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Newswise: DESI at Kitt Peak Has Mapped More Galaxies Than All Previous 3D Surveys Combined
Released: 13-Jan-2022 1:40 PM EST
DESI at Kitt Peak Has Mapped More Galaxies Than All Previous 3D Surveys Combined
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) has cataloged more galaxies than all other previous three-dimensional redshift surveys combined, measuring 7.5 million galaxies in only seven months since beginning science operations. The US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads DESI, which is installed at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a program of NSF's NOIRLab, on the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope.

Newswise: UAH involved in Parker Solar Probe breakthrough in effort to a solve solar puzzle
Released: 14-Dec-2021 2:20 PM EST
UAH involved in Parker Solar Probe breakthrough in effort to a solve solar puzzle
University of Alabama Huntsville

Scientists are closer to solving a solar heating puzzle using direct data now that NASA’s Parker Solar Probe (PSP), on which The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) teamed to develop an instrument suite to directly measure particles from the solar wind, has for the first time entered a region never before explored.

Newswise: Mini-Jet Found Near Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole
Released: 9-Dec-2021 1:00 PM EST
Mini-Jet Found Near Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Astronomers using Hubble and radio telescopes have found increasing evidence that the black hole near the center of our Milky Way galaxy periodically awakens, captures a star or gas cloud that falls into it, and then releases powerful beams of radiation and particles.

Newswise: Gemini Catches a One-Winged Butterfly
Released: 7-Dec-2021 2:15 PM EST
Gemini Catches a One-Winged Butterfly
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

This ethereal image, captured from Chile by the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab, looks as delicate as a butterfly’s wing. It is, however, a structure known as the Chamaeleon Infrared Nebula, which is located near the center of the mammoth Chamaeleon I dark cloud, one of the nearest star-forming regions in our Milky Way.

Newswise:Video Embedded hubble-s-grand-tour-of-the-outer-solar-system
VIDEO
Released: 18-Nov-2021 1:00 PM EST
Hubble's Grand Tour of the Outer Solar System
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

The Hubble Space Telescope is taking us on the scenic route through the outer Solar System with crisp new images of the gas giants—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

Newswise: NASA’s Webb Will Join Forces with the Event Horizon Telescope to Reveal the Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole
Released: 27-Oct-2021 10:05 AM EDT
NASA’s Webb Will Join Forces with the Event Horizon Telescope to Reveal the Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

In its first year of operations, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will join forces with a global collaborative effort to create an image of the area directly surrounding the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy.

Newswise: Astrophysicists Reveal Largest-Ever Suite of Universe Simulations
22-Oct-2021 5:00 AM EDT
Astrophysicists Reveal Largest-Ever Suite of Universe Simulations
Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

To understand how the universe formed, astronomers have created AbacusSummit, more than 160 simulations of how gravity may have shaped the distribution of dark matter.

Newswise: 1018_titan.jpg?itok=p27ecTuq.jpg
Released: 18-Oct-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Titan’s River Maps May Advise Dragonfly’s Sedimental Journey
Cornell University

With future space exploration in mind, a Cornell-led team of astronomers has published the final maps of Titan’s liquid methane rivers and tributaries – as seen by NASA’s late Cassini mission – so that may help provide context for Dragonfly’s upcoming 2030s expedition.

Newswise: Did a Black Hole Eating a Star Generate a Neutrino? Unlikely, New Study Shows
Released: 13-Oct-2021 5:00 AM EDT
Did a Black Hole Eating a Star Generate a Neutrino? Unlikely, New Study Shows
Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

New calculations show that a black hole slurping down a star may not have generated enough energy to launch a neutrino.

Newswise: Rocks on floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, show signs of sustained interactions with water
Released: 11-Oct-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Rocks on floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, show signs of sustained interactions with water
Geological Society of America (GSA)

Since the Perseverance rover landed in Jezero crater on Mars in February, the rover and its team of scientists back on Earth have been hard at work exploring the floor of the crater that once held an ancient lake.

