Feature Channels: Sports

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Newswise: What happens when sports are canceled?
Released: 1-Apr-2020 11:10 AM EDT
What happens when sports are canceled?
University of Georgia

Professor offers insights in the new void in society

Released: 31-Mar-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Increasing Muscle Size and Strength, Exergames and Older Adults and Treadmills and Cancer Care from Medicine & Science in Sports & Science
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

If you're looking for health and fitness story ideas, view these research highlights from ACSM’s flagship research journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®.

Newswise: Professional and College Sports Not Likely to Come Back Soon
Released: 26-Mar-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Professional and College Sports Not Likely to Come Back Soon
Rutgers School of Public Health

Professional and college sports leagues are unlikely to resume their COVID-19-interrupted seasons anytime soon, according to Mitchel Rosen, a preparedness expert at the Rutgers School of Public Health. While unfortunate for Americans who look to sports to maintain a sense of normalcy, the interruption of play protects the health of spectators and players.

Newswise: Argonne scientists lead push to strengthen cybersecurity in sports stadiums
Released: 24-Mar-2020 8:15 AM EDT
Argonne scientists lead push to strengthen cybersecurity in sports stadiums
Argonne National Laboratory

To combat the cyber threat in sports, Argonne scientists built an assessment tool for team and stadium owners to fix vulnerabilities.

Newswise: McMaster professor seeks independent agency to tackle abuse in elite youth sport
16-Mar-2020 3:40 PM EDT
McMaster professor seeks independent agency to tackle abuse in elite youth sport
McMaster University

The author calls for the establishment of an independent international safeguarding agency for sports to handle athlete disclosures, investigate and process allegations, and to support victims of abuse. The expertise developed could then be used for preventive efforts. This agency would have to have sufficient cash and clout to be effective.

Released: 17-Mar-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Tang Dynasty noblewoman buried with her donkeys, for the love of polo
Washington University in St. Louis

A noblewoman from Imperial China enjoyed playing polo on donkeys so much she had her steeds buried with her so she could keep doing it in the afterlife, archaeologists found. This discovery by a team that includes Fiona Marshall, the James W. and Jean L. Davis Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, is published March 17 in the journal Antiquity. The research provides the first physical evidence of donkey polo in Imperial China, which previously was only known from historical texts. It also sheds light on the role for donkeys in the lives of high status women in that period.


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