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Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Hot flushes and night sweats linked to 70% increase in cardiovascular disease
University of Queensland

New research from The University of Queensland has found that women who have hot flushes and night sweats after menopause are 70 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, angina and strokes.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
New study confirms high prevalence of depression during the menopause transition
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Depression has been shown to be prevalent during menopause, affecting as many as 70% of women transitioning into menopause

Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
For the First Time, Study Identifies Time Trends in Pregnancy-Related Outcomes Among American Women with Type 1 Diabetes
Joslin Diabetes Center

Largest US database of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes provides a first-time, big picture view of mother’s health, and neonatal and delivery outcomes. The analysis found a threefold increase in insulin pump use at the end of the study period, compared to the start of the study, but A1c levels remained steady across the 13-year period. Over time the study showed a trend toward pre-pregnancy obesity and unhealthy maternal weight gain.

Newswise: More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:05 PM EDT
More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
University of South Australia

Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl – one of the pain relief drugs used during labour– on both mother and baby.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
To Support Lactating Emergency Physicians, Consider These Strategies
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians.

Newswise:Video Embedded ohio-state-study-exercise-increases-benefits-of-breastmilk-for-babies
VIDEO
Released: 29-Jun-2020 7:30 PM EDT
Ohio State Study: Exercise Increases Benefits Of Breastmilk For Babies
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine finds even moderate exercise during pregnancy increases a compound in breast milk that reduces a baby’s lifelong risks of serious health issues such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

Newswise: WFIRM Scientists Prove Bioengineered Uteri Support Pregnancy
25-Jun-2020 1:00 PM EDT
WFIRM Scientists Prove Bioengineered Uteri Support Pregnancy
Wake Forest Baptist Health

WFIRM scientists were able to show that bioengineered uteri in an animal model developed the native tissue-like structures needed to support normal reproductive function.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
At-Risk Twin Pregnancies Benefit from an Intervention Called Cerclage
Thomas Jefferson University

New evidence upturns long-held medical practice, showing the efficacy of an intervention to prevent premature labor and miscarriage for mothers carrying twins.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Use of continuous combined oral contraceptives demonstrates bone health benefits
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

omen with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) become estrogen deficient at an early age, which makes them more vulnerable to the loss of bone mineral density.

Newswise: Tiny molecule could protect newborns from brain damage
Released: 23-Jun-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Tiny molecule could protect newborns from brain damage
University of South Australia

New findings from Australian and Chinese researchers could hold the key to preventing brain damage in newborn infants who are deprived of oxygen at birth.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Defining Paths to Possible Mother to Child Coronavirus Transmission
UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health physicians defined the conditions of coronavirus transmission from mother to baby during pregnancy and delivery.

Released: 17-Jun-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Maternal obesity linked to increased risk of early-onset neonatal sepsis
University of Michigan

The risk of early-onset neonatal bacterial sepsis increases with maternal obesity, according to a new study of University of Michigan and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

Newswise: NYU Langone Hospital-Brooklyn Receives Prestigious Baby-Friendly Designation
Released: 17-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
NYU Langone Hospital-Brooklyn Receives Prestigious Baby-Friendly Designation
NYU Langone Hospital - Brooklyn

NYU Langone Hospital–Brooklyn has achieved the prestigious international Baby-Friendly designation following years of quality improvements and a rigorous review process.

Newswise: Persistent DNA damage in the placenta affects pregnancy outcomes
15-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Persistent DNA damage in the placenta affects pregnancy outcomes
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have shown that a dysfunctional placenta can play a previously unrecognized role during the earliest stages of development in mouse models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. People with this rare genetic disorder often harbor mutations in cohesins, ring-like proteins that help DNA organize and repair itself.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Maternal transmission of COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, study finds
University of Nottingham

Transmission of COVID-19 from mother to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, and the rate of infection is no greater when the baby is born vaginally, breastfed or allowed contact with the mother, according to a new study.

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Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Intelligence (IQ) throughout childhood to adulthood is impacted if born small for gestational age
University of Warwick

People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development from infancy to adulthood

Released: 8-Jun-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Pregnancy Complications in Assisted Reproduction Linked to a Specific Process
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

An experimental study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania links a specific procedure – embryo culture – that is part of the assisted reproduction process (ART) to placental abnormalities, risk for preeclampsia, and abnormal fetal growth. The team, led by Marisa Bartolemei, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, published their findings today in Development.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Newly Discovered Hormone Could Adjust Thirst Levels
American Physiological Society (APS)

A newly discovered hormone called phoenixin could play a major role in adjusting a person’s level of thirst to the body’s needs.