Newswise: 1005_jupiter.jpg
Released: 5-Oct-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Extreme exoplanet even more exotic than originally thought
Cornell University

Considered an ultra-hot Jupiter – a place where iron gets vaporized, condenses on the night side and then falls from the sky like rain – the fiery, inferno-like WASP-76b exoplanet may be even more sizzling than scientists had realized.

Newswise: This is what it looks like when a black hole snacks on a star
Released: 27-Sep-2021 4:05 PM EDT
This is what it looks like when a black hole snacks on a star
University of Arizona

While black holes and toddlers don't seem to have much in common, they are remarkably similar in one aspect: Both are messy eaters, generating ample evidence that a meal has taken place.

Newswise: Planets Form in Organic Soups with Different Ingredients
13-Sep-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Planets Form in Organic Soups with Different Ingredients
Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

A series of new images reveals that planets form in organic soups — and no two soups are alike.

Newswise: 800_moonandmarsbiocomposites.jpg
Released: 13-Sep-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Affordable housing in outer space: Scientists develop cosmic concrete from space dust and astronaut blood
University of Manchester

Transporting a single brick to Mars can cost more than a million British pounds – making the future construction of a Martian colony seem prohibitively expensive.

Newswise:Video Embedded spectacular-portrait-of-centaurus-a
VIDEO
Released: 31-Aug-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Spectacular Portrait of Centaurus A
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

A spectacular portrait of the galaxy Centaurus A has been captured by astronomers using the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.

Newswise:Video Embedded construction-begins-on-the-noirlab-windows-on-the-universe-center-for-astronomy-outreach
VIDEO
Released: 18-Aug-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Construction Begins on the NOIRLab Windows on the Universe Center for Astronomy Outreach
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

What was once the largest solar observatory in the world is now undergoing a transformation to become a one-of-a-kind facility for sharing the wonders of astronomy with people around the globe. Construction work has started to recast the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope facility at Kitt Peak National Observatory into the NOIRLab Windows on the Universe Center for Astronomy Outreach.

Newswise: dragonfly-01.jpeg?itok=wLyk3lVg.jpg
Released: 10-Aug-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Dragonfly Mission to Titan Announces Big Science Goals
Cornell University

NASA’s Dragonfly mission, which will send a rotorcraft relocatable lander to Titan’s surface in the mid-2030s, has big goals.

Newswise: Public
Released: 4-Aug-2021 2:50 PM EDT
NASA Model Describes Nearby Star Which Resembles Ours in Its Youth
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

New research led by NASA provides a closer look at a nearby star thought to resemble our young Sun.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:40 PM EDT
First Detection of Light From Behind a Black Hole
Stanford University

Watching X-rays flung out into the universe by the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years away, Stanford University astrophysicist Dan Wilkins noticed an intriguing pattern.

Newswise:Video Embedded astronomers-uncover-briefest-supernova-powered-gamma-ray-burst
VIDEO
Released: 26-Jul-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Astronomers Uncover Briefest Supernova-Powered Gamma-Ray Burst
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Astronomers have discovered the shortest-ever gamma-ray burst (GRB) caused by the implosion of a massive star. Using the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, astronomers identified the cause of this 0.6-second flurry of gamma rays as a supernova explosion in a distant galaxy. GRBs caused by supernovae are usually more than twice as long, which suggests that some short GRBs might actually be imposters — supernova-produced GRBs in disguise.

Newswise: Weizmann Institute Scientists on the Juno Mission Reveal How Giant Cyclones Remain Stable at Jupiter’s Poles
Released: 19-Jul-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Weizmann Institute Scientists on the Juno Mission Reveal How Giant Cyclones Remain Stable at Jupiter’s Poles
Weizmann Institute of Science

A co-investigator on NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter, Prof. Yohai Kaspi and his team have made discoveries about the gas giant’s climate: Each pole has several Australia-sized cyclones that rarely change their size, number, or position because massive polar storms keep them at bay, and strong jet streams won’t let them form below a certain latitude.

