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Newswise: Johns Hopkins Taps Twitter to Measure Success of Social Distancing
Released: 6-Apr-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Taps Twitter to Measure Success of Social Distancing
Johns Hopkins University

By comparing Twitter data from before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, Johns Hopkins University researchers found a profound impact on the movement of Americans – indicating social distancing recommendations are having an effect.

Released: 6-Apr-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Researchers at Missouri S&T use social media to study COVID-19
Missouri University of Science and Technology

As COVID-19 sweeps across the U.S. and the world, people have taken to social media with concerns, questions and opinions. Researchers at Missouri S&T are analyzing tens of millions of posts on Twitter in real time to show how attitudes toward the disease have changed. The researchers are designing machine learning and natural language processing techniques for the study.

Released: 1-Apr-2020 12:00 PM EDT
FSU study finds no media bias when it comes to story selection
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: April 1, 2020 | 11:22 am | SHARE: For as long as there have been news media, there have been allegations that journalists are biased and slant stories to fit their views. While many studies have explored this issue, there has been little research into how political ideology influences which stories get covered.

Newswise: twister-marquiss.jpg?mode=fit&width=600
Released: 1-Apr-2020 11:35 AM EDT
COVID-19 provides fertile breeding ground for conspiracy theories
Texas State University

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the spread of conspiracy theories about the coronavirus threatens to undermine legitimate efforts to combat the disease and cause lasting harm, warn researchers at Texas State University.

Released: 31-Mar-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Fake Russian Twitter accounts politicized discourse about vaccines
University at Buffalo

Activity from phony Twitter accounts established by the Russian Internet Research Agency between 2015 and 2017 may have contributed to politicizing Americans’ position on the nature and efficacy of vaccines, a health care topic which has not historically fallen along party lines, according to new research published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Newswise: In politics and pandemics, Russian trolls use fear, anger to drive clicks
Released: 30-Mar-2020 12:00 PM EDT
In politics and pandemics, Russian trolls use fear, anger to drive clicks
University of Colorado Boulder

A new analysis of more than 2,500 fake ads posted by the Russian troll factory, the Internet Research Agency, shows fear and anger work remarkably well to draw clicks. With the 2020 election approaching and the COVID-19 pandemic wearing on, the trolls are at it again, the researches say.

Newswise: Going online gets real as we inch towards full isolation
Released: 30-Mar-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Going online gets real as we inch towards full isolation
University of South Australia

From the couch choir to YouTube yoga, online communities are flourishing, as the restrictions on social gatherings to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, become tighter and tighter. UniSA Online course facilitator and communicative engagement researcher, Kim Burley says the speed at which people are adapting their social engagement from actual to virtual has been fast and fantastic.

Released: 30-Mar-2020 8:00 AM EDT
How social media makes it difficult to identify real news
Ohio State University

There’s a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests.

Newswise: How can we be more sure social media
posts about coronavirus are accurate?
Released: 26-Mar-2020 2:20 PM EDT
How can we be more sure social media posts about coronavirus are accurate?
University of Alabama Huntsville

As COVID-19 has increasingly isolated us from each other, we’re relying more and more on social media for a sense of connection and as a source of information about the virus and it’s spread. But how can we be more confident that what we’re seeing is accurate?


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