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Newswise: Fast-Growing Poplars Can Release Land for Food Production
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:20 PM EDT
Fast-Growing Poplars Can Release Land for Food Production
Stockholm University

Researchers at Stockholm University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel value chain for production of textile and bio-fuel from fast-growing poplars.

Newswise: Sleeping Giant Could End Deep Ocean Life
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:15 PM EDT
Sleeping Giant Could End Deep Ocean Life
University of California, Riverside

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures.

Newswise: Floating ‘Artificial Leaves’ Ride the Wave of Clean Fuel Production
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:40 PM EDT
Floating ‘Artificial Leaves’ Ride the Wave of Clean Fuel Production
University of Cambridge

Researchers have developed floating ‘artificial leaves’ that generate clean fuels from sunlight and water, and could eventually operate on a large scale at sea.

Newswise: How Environmental Changes Affect the Shapes of RNA in Living Cells
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:30 PM EDT
How Environmental Changes Affect the Shapes of RNA in Living Cells
John Innes Centre

The impact of environmental conditions on the dynamic structures of RNAs in living cells has been revealed by innovative technology developed by researchers at the John Innes Centre.

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VIDEO
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:15 PM EDT
New 3D Model Shows: Megalodon Could Eat Prey the Size of Entire Killer Whales
University of Zurich

The reconstructed megadolon (Otodus megalodon) was 16 meters long and weighed over 61 tons. It was estimated that it could swim at around 1.4 meters per second, require over 98,000 kilo calories every day and have stomach volume of almost 10,000 liters.

Newswise: Climate-Resilient Breadfruit Might Be the Food of the Future
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Climate-Resilient Breadfruit Might Be the Food of the Future
Northwestern University

In the face of climate change, breadfruit soon might come to a dinner plate near you. While researchers predict that climate change will have an adverse effect on most staple crops, including rice, corn and soybeans, a new Northwestern University study finds that breadfruit — a starchy tree fruit native to the Pacific islands — will be relatively unaffected.

Newswise: Lungless Salamanders Develop Lungs as Embryos Despite Lung Loss in Adults for Millions of Years
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Lungless Salamanders Develop Lungs as Embryos Despite Lung Loss in Adults for Millions of Years
Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Lungs are essential to many vertebrates including humans. However, four living amphibian clades have independently eliminated pulmonary respiration and lack lungs, breathing primarily through their wet skin. Little is known of the developmental basis of lung loss in these clades.

Newswise: Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
University of Zurich

Throughout evolution, prey animals have adopted a range of strategies to evade their predators. But these oftentimes elaborate strategies come at a cost.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:45 PM EDT
DOE’s Office of Science Is Now Accepting Applications for Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Awards
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science is pleased to announce that the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program is now accepting applications for the 2022 Solicitation 2 cycle. Applications are due 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Wednesday, November 9, 2022.

Newswise: Big Data in the ER
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:40 PM EDT
Big Data in the ER
Osaka University

Researchers at Osaka University use machine learning methods on a large dataset of trauma patients to determine the factors that correlate with survival, which may significantly improve triage and rapid treatment procedures.

   
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:20 PM EDT
Mars Model Provides Method for Landing Humans on Red Planet
Australian National University

A mathematical model developed by space medicine experts from The Australian National University (ANU) could be used to predict whether an astronaut can safely travel to Mars and fulfil their mission duties upon stepping foot on the Red Planet.

Newswise: Research Method Predicts a Region’s Likelihood of Having Fish with Toxic Levels of Methylmercury
Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:50 PM EDT
Research Method Predicts a Region’s Likelihood of Having Fish with Toxic Levels of Methylmercury
Wiley

Consuming methylmercury-contaminated fish poses a hazard to human health. New research published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry may help environmental resource management officials predict which regions are likely to have fish with high concentrations of this toxin, without the need for extensive testing.

Newswise: How Young Chickens Play Can Indicate How They Feel
Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:45 PM EDT
How Young Chickens Play Can Indicate How They Feel
Linkoping University

It is common for young animals, in particular mammals, to play. Researchers at Linköping University (LiU), Sweden, have for the first time mapped the development of play in young chickens. The results show that the young chickens spend lots of time playing in different ways – just like puppies and kittens.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Sailing Drones to Capture Ecosystem Data From Lake Superior
Cornell University

Seafaring drones on Lake Superior will soon allow a team of Cornell University scientists to examine fresh details about the abundance and distribution of forage fish – species, such as zooplankton and shrimp, which provide nourishment for sportier marine species higher on the food chain.

Newswise: Geological Carbon Sequestration in Mantle Rocks Prevents Large Earthquakes in Parts of the San Andreas Fault
Released: 17-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Geological Carbon Sequestration in Mantle Rocks Prevents Large Earthquakes in Parts of the San Andreas Fault
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Now, researchers say ubiquitous evidence for ongoing geological carbon sequestration in mantle rocks in the creeping sections of the SAF is one underlying cause of aseismic creep along a roughly 150 kilometer-long SAF segment between San Juan Bautista and Parkfield, California, and along several other fault segments.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 5:50 PM EDT
Sustainable Practices Linked to Farm Size in Organic Farming
Cornell University

Larger organic farms operate more like conventional farms and use fewer sustainable practices than smaller organic farms, according to a new Cornell University study that also provides insight into how to increase adoption of sustainable practices.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Gilson's VERITY® 1741 UV-VIS Detector is Specially Designed to Secure Semi-Preparative and Preparative HPLC Applications
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

Today, Gilson announced a new UV-VIS detector to its VERITY® line of purification systems. The VERITY® 1741 UV-VIS Detector is specifically designed with the needs of semi-preparative and preparative HPLC customers in mind.