Newswise: EHT Pinpoints Dark Heart of the Nearest Radio Galaxy
16-Jul-2021 6:00 AM EDT
EHT Pinpoints Dark Heart of the Nearest Radio Galaxy
Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

Astronomers have imaged the heart of Centaurus A in unprecedented detail and pinpointed the galaxy’s central supermassive black hole, revealing how a gigantic jet is born. Most remarkably, only the outer edges of the jet seem to emit radiation, which challenges current theoretical models of jets.

Newswise: Sculpted by Starlight: A Meteorite Witness to the Solar System’s Birth
Released: 5-Jul-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Sculpted by Starlight: A Meteorite Witness to the Solar System’s Birth
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers examine a 4.6 billion- year-old rock to better understand the solar system’s beginning, and a modern mystery.

Released: 28-Jun-2021 8:35 AM EDT
Life Could Exist in the Clouds of Jupiter but Not Venus
Queen's University Belfast

Jupiter’s clouds have water conditions that would allow Earth-like life to exist, but this isn’t possible in Venus’ clouds, according to the groundbreaking finding of new research led by a Queen’s University Belfast scientist.

Newswise: 268719_web.jpg
Released: 24-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Earth-like biospheres on other planets may be rare
Royal Astronomical Society

A new analysis of known exoplanets has revealed that Earth-like conditions on potentially habitable planets may be much rarer than previously thought.

Newswise: propellor_star_j0240_v2a_crop.jpg
Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Scientists identify a rare magnetic propeller in a binary star system
University of Notre Dame

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have identified the first eclipsing magnetic propeller in a cataclysmic variable star system, according to research forthcoming in the Astrophysical Journal.

Newswise:Video Embedded does-the-milky-way-move-like-a-spinning-top
VIDEO
Released: 25-May-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Does the Milky Way move like a spinning top?
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC)

An investigation carried out by the astrophysicists of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) ?ofia Chrobáková, a doctoral student at the IAC and the University of La Laguna (ULL), and Martín López Corredoira, questions one of the most interesting findings about the dynamics of the Milky Way in recent years: the precession, or the wobble in the axis of rotation of the disc warp is incorrect.

Newswise: Hubble Tracks Down Fast Radio Bursts to Galaxies' Spiral Arms
Released: 20-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Hubble Tracks Down Fast Radio Bursts to Galaxies' Spiral Arms
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Astronomers are on the trail of one of the universe's most enigmatic events: powerful bursts of radio waves that disappear in the blink of an eye. Using Hubble, they have traced the radio bursts to the spiral arms of distant galaxies.

Newswise: hpf_fiber1-768x436.jpg
Released: 18-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
UCI-Led Team Challenges Existence of Recently Proposed Exoplanet at Barnard’s Star
University of California, Irvine

In 2018, astronomers announced that they had discovered an exoplanet orbiting Barnard’s star, our solar system’s second-closest stellar neighbor, but further analysis by an international group of researchers headed by a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine has cast doubt on the finding.

Newswise:Video Embedded black-hole-pairs-found-in-distant-merging-galaxies
VIDEO
Released: 7-Apr-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Black Hole Pairs Found in Distant Merging Galaxies
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Astronomers have found two close pairs of quasars in the distant Universe. Follow-up observations with Gemini North spectroscopically resolved one of the distant quasar pairs, after their discovery with the Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia spacecraft. These quasars are closer together than any pair of quasars found so far away, providing strong evidence for the existence of supermassive black hole pairs as well as crucial insight into galaxy mergers in the early Universe.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 4:55 PM EDT
First X-rays from Uranus discovered
Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

Astronomers have detected X-rays from Uranus for the first time, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result may help scientists learn more about this enigmatic ice giant planet in our solar system.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 4:35 PM EDT
What happened to mars's water? It is still trapped there
California Institute of Technology

Billions of years ago, the Red Planet was far more blue; according to evidence still found on the surface, abundant water flowed across Mars and forming pools, lakes, and deep oceans. The question, then, is where did all that water go?