29-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study finds PFAS exposure may cause early menopause in women
Endocrine Society

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure may cause menopause to occur two years earlier in women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Newswise: Artificial Tissue Used to Research Uterine Contractions
28-May-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Artificial Tissue Used to Research Uterine Contractions
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Throughout an individual’s lifetime, the uterus undergoes spontaneous contractions of the uterine wall, which can induce uterine peristalsis, a specific wavelike contraction pattern. These contractions are important for many reproductive processes, but hyperperistalsis could impede fertility and lead to diseases, such as adenomyosis or endometriosis. In an APL Bioengineering article, researchers present two mechanobiology tools for experiments on synthetic or artificial uterine tissue. They wanted to study the negative effects of hyperperistalsis.

Newswise:Video Embedded at-home-screening-for-ovarian-breast-cancers-is-effective
VIDEO
Released: 28-May-2020 11:30 AM EDT
At-home screening for ovarian, breast cancers is effective
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

At-home genetic-testing kits for breast and ovarian cancer risk are just as effective, and in some cases even more so, than the typical protocol for genetic testing, which requires repeated office visits and counseling, according to a study led by UW Medicine researchers.

Newswise: Exposure to ‘good bacteria’ during pregnancy buffers risk of autism-like syndrome in offspring
Released: 27-May-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Exposure to ‘good bacteria’ during pregnancy buffers risk of autism-like syndrome in offspring
University of Colorado Boulder

Inoculation with a beneficial microorganism during pregnancy fended off an autism-like syndrome in offspring, according to a new animal study. The paper is the latest to suggest that 'good bacteria' impacts the brain.

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Released: 26-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Even natural products can be harmful for the unborn child
University of Bern

Plant products ingested by pregnant women through their diet are broken down by the intestinal microbiota into chemical substances, some of which can cross the placental barrier and reach the fetus.

Newswise: 232723_web.jpg
Released: 22-May-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Placentas from COVID-19-positive pregnant women show injury
Northwestern University

he placentas from 16 women who tested positive for COVID-19 while pregnant showed evidence of injury, according to pathological exams completed directly following birth, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

Released: 22-May-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Google search data reveals American's concerns about abortion
University of California, Berkeley

Residents of states with limited access to contraceptives and high rates of unplanned pregnancies are more likely to turn to the internet for information about abortion.

19-May-2020 7:15 AM EDT
Blood Spot Screening Shows Promise for Identifying Newborns Affected by Prenatal Alcohol Exposure
Research Society on Alcoholism

A simple screening test could help identify infants at risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), according to a report in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Prenatal exposure to alcohol can cause a wide range of lifelong physical, behavioral, and cognitive disabilities, encompassed by the umbrella term FASD. Identifying babies at risk for FASD has previously relied on maternal self-reports of drinking in pregnancy; however, this can be unreliable, as women may under-report their drinking because of recall bias or fear of stigma. Recently, biological markers have been identified that can provide more objective data on prenatal alcohol exposure and supplement information from maternal self-reports. One such biomarker, phosphatidylethanol (PEth), is a direct marker of alcohol metabolism that can indicate exposure with a high level of accuracy, and can be simply measured in newborns (and their mothers) using minimally invasive methods.

Released: 21-May-2020 5:55 PM EDT
July AJPH Issue
American Public Health Association (APHA)

Therapies to change people’s sexual preference cause suicidal ideation, Georgia law effective at reducing late-term abortions and more

Newswise: Low Rate of COVID-19 Found in Women Admitted for Childbirth at Cedars-Sinai
Released: 20-May-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Low Rate of COVID-19 Found in Women Admitted for Childbirth at Cedars-Sinai
Cedars-Sinai

A study conducted by investigators at Cedars-Sinai suggests that universal testing of asymptomatic pregnant women in labor may not be necessary at every hospital. The investigation was prompted by reports from several large hospitals in New York City that nearly 14% of asymptomatic women admitted for childbirth had tested positive for COVID-19 during the early weeks of the pandemic. The women did not know they were infected.

Newswise: RNA Molecules in Maternal Blood May Predict Pregnancies at Risk for Preeclampsia
Released: 19-May-2020 12:30 PM EDT
RNA Molecules in Maternal Blood May Predict Pregnancies at Risk for Preeclampsia
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers have identified small molecules in the blood of asymptomatic pregnant women that may predict risk for preeclampsia, responsible for a significant proportion of maternal and neonatal deaths, low birth weight and is a primary cause of premature birth.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-19-raises-risk-for-women-who-are-obese-and-pregnant
VIDEO
Released: 15-May-2020 4:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 raises risk for women who are obese and pregnant
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

Study findings suggest that women who contract the virus face a higher incidence of a severe pneumonia, which could lead to preterm birth.

