Feature Channels: Parkinson’s Disease

Filters close
Newswise: Researchers pioneer early diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s
Released: 7-Jul-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Researchers pioneer early diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers are pioneering a new method to more accurately diagnose Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative brain disorder which affects around 10 million people worldwide, resulting in a loss of control of body movements.

26-Jun-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Does Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Increase Risk of Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

There’s good news for people with Parkinson’s disease. A new study shows that deep brain stimulation may not increase the risk of developing dementia. The study is published in the July 1, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 7:55 AM EDT
Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington’s and other diseases
University of Bristol

Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background.

Newswise: Poseidon Innovation Announces Funding for Three UC San Diego Researchers
Released: 26-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Poseidon Innovation Announces Funding for Three UC San Diego Researchers
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego and Deerfield Management created Poseidon Innovation to support researchers working to advance disease-curing therapeutics by funding early stage projects and expediting the drug-development cycle. Poseidon announces it is funding three researchers.

Newswise: One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
18-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice’s Parkinson’s disease symptoms disappear.

16-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Star-Shaped Brain Cells May Play a Critical Role in Glaucoma
NYU Langone Health

After a brain injury, cells that normally nourish nerves may actually kill them instead, a new study in rodents finds. This “reactive” phenomenon may be the driving factor behind neurodegenerative diseases like glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness.

Newswise: New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue
Released: 22-Jun-2020 6:50 PM EDT
New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA scientists have developed a method for restoring oxygen-consumption activity to previously frozen mitochondria samples. By speeding up research, investigators hope to accelerate the diagnosis of people living with mitochondrial diseases and secondary disorders in which mitochondria play a key role, including diseases related to aging, metabolism and the heart.

Newswise: The Parkinson’s disease gut has an overabundance of opportunistic pathogens
Released: 18-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
The Parkinson’s disease gut has an overabundance of opportunistic pathogens
University of Alabama at Birmingham

A 2003 hypothesis says Parkinson’s disease is caused by a gut pathogen that could spread to the brain through the nervous system. No evidence was found until now; researchers report for the first time a significant overabundance of a cluster of opportunistic pathogens in the PD gut.

Newswise: 235148_web.jpg
Released: 18-Jun-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Antioxidant agent may prevent chronic kidney disease and Parkinson's disease
Osaka University

Oxidative stress is the result of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and can be damaging to cells and tissues.

Newswise: Advanced MRI Scans May Improve Treatment of Tremor, Parkinson’s Disease
12-Jun-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Advanced MRI Scans May Improve Treatment of Tremor, Parkinson’s Disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 14, 2020 – Recently developed MRI techniques used to more precisely target a small area in the brain linked to Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor may lead to better outcomes without surgery and with less risk of negative effects, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests.

Newswise: Viewing Dopamine Receptors in Their Native Habitat
9-Jun-2020 5:00 PM EDT
Viewing Dopamine Receptors in Their Native Habitat
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 11, 2020 – Dopamine, a chemical that sends messages between different parts of the brain and body, plays a key role in a variety of diseases and behaviors by interacting with receptors on cells. But despite their importance in physiology and pathology, the structure of these receptors embedded in a phospholipid membrane – their natural environment on the cell surface – was unknown. A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane.

19-May-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Blood Test May Help Predict Whose MS Will Get Worse
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A blood test may help predict which people with multiple sclerosis (MS) will get worse during the following year, according to a study published in the May 20, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Scientists find evidence of link between diesel exhaust, risk of Parkinson’s
Released: 19-May-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Scientists find evidence of link between diesel exhaust, risk of Parkinson’s
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new UCLA study in zebrafish has identified the process by which air pollution can damage brain cells, potentially contributing to Parkinson’s disease.

Newswise: Protein Shapes Matter in Alzheimer's Research
Released: 19-May-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Protein Shapes Matter in Alzheimer's Research
Michigan Technological University

Even small changes may have big, long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity.

Newswise: Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
11-May-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Loma Linda University Health have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury—a first-ever “biomarker” for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve efficacy. The study was published in Cell Reports.

Released: 1-May-2020 5:40 PM EDT
ARN Board Member Maureen Musto Selected for Development Group Working on the World Health Organization “Rehabilitation 2030” Initiative
Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

The Association of Rehabilitation Nurses is proud to announce that ARN Board Member Maureen Musto, MS RN APRN-CNS ACNS-BC CRRN, has been selected to serve on the Development Group for Traumatic Brain Injury and Parkinson’s Disease working on development of the World Health Organization (WHO) Rehabilitation Programme’s Package of Interventions for Rehabilitation (PRI).

Newswise: New research gives further evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson’s disease
17-Apr-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New research gives further evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson’s disease
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study co-led by scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) adds increasing evidence that Parkinson’s disease is partly an autoimmune disease. In fact, the researchers report that signs of autoimmunity can appear in Parkinson’s disease patients years before their official diagnosis.

