Feature Channels: Nutrition

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10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Does Eating Fish Protect Our Brains from Air Pollution?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older women who eat more than one to two servings a week of baked or broiled fish or shellfish may consume enough omega-3 fatty acids to counteract the effects of air pollution on the brain, according to a new study published in the July 15, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: How long should you fast for weight loss?
Released: 15-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
How long should you fast for weight loss?
University of Illinois at Chicago

Two daily fasting diets, also known as time-restricted feeding diets, are effective for weight loss, according to a new study. The study reported results from a clinical trial that compared a 4-hour time-restricted feeding diet and a 6-hour time-restricted feeding diet to a control group.

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Released: 14-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Pesticide mixtures a bigger problem than previously thought
University of Queensland

New research led by The University of Queensland has provided the first comprehensive analysis of pesticide mixtures in creeks and rivers discharging to the Great Barrier Reef.

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Embargo will expire: 20-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Jul-2020 8:25 AM EDT

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Newswise: Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
Released: 13-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
University of California, Irvine

A compound commonly found in pickled capers has been shown to activate proteins required for normal human brain and heart activity, and may even lead to future therapies for the treatment of epilepsy and abnormal heart rhythms.

Newswise: Perceiving the Flavor of Fat: Monell Center Twins Study Finds Genetic Variation Shapes Individual Perception of Fatty Foods
Released: 13-Jul-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Perceiving the Flavor of Fat: Monell Center Twins Study Finds Genetic Variation Shapes Individual Perception of Fatty Foods
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Liking of fatty food is more complex than its fat content alone – it could also be related to inborn genetic traits of the consumer related to fat perception.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:25 AM EDT
What happens when food first touches your tongue
Ohio State University

New research explains why humans register taste more quickly when food or drink moves over their tongues quickly, as compared to when they are held in their mouth steadily.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
In Firefighter Trainees, ‘Mediterranean Lifestyle’ Linked to Lower Health Risks
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Young firefighter recruits who follow a ‘Mediterranean lifestyle’ are less likely to have hypertension (high blood pressure) and more likely to have good aerobic fitness, reports a study in the July Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Healthier School Food and Physical Activity Environments Matter for Childhood Obesity
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

School food choices and number of physical activity facilities are associated with students’ BMI, Rutgers study finds

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Higher Manganese Levels in Early Pregnancy Linked to Lower Preeclampsia Risk
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An analysis of data from more than 1,300 women followed prospectively through pregnancy found that women with lower levels of the essential mineral manganese in early pregnancy were more likely to develop the serious high blood pressure syndrome called preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

Newswise: Plant-Based Diets Support Healthy Testosterone Levels
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Plant-Based Diets Support Healthy Testosterone Levels
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Men who follow plant-based diets have testosterone levels that are basically the same as the levels in men who eat meat, a study shows. This finding dispels a widespread notion that men need large amounts of animal protein in order to support healthy levels of this hormone.

Newswise: The HSUS Announces Forward Food Collaborative Webinar for Food Service: The plant-based solution to a global pandemic
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
The HSUS Announces Forward Food Collaborative Webinar for Food Service: The plant-based solution to a global pandemic
Monday Campaigns

Speakers from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Informed Sustainability Consulting, and Meatless Monday will explore how plant-based menu items can assist food service dining operations during these challenging times.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Premier nutrition education conference offers free registration for media
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

The Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior is offering members of the media free registration to its 53rd Annual Conference “What Food Future?” held entirely online from July 20 – 24.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Study: Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts
University of Texas at Dallas

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Oat and rye bran fibres alter gut microbiota, reducing weight gain and hepatic inflammation
University of Eastern Finland

In a newly published experimental study, the consumption of dietary fibre from oat and rye brans supported the growth of beneficial gut microbiota, which in turn ameliorated cholesterol metabolism, enhanced gut barrier function and reduced hepatic inflammation.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
In mouse study, black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation
Ohio State University

Eating black raspberries might reduce inflammation associated with skin allergies, a new study indicates.

Newswise: Putting zinc on Bread Wheat Leaves
Released: 2-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Putting zinc on Bread Wheat Leaves
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Applying zinc to the leaves of bread wheat can increase wheat grain zinc concentrations and improve its nutritional content.