Newswise: Mars’ Early Climate Was Intermittently Warm
5-Mar-2021 9:55 AM EST
Mars’ Early Climate Was Intermittently Warm
Stony Brook University

A new study that characterizes the climate of Mars over the planet’s lifetime reveals that in its earliest history it was periodically warmed, yet remained relatively cold in the intervening periods, thus providing opportunities and challenges for any microbial life form that may have been emerging.

Newswise: Hubble Solves Mystery of Monster Star's Dimming
Released: 4-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EST
Hubble Solves Mystery of Monster Star's Dimming
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble astronomers are investigating the dimming of one of the most colossal stars ever seen, VY Canis Majoris. Big enough to swallow our solar system out to Saturn’s orbit, the faded star is expelling huge dust clouds late in its life.

Newswise: Comet Makes a Pit Stop Near Jupiter's Asteroids
Released: 25-Feb-2021 12:00 PM EST
Comet Makes a Pit Stop Near Jupiter's Asteroids
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble snapped this image of the young comet-like object P/2019 LD2 as it orbits near Jupiter’s captured ancient asteroids, which are called Trojans. The icy object is the first comet astronomers have spotted near the Trojan population.

Newswise:Video Embedded binary-stars-are-all-around-us-new-map-of-solar-neighborhood-shows
VIDEO
Released: 22-Feb-2021 12:45 PM EST
Binary stars are all around us, new map of solar neighborhood shows
University of California, Berkeley

The latest star data from the Gaia space observatory has for the first time allowed astronomers to generate a massive 3D atlas of widely separated binary stars within about 3,000 light years of Earth -- 1.3 million of them.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-rewind-the-clock-to-calculate-age-and-site-of-supernova-blast
VIDEO
Released: 14-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
Researchers Rewind the Clock to Calculate Age and Site of Supernova Blast
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble astronomers have retraced the expanding gaseous debris from a nearby exploded star to estimate the location and time of the stellar detonation. Their analysis reveals that the light from the supernova blast reached Earth about 1,700 years ago.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-earliest-supermassive-black-hole-and-quasar-in-the-universe
VIDEO
Released: 12-Jan-2021 2:05 PM EST
The Earliest Supermassive Black Hole and Quasar in the Universe
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

The most distant quasar known has been discovered. The quasar, observed just 670 million years after the Big Bang, is 1000 times more luminous than the Milky Way. It is powered by the earliest known supermassive black hole, which weighs in at more than 1.6 billion times the mass of the Sun. Seen more than 13 billion years ago, this fully formed distant quasar is also the earliest yet discovered, providing astronomers with insight into the formation of massive galaxies in the early Universe. The result was released today at the January 2021 meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

Newswise:Video Embedded roman-space-telescope-could-image-100-hubble-ultra-deep-fields-at-once
VIDEO
Released: 11-Jan-2021 4:15 PM EST
Roman Space Telescope Could Image 100 Hubble Ultra Deep Fields at Once
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

In 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope stared at a blank patch of the sky for 10 straight days. The resulting Deep Field image captured thousands of previously unseen, distant galaxies. The Roman Space Telescope will be able to photograph an area of sky 100 times larger than Hubble with the same exquisite sharpness. As a result, a Roman Ultra Deep Field would collect millions of galaxies, including hundreds that date back to just a few hundred million years after the big bang.

Newswise: Multi-messenger astronomy offers new estimates of the size of neutron stars and the rate of the universe’s expansion
Released: 21-Dec-2020 12:50 PM EST
Multi-messenger astronomy offers new estimates of the size of neutron stars and the rate of the universe’s expansion
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A combination of astrophysical measurements has allowed researchers to put new constraints on the radius of a typical neutron star and provide a novel calculation of the Hubble constant that indicates the rate at which the universe is expanding.

