Memory May Be Preserved in Condition with Brain Changes Similar to Alzheimer’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by prominent language problems that worsen over time. About 40% of people with the condition have underlying Alzheimer’s disease. But a new study has found that people with the condition may not develop the memory problems associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in the January 13, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

18-Dec-2020 3:40 PM EST
People in Rural Areas Less Likely to Receive Specialty Care for Neurologic Conditions
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study has found that while the prevalence of neurologic conditions like dementia, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS) is consistent across the U.S., the distribution of neurologists is not, and people in more rural areas may be less likely to receive specialty care for certain neurologic conditions. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology, is published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

18-Dec-2020 3:45 PM EST
Neurology Patients Faced with Rising Out-of-Pocket Costs for Tests, Office Visits
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Just like with drug costs, the amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for diagnostic tests and office visits for neurologic conditions has risen over 15 years, according to a new study published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

18-Dec-2020 10:20 AM EST
Stroke and Altered Mental State Increase Risk of Death for COVID-19 Patients
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

People hospitalized with COVID-19 and neurological problems including stroke and confusion, have a higher risk of dying than other COVID-19 patients, according to a study published online today by researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the journal Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. These findings have the potential to identify and focus treatment efforts on individuals most at risk and could decrease COVID-19 deaths.

11-Dec-2020 1:15 PM EST
Study: Medication May Improve Thinking Skills in Advanced Multiple Sclerosis
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with the advanced form of multiple sclerosis (MS) called secondary progressive MS who took the drug siponimod for one to two years had improved cognitive processing speed compared to those who did not take the drug, according to a new study published in the December 16, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

3-Dec-2020 4:50 PM EST
Neurologic Complications Common Even in Moderate COVID-19 Cases
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

COVID-19 can lead to a broad range of neurologic complications including stroke, seizures, movement disorders, inflammatory diseases and more, even in moderate cases, according to a new study published in the December 9, 2020, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

3-Dec-2020 3:50 PM EST
Study: Smell, Taste Should Be Closely Monitored as First Signs of COVID-19 Infection
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Almost two-thirds of the people admitted to an Italian hospital with COVID-19 in March experienced losing their senses of smell and taste, according to a study published in the December 9, 2020, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Additionally, about 22% of those with impaired sense of smell and taste said it was their first symptom of infection.

19-Nov-2020 1:00 PM EST
Multiple Sclerosis May Not Put You at Risk for Breast, Colorectal Cancers
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) may not be at higher risk of developing two of the three cancers that occur most commonly in people with MS, breast and colorectal cancer, than people who don’t have the disease, according to a new study published in the November 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the study did find that people with MS had a higher incidence of bladder cancer.

19-Nov-2020 1:15 PM EST
Heart Structure May Play Role in Stroke Risk Disparities Between Black and White People
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers have found that differences in the left atrium in the hearts of Black people and white people may play a role in risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the November 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 24-Nov-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

12-Nov-2020 5:15 PM EST
Does Air Pollution Increase Women’s Risk of Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older women who live in locations with higher levels of air pollution may have more brain shrinkage, the kind seen in Alzheimer’s disease, than women who live in locations with lower levels, according to a new study published in the November 18, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at fine particle pollution and found that breathing in high levels of this kind of air pollution was linked to shrinkage in the areas of the brain vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease.

5-Nov-2020 4:35 PM EST
Does Race and Ethnicity Play a Role in Restless Legs Syndrome in Pregnant Women?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers looked at whether race and ethnicity plays a role in instances of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in pregnant women in a new study published in the November 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

5-Nov-2020 5:40 PM EST
Study Suggests Brain Injuries May Evolve, Not Resolve, Over Time
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Service members with concussions may have symptoms that continue to evolve up to five years after the initial injury, according to a study published in the November 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The findings challenge the idea that these individuals with chronic brain injuries maintain a relatively stable course of recovery.

30-Oct-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Married, Single, Kids or Not, Participating in Workforce May Protect Women’s Memory
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Women who work in the paid labor force in early adulthood and middle age may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay, according to a new study published in the November 4, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers found an association between working for pay and slower memory decline regardless of a woman’s marital or parenthood status.

Newswise: Study highlights link between depressive symptoms and stroke risk
Released: 29-Oct-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Study highlights link between depressive symptoms and stroke risk
University of Alabama at Birmingham

People with multiple depressive symptoms have an increased risk for stroke, with new findings showing that individuals who scored higher on a test designed to measure depressive symptoms had a higher stroke risk than those with lower scores.

Released: 27-Oct-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Study Raises Questions About Role of Leisure Activity in Dementia
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The researchers also found that some people who are later diagnosed with dementia stop participating in leisure activities years before they are diagnosed. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 27-Oct-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Antiseizure Medication in Pregnancy Associated with Twice the Risk of Autism in Child
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Women with epilepsy who take the antiseizure drug valproic acid while pregnant are at more than double the risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder and nearly double the risk of having children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: 246630_web.jpg
Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Immune response the probable underlying cause of neural damage in COVID-19
University of Gothenburg

It is probably the immune response to, rather than the virus in itself, that causes sudden confusion and other symptoms from the nervous system in some patients with COVID-19. This is shown by a study of cases involving six Swedish patients, now published in the journal Neurology.


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