Newswise: Number of Hospitalizations Can Be Important Clinical Indicator for Head, Neck Cancer Patients
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Number of Hospitalizations Can Be Important Clinical Indicator for Head, Neck Cancer Patients
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patients who were unexpectedly hospitalized for dehydration, fever or other ailments while undergoing radiation treatment for head and neck cancers were at a higher risk for less favorable outcomes, a new study from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center reports.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Raw milk may do more harm than good
University of California, Davis

Raw or unpasteurized cows' milk from U.S. retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis.

Newswise: University of Miami Study Finds Dietary Changes May Help People with Ulcerative Colitis
Released: 29-Jun-2020 6:05 PM EDT
University of Miami Study Finds Dietary Changes May Help People with Ulcerative Colitis
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

A new study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology led by Maria T. Abreu, M.D., professor of medicine and professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, found that eating diets low in fat and high in fiber may improve the quality of life of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) — even those in remission.

Newswise: Weight stigma can be harmful to many, including marginalized identities
Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Weight stigma can be harmful to many, including marginalized identities
University of Georgia

Weight-inclusive care prioritizes well-being over weight and having access to non-stigmatizing health care.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Nutrition a key ingredient for cognitive health of midlife and older Canadians
University of Toronto

A new study, investigating factors associated with verbal fluency among a large sample of anglophone Canadians aged 45-85, found that individuals who consumed more vegetables and fruits and more nuts and pulses (such as lentils and beans) scored higher on tests of verbal fluency.

Newswise: American Cancer Society Updates Guidelines for Cancer Prevention
Released: 24-Jun-2020 1:40 PM EDT
American Cancer Society Updates Guidelines for Cancer Prevention
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

The American Cancer Society recently updated its nutrition and physical activity guidelines for cancer prevention. These updates focus on increasing physical activity and developing healthy eating patterns at every age, with an emphasis on maintaining a healthy body weight through all stages of life.

Released: 22-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Urine test reveals quality of your diet -- and whether it's the best fit for your body
Imperial College London

Scientists have completed large-scale tests on a new type of five-minute urine test that measures the health of a person's diet, and produces an individual's unique urine 'fingerprint'.

Released: 22-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Earth Challenge 2020: Calling on citizens to help support global food supply
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new app widget provides citizens with an opportunity to get involved in one of the world’s most challenging problems: how to provide enough, high quality, nutritious food to the ever expanding global population.

Released: 19-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Anxiety, Job Loss Are Leading to Widespread Sleep Deprivation
Drink HRW

The COVID19 pandemic is creating unprecedented levels of sleep deprivation, presenting a significant risk to our mental and physical health. Now, a new randomized controlled cross-over pilot trial published online today in Neurophysiology explains that high doses of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) are just as effective as caffeine in raising alertness in sleep deprived men and women. Importantly, this research is the first of its kind to show that hydrogen water and caffeine had an impact on different domains of alertness. Specifically, the study results demonstrate that; hydrogen improves orienting to sensory stimulation, while caffeine alters awareness and executive attention that refers to the ability to control our attention and ongoing cognitive processes, including thoughts and feelings.

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Released: 17-Jun-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Bouillon fortified with a new iron compound could help reduce iron deficiency
Chalmers Technology Institute

Iron fortification of food is a cost-effective method of preventing iron deficiency. But finding iron compounds that are easily absorbed by the intestine without compromising food quality is a major challenge.

Newswise: Wildlife Supply Chains for Human Consumption Increase Coronaviruses’ Spillover Risk to People
Released: 17-Jun-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Wildlife Supply Chains for Human Consumption Increase Coronaviruses’ Spillover Risk to People
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study found that animals sampled in the wildlife-trade supply chain bound for human consumption had high proportions of coronaviruses, and that the proportion of positives significantly increases as animals travel from traders, to large markets, to restaurants.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Memorial Sloan Kettering Awards & Appointments
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces its most recent awards and appointments for the institution’s physicians, scientists, nurses, and staff.

Newswise: Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age
Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age
Tufts University

A new, multi-ethnic study from researchers at Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center found adults aged 54-76 with low circulating vitamin K levels were more likely to die within 13 years compared to those with adequate levels, suggesting vitamin K may offer protective health benefits as we age.