Newswise: exoplanet-formation.jpg
11-Dec-2020 11:40 AM EST
Are we alone in the universe? UAH’s Dr. Gary Zank doesn’t think so
University of Alabama Huntsville

Are we alone in the universe? Research by Dr. Gary Zank at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System, and collaborators from UAH and other institutions has helped to inform the search for planets that could harbor life.

Newswise: Astronomers Develop Model for the Distribution of Inner Planetary Systems
Released: 30-Nov-2020 3:30 PM EST
Astronomers Develop Model for the Distribution of Inner Planetary Systems
Penn State Institute for Computational and Data Sciences

Data from the Kepler space telescope, launched more than a decade ago, is still helping astronomers who study planets outside of our own solar system — exoplanets — and unravel the mysteries of planetary systems. Initially, astronomers were surprised that Kepler found so many exoplanets, including hundreds of planetary systems with multiple planets orbiting close to their host star. As astronomers developed models to explain the abundance of inner exoplanets, they encountered a new mystery: “Why did Kepler detect just one planet around so many stars, instead of planetary systems with multiple planets?"

Newswise: 249981_web.jpg
Released: 30-Nov-2020 11:55 AM EST
Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy
National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS)

Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole.

Newswise:Video Embedded nsf-s-national-solar-observatory-predicts-a-large-sunspot-for-thanksgiving
VIDEO
Released: 24-Nov-2020 11:00 AM EST
NSF’s National Solar Observatory Predicts a Large Sunspot for Thanksgiving
National Solar Observatory

On November 18 scientists from the US National Science Foundation’s National Solar Observatory predicted the arrival of a large sunspot just in time for Thanksgiving. Using a special technique called helioseismology, the team has been “listening” to changing sound waves from the Sun’s interior which beckon the arrival of a large sunspot.

Newswise:Video Embedded blast-from-the-past2
VIDEO
Released: 24-Nov-2020 10:05 AM EST
Blast from the Past
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

An international team of astronomers using Gemini North’s GNIRS instrument have discovered that CK Vulpeculae, first seen as a bright new star in 1670, is approximately five times farther away than previously thought. This makes the 1670 explosion of CK Vulpeculae much more energetic than previously estimated and puts it into a mysterious class of objects that are too bright to be members of the well-understood type of explosions known as novae, but too faint to be supernovae.

Newswise: 249232_web.jpg
Released: 18-Nov-2020 12:15 PM EST
In the mysterious Blue Ring Nebula, scientists see the fate of binary stars
Princeton University

In 2004, scientists with NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer spotted an object unlike any they'd seen in our Milky Way Galaxy: a large, faint blob of gas that seemed to have a star at its center.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-los-alamos-national-laboratory-spin-off-aims-to-put-nuclear-reactors-in-space
VIDEO
Released: 2-Nov-2020 11:55 AM EST
New Los Alamos National Laboratory spin-off aims to put nuclear reactors in space
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new agreement hopes to speed along a nuclear reactor technology that could be used to fuel deep-space exploration and possibly power human habitats on the Moon or Mars. Los Alamos National Laboratory has signed an agreement to license the “Kilopower” space reactor technology to Space Nuclear Power Corporation (SpaceNukes), also based in Los Alamos, NM.

Newswise: Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Released: 27-Oct-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
University of Georgia

Humankind’s next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet.

Newswise:Video Embedded nasa-s-webb-will-explore-the-cores-of-merging-galaxies
VIDEO
Released: 23-Sep-2020 10:15 AM EDT
NASA's Webb Telescope Will Explore the Cores of Merging Galaxies
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Merging galaxies often appear lit up like a fireworks display. The meeting of their gas flows accelerates star formation and feeds their central black holes. However, much of this activity, particularly where they are interacting, is shrouded by dust. Webb’s significantly more sensitive, sharper observations in infrared light will be able to see through the dust, leading to high-resolution data that will reveal far more about what’s happening at the cores of these galaxies.


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