Newswise: Brain discovery suggests source of lifelong behavioral issues
Released: 8-Apr-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Brain discovery suggests source of lifelong behavioral issues
University of Virginia Health System

Improper removal of faulty brain cells during neurodevelopment may cause lifelong behavioral issues, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. The finding also could have important implications for a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Released: 3-Apr-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Patients with Parkinson's disease face unique 'hidden sorrows' related to the COVID-19
IOS Press

Experts writing in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease discuss potentially grave consequences for Parkinson's disease patients related to social distancing, but also opportunities like new avenues for research and initiatives that may offer positive help and support

27-Mar-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Study: Therapy by Phone Is Effective for Depression in People with Parkinson’s
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Depression is common in people with Parkinson’s disease and contributes to faster physical and mental decline, but it is often overlooked and undertreated. The good news is that participating in cognitive-behavioral therapy by telephone may be effective in reducing depression symptoms for people with Parkinson’s, according to a study published in the April 1, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

1-Apr-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Managing Negative Thoughts Helps Combat Depression in Parkinson’s Patients
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

People with Parkinson’s disease who engage in cognitive behavioral therapy — a form of psychotherapy that increases awareness of negative thinking and teaches coping skills — are more likely to overcome depression and anxiety, according to a Rutgers study.

Released: 17-Mar-2020 9:40 AM EDT
University of Kentucky Research Could Help Predict Progression of Parkinson's Disease
University of Kentucky

Researchers from the University of Kentucky’s College of Medicine are leading a clinical study that could provide a promising new method for early detection of Parkinson’s disease.

Newswise: ‘Natural killer’ cells could halt Parkinson’s progression
Released: 16-Mar-2020 2:10 PM EDT
‘Natural killer’ cells could halt Parkinson’s progression
University of Georgia

Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and their colleagues have found that “natural killer” white blood cells could guard against the cascade of cellular changes that lead to Parkinson’s disease and help stop its progression.

Released: 12-Mar-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Let's Dance: FSU researchers investigate how tango may help Parkinson's patients
Florida State University

Parkinson’s disease takes a lot from its victims.Patients often notice its onset as a tremor in one of their hands. As it progresses, it can impair balance, change speech patterns, alter thinking and dramatically affect movement.There is no cure, but there are ways to improve symptoms.

6-Mar-2020 4:05 PM EST
Vision Problems May Be Common in People with Parkinson’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Vision and eye problems like blurry vision, dry eyes, trouble with depth perception, and problems adjusting to rapid changes in light are much more common in people with Parkinson’s disease than in people without the disorder, according to a study published in the March 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found such problems can influence a person’s daily activities.

Newswise: OPM.jpg
Released: 10-Mar-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Patient-friendly brain imager gets green light toward first prototype
Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories has received a $6 million grant from the the National Institutes of Health to build a prototype medical device that would make magnetoencephalography (MEG) — a type of noninvasive brain scan — more comfortable, more accessible and potentially more accurate.

24-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST
Can Boxing Improve Quality of Life for People with Parkinson’s Disease?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with Parkinson’s disease who participate in a special, non-contact boxing program may have better quality of life and be more likely to exercise than those who do not participate, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

Released: 2-Mar-2020 7:45 AM EST
‘Brain Surfing’: Ultrasound waves focused on prefrontal cortex elevate mood and change brain connectivity in human volunteers
Center for Consciousness Studies, University of Arizona

A team of researchers at the University of Arizona has found that low-intensity ultrasound waves directed at a particular region of the brain’s prefrontal cortex in healthy subjects can elevate mood, and decrease connectivity in a brain network that has been shown to be hyperactive in psychiatric disorders. The method uses transcranial focused ultrasound (‘tFUS’), a painless, non-invasive technique to modulate brain function comparable to transcranial magnetic stimulation (‘TMS’), and transcranial direct current stimulation (‘tDCS’). This study shows, for the first time, a correlation between tFUS-induced mood enhancement, and reorganization of brain circuits.

Released: 27-Feb-2020 12:20 PM EST
Cells carrying Parkinson’s mutation could lead to new model for studying disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Parkinson’s disease researchers have used gene-editing tools to introduce the disorder’s most common genetic mutation into marmoset monkey stem cells and to successfully tamp down cellular chemistry that often goes awry in Parkinson’s patients.

24-Feb-2020 10:05 AM EST
Study Finds Picking up a Pingpong Paddle May Benefit People with Parkinson’s
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Pingpong may hold promise as a possible form of physical therapy for Parkinson’s disease. People with Parkinson’s who participated in a pingpong exercise program once a week for six months showed improvement in their Parkinson’s symptoms, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

14-Feb-2020 1:45 PM EST
As Out-of-Pocket Costs for Neurologic Medications Rise, People Less Likely to Take Them
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

As out-of-pocket costs go up for drugs for the neurologic disorders Alzheimer’s disease, peripheral neuropathy and Parkinson’s disease, people are less likely to take the drugs as often as their doctors prescribed, according to a study funded by the American Academy of Neurology and published in the February 19, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Parkinson’s Disease Protein Structure Solved Inside Cells Using Novel Technique
12-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
Parkinson’s Disease Protein Structure Solved Inside Cells Using Novel Technique
Biophysical Society

The top contributor to familial Parkinson’s disease is mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), whose large and difficult structure has finally been solved, paving the way for targeted therapies.