Newswise: From Seed to Supermarket: What Does It Take to Put Produce on Your Plate?
Released: 11-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
From Seed to Supermarket: What Does It Take to Put Produce on Your Plate?
Cornell University

Innovative plant breeders at Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences are creating new fruits and vegetables that wow consumers, have longer growing seasons and are more resistant to diseases, insects and weather.

Newswise: Adult Stem Cell Study Shows Fish Oil May Help with Depression
Released: 11-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Adult Stem Cell Study Shows Fish Oil May Help with Depression
University of Illinois at Chicago

A study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that patient-derived adult stem cells can be used to model major depressive disorder and test how a patient may respond to medication and that fish oil, when tested in the model, created an antidepressant response.

Newswise: Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Cornell University

Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

8-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
People Who Eat a Late Dinner May Gain Weight
Endocrine Society

Eating a late dinner may contribute to weight gain and high blood sugar, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Newswise:Video Embedded could-these-salt-loving-edible-sea-vegetables-be-the-new-kale
VIDEO
Released: 11-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Could These ‘Salt-loving’ Edible Sea Vegetables be the New Kale?
Florida Atlantic University

Skip the salt! Three species of sea vegetables could just be the new kale with the added benefit of a salty flavor. The 10-week study was designed to determine the optimal growing conditions for these sea vegetables that could soon be a great addition to salads, soups, pasta, rice and other dishes in the continental U.S. These nutritious plants for human consumption do not require fresh water and instead are grown in salt water.

Newswise: Obesity Patients Report Health Challenges During Shelter in Place
Released: 11-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Obesity Patients Report Health Challenges During Shelter in Place
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Shelter-in-place orders to reduce the spread of COVID-19 put unusual strains on people with obesity, making it more difficult for them to eat properly and manage their weight, according to a UT Southwestern study.

Released: 9-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Female Athletes at Risk for Nutritional Deficiencies
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Lack of proper nutrition education may affect female athletes’ performance and long-term health, says Rutgers researcher

Released: 9-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Missing Sodium-channel Component May Protect against Diet-induced Artery Stiffening
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research in mice finds that deficiency in one small component of a signaling pathway may protect against artery stiffening and subsequent kidney disease associated with a high-fat, high-sugar diet.

Newswise: National Calorie Menu Labeling Law Could Add Years of Healthy Living, Save Billions
Released: 9-Jun-2020 9:30 AM EDT
National Calorie Menu Labeling Law Could Add Years of Healthy Living, Save Billions
Tufts University

The national law requiring calorie labeling on menus at large chain restaurants is estimated to prevent tens of thousands of new heart disease and type 2 diabetes cases—and save thousands of lives—in just five years, according to a new study that estimates the law’s impact.

2-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Premier nutrition education conference goes virtual in 2020
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Distinguished nutrition educators from around the world will gather in a truly global event this summer as the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior hosts its 53rd Annual Conference entirely online.

28-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Leaders Call for ‘Moonshot’ on Nutrition Research
American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Leading nutrition and food policy experts outline a bold case for strengthening federal nutrition research in a live interactive session as part of NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a virtual conference hosted by the American Society for Nutrition (ASN).

Released: 2-Jun-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Exercise Maintains Blood Vessel Health in Men after Sugary Beverage Consumption
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study finds that regular exercise can offset the blood vessel impairment that occurs after drinking sugary soft drinks. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Newswise: Pre-COVID-19 poll of older adults hints at potential impact of pandemic on their eating habits
29-May-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Pre-COVID-19 poll of older adults hints at potential impact of pandemic on their eating habits
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Most people in their 50s and older were capable home cooks just before COVID-19 struck America, but only 5% had ordered groceries online, according to a new national poll. The cooking skills that enabled half of older adults to eat dinner at home six or seven days a week may have served them well during the height of the pandemic, the poll suggests. However, they may need added support for grocery shopping as the pandemic continues and older adults seek to avoid COVID-19.

Newswise:Video Embedded climate-change-an-imminent-threat-to-glass-sponge-reefs
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge reefs
University of British Columbia

Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new UBC research.


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