Released: 15-May-2020 11:05 AM EDT
New Study Finds Nutritional Supplement Jubilance Relieves PMS Mood Symptoms
Terra Biological LLC

Jubilance, containing Oxaloacetate (OAA), shown to improve PMS anxiety and gloominess by more than 50% in peer-reviewed clinical trial

Released: 14-May-2020 7:20 AM EDT
Elizabeth Howell, MD, MPP, Named New Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Penn Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

PHILADELPHIA – Elizabeth Howell, MD, MPP, an accomplished researcher of health inequities and a respected women’s health leader, has been named chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She will join Penn on Sept. 1, 2020, from her post as a professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Released: 13-May-2020 5:05 PM EDT
In Memoriam: Laurie Schwab Zabin, 1926-2020
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Laurie Schwab Zabin, PhD, a professor of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an internationally recognized expert on adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and sexual behavior, died Monday.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 12-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

The following are various story ideas regarding the COVID-19 illness. To interview experts in these tips or others at Johns Hopkins, contact JHMedia@jhmi.edu.

Released: 11-May-2020 4:15 PM EDT
COVID-19 places added prenatal stress on mother and child that could have lasting impact
McGill University

An international consortium of researchers has identified particular sources of prenatal stress, as experienced by mothers, that have a direct effect on a child's subsequent mental health.

Released: 11-May-2020 11:25 AM EDT
BIDMC’s Research & Health News Digest – COVID-19 Special Edition
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A monthly roundup of research briefs showcasing recent scientific advances led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center faculty.

Newswise: Individualized mosaics of microbial strains transfer from the maternal to the infant gut
Released: 8-May-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Individualized mosaics of microbial strains transfer from the maternal to the infant gut
University of Alabama at Birmingham

A microbiome “fingerprint” method shows that an individualized mosaic of microbial strains is transmitted to the infant gut microbiome from a mother giving vaginal birth. The study analyzed existing metagenomic databases of fecal samples from mother-infant pairs and used a germfree mouse model.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Released: 7-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Released: 7-May-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Diabetes Drug May Protect Breastfed Children from Future Metabolic Disorder
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests that treating a breastfeeding parent with a common diabetes drug may provide male offspring lifelong protection against diabetes and obesity. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism. It was chosen as an APSselect article for May.

Newswise: Survey: Half of Americans Concerned About New Moms and Babies Being in Public Places
6-May-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Survey: Half of Americans Concerned About New Moms and Babies Being in Public Places
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

There are a lot of health concerns that come with pregnancy, and the COVID-19 pandemic has created additional fears about risks for both mom and baby. A new national survey conducted by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center confirms these fears, finding that nearly 80% of respondents would be concerned about themselves or an expectant mother in their life in the midst of the current COVID-19 outbreak, with almost half expressing fear of going to a scheduled prenatal appointment.

29-Apr-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Neighborhood Racial and Economic Polarization, Hospital of Delivery, and Severe Maternal Morbidity
Mount Sinai Health System

How neighborhood racial and economic spatial polarization, an extreme form of residential segregation, influences maternal health.

Released: 4-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
New study predicts impact of COVID-19 on labor and delivery in the United States
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

In a study published online in the journal American College of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM, physician-researchers from UH Cleveland Medical Center and Georgia State University project 52 COVID-19 related maternal mortalities in the United States this year.

Released: 29-Apr-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Exercise and Food Reward, Baby Steps for Mother’s Cardiovascular Health and more from Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

If you're looking for health and fitness story ideas, view these research highlights from ACSM’s flagship research journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®.

Released: 28-Apr-2020 12:15 PM EDT
COVID-19 and pregnancies: What we know
Midwestern University

Amid the rapidly evolving global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that has already had profound effects on public health and medical infrastructure across the globe, many questions remain about its impact on child health.

Released: 28-Apr-2020 10:05 AM EDT
COVID-19 and Pregnancy
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

BIDMC’s Blair Wylie, MD, MPH, Director of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and Chloe Zera, MD, MPH, Director of Obstetric Population Health, provide some information and advice for expecting parents.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Breastfeeding moms’ exposure to nicotine linked to infant skull defect
Ohio State University

Lactating mothers who use e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies may be putting their breastfed babies at risk for skull defects, a new study in animals suggests.


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