Newswise: Gene ID’d as potential therapeutic target for dementia in Parkinson’s
3-Feb-2020 7:00 AM EST
Gene ID’d as potential therapeutic target for dementia in Parkinson’s
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the genetic variant APOE4 – long linked to dementia – spurs the spread of harmful clumps of Parkinson’s proteins through the brain. The findings suggest that therapies that target APOE might reduce the risk of dementia for people with Parkinson’s disease.

4-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
Researcher’s technology differentiates between Parkinson’s disease and multiple system atrophy
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Scientists have found a way to distinguish between two progressive neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson’s disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), using a technology developed by a researcher at UTHealth. The discovery was published today in Nature.

Released: 31-Jan-2020 12:50 PM EST
Can Exercise Improve Video Game Performance?
McGill University

Time spent playing video games is often seen as time stolen from physical activities. Research has shown that exercise has many physical and cognitive benefits.

Newswise: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Study Finds a Drug-Like Compound That May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease Progression
Released: 30-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Study Finds a Drug-Like Compound That May Prevent Parkinson’s Disease Progression
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and The Scripps Research Institute led to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's Disease.

Newswise: Parkinson's Disease May Start Before Birth
24-Jan-2020 2:05 PM EST
Parkinson's Disease May Start Before Birth
Cedars-Sinai

People who develop Parkinson's disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to EMBARGOED Cedars-Sinai research that will publish Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Medicine. The research points to a drug that potentially might help correct these disease processes.

Released: 27-Jan-2020 9:55 AM EST
Technology Used in Space Experiments Could Reveal Key Information about Human Health
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In an article published recently in Microgravity, a Nature Journal, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrate a unique method for studying the mechanisms behind the formation of amyloid fibrils associated with diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Released: 20-Dec-2019 10:25 AM EST
GB Sciences Announces Outstanding Results from Preclinical Study of Its Parkinson's Disease Formulations
GB Sciences, Inc.

GB Sciences, Inc. (OTCQB: GBLX) announced significant preclinical results for their Parkinson's disease ("PD") formulations from the midterm report for their preclinical study being performed by Dr. Lee Ellis of the National Research Council (NRC) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, CANADA.

12-Dec-2019 12:05 PM EST
Nilotinib Appears Safe In Parkinson’s Trial; Drug Thought to Allow Dopamine Replenishment
Georgetown University Medical Center

A clinical trial investigating the repurposed cancer drug nilotinib in people with Parkinson’s disease finds that it is reasonably safe and well tolerated. Researchers also report finding an increase in dopamine, the chemical lost as a result of neuronal destruction, and a decrease in neurotoxic proteins in the brain among study participants. Finally, they say nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, potentially halts motor and non-motor decline.

Newswise: Why Doesn’t Deep-Brain Stimulation Work for Everyone?
6-Dec-2019 4:05 PM EST
Why Doesn’t Deep-Brain Stimulation Work for Everyone?
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have mapped nine functional networks in the deep-brain structures of 10 healthy people, an accomplishment that could lead to improvements in deep-brain stimulation therapy for severe cases of Parkinson’s disease and other neurological conditions.

Newswise: 218695_web.jpg
Released: 4-Dec-2019 12:05 PM EST
A new study reveals the function of corpora amylacea to remove brain waste substances
Universidad De Barcelona

An article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describes a new pathway in the central nervous system to expel waste substances from the brain through the creation of corpora amylacea (CA), aggregates formed by glucose polymers amassing waste products.

22-Nov-2019 11:05 PM EST
Beware of Swimming if You Use Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers have identified nine cases of people who lost their ability to swim after having a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The new research is published in the November 27, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. All nine people had been good swimmers even after their Parkinson’s disease diagnosis. But once they had deep brain stimulation surgery, researchers found while other movement symptoms improved, their swimming skills deteriorated.

Newswise: Stem Cells Don't Take the Day Off on Thanksgiving
Released: 22-Nov-2019 7:05 PM EST
Stem Cells Don't Take the Day Off on Thanksgiving
Cedars-Sinai

While most of us are enjoying the traditional turkey and pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving Day, employees at Cedars-Sinai will be hand-feeding stem cells their special daily formula, carefully monitoring the incubator temperatures and caring for the cells that may become part of important research that could one day lead to treatments for diseases that have plagued humans for years.

Released: 21-Nov-2019 8:00 AM EST
NINDS Awards Coriell Institute for Medical Research $7.7 Million Contract
Coriell Institute for Medical Research

The five-year award will support the NINDS Human Genetics Resource Center, a collection of biological samples and corresponding demographic, clinical, and genetic data made available to qualified researchers around the world. This repository includes samples from subjects with various diseases – such as cerebrovascular disease, dystonia, epilepsy, motor neuron disease, parkinsonism, and Tourette Syndrome.


Showing results

150 of 206

close
4.85513