   
Released: 25-Jul-2022 4:30 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Gene That Promotes Muscle Strength During Exercise
University of Melbourne

Researchers have identified a gene that promotes muscle strength when switched on by physical activity, unlocking the potential for the development of therapeutic treatments to mimic some of the benefits of working out.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:55 PM EDT
Bridging the Digital Divide with 6G Technology
University of Strathclyde

Light-based technology, for making telecommunications more accessible in remote and rural areas, is to be developed in a collaboration between the University of Strathclyde and Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) in Germany.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Next Generation Atomic Clocks Are a Step Closer to Real World Applications
University of Birmingham

Quantum clocks are shrinking, thanks to new technologies developed at the University of Birmingham-led UK Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing.

Newswise: When the Invasive Fish Are Native
Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:40 PM EDT
When the Invasive Fish Are Native
University of Barcelona

UB study warns about the ecological impact of native species in waters that do not correspond to them.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Milking Molecules From Microbes
King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)

A sustainable chemical separation method that uses membranes, microalgae and artificial intelligence has been developed by a team drawn from different KAUST groups whose members have diverse specialties in bioengineering, membranes and water reuse and recycling.

Newswise: For Dairy Farmers, Where Does the Time Go?
Released: 25-Jul-2022 2:55 PM EDT
For Dairy Farmers, Where Does the Time Go?
Elsevier

A new study in the July Journal of Dairy Science® examines labor time-use on pasture-based dairy farms in Ireland.

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VIDEO
Released: 25-Jul-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Journal of Medical Internet Research | Rigor and Transparency Index: Large Scale Analysis of Scientific Reporting Quality
JMIR Publications

JMIR Publications recently published “Establishing Institutional Scores With the Rigor and Transparency Index: Large-scale Analysis of Scientific Reporting Quality” in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), which reported that improving rigor and transparency measures should lead to improvements in reproducibility across the scientific literature, but assessing measures of transparency tends to be very difficult if performed manually by reviewers.

       
Released: 25-Jul-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Extreme Heat Exposure Worsens Child Malnutrition
Cornell University

Exposure to extreme heat increases both chronic and acute malnutrition among infants and young children in low-income countries – threatening to reverse decades of progress, Cornell University research finds.

Newswise: Lumiradx to Present on Impact of Its Next-Generation Microfluidic Technology at American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago
Released: 25-Jul-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Lumiradx to Present on Impact of Its Next-Generation Microfluidic Technology at American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

LumiraDx, a next-generation point of care diagnostics company will be hosting an industry workshop at this week’s American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago. The workshop, held on July 27th, will include data-backed insights on the impact of LumiraDx’s advanced microfluidic technology over lateral flow point-of-care antigen tests, and the role of these rapid immunoassays in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

   
Newswise: Study Refutes Claim That T. Rex Was Three Separate Species
Released: 25-Jul-2022 12:15 PM EDT
Study Refutes Claim That T. Rex Was Three Separate Species
American Museum of Natural History

Paleontologists find insufficient evidence that iconic Tyrannosaurus rex should be reclassified

Newswise:Video Embedded cytovale-reveals-10-minute-510-k-pending-cytovale-system-and-intellisep-test-for-sepsis-at-aacc-2022
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jul-2022 10:40 AM EDT
Cytovale Reveals 10-Minute, 510(K) Pending Cytovale System and Intellisep Test for Sepsis at AACC 2022
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

Cytovale®, a medical diagnostics company focused on providing rapid and insightful tools to improve early detection of fast-moving and immune-mediated diseases, will reveal its 510(k) pending Cytovale system and 10-minute IntelliSep® sepsis risk stratification test at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) annual meeting, where new data featuring the test will also be shared. The instrument can be seen in the Cytovale booth, no. 5045, in the exhibit hall during Clinical Lab Expo hours. The IntelliSep test was recently named an AACC Disruptive Technology Award Semifinalist and is also being featured in the Disruptive Tech area of the exhibit hall during the meeting.

Newswise: PPPL scientists propose solution to a long-puzzling fusion problem
Released: 13-Jul-2022 10:05 AM EDT
PPPL scientists propose solution to a long-puzzling fusion problem
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

New finding could solve a paradox in spherical tokamak fusion experiments.

Released: 11-Jul-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Climate Change Reveals Unique Artefacts in Melting Ice Patches
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

One day more than 3000 years ago, someone lost a shoe at the place we today call Langfonne in the Jotunheimen mountains. The shoe is 28 cm long, which roughly corresponds to a modern size 36 or 37. The owner probably considered the shoe to be lost for good, but on 17 September 2007 it was found again – virtually intact.

Released: 11-Jul-2022 3:30 PM EDT
The Life Puzzle: The Location of Land on a Planet Can Affect Its Habitability
Royal Astronomical Society

New climate models have found that the amount and location of land on a planet’s surface can significantly impact its habitability. Astronomers have identified substantial differences in surface temperature, sea ice and water vapour across a planet’s surface for different land configurations.

Newswise: Undead Planets: The Unusual Conditions of the First Exoplanet Detection
Released: 11-Jul-2022 3:10 PM EDT
Undead Planets: The Unusual Conditions of the First Exoplanet Detection
Royal Astronomical Society

The first ever exoplanets were discovered 30 years ago around a rapidly rotating star, called a pulsar. Now, astronomers have revealed that these planets may be incredibly rare.

Newswise: Nanoparticles Can Save Historic Buildings
Released: 11-Jul-2022 1:40 PM EDT
Nanoparticles Can Save Historic Buildings
Vienna University of Technology

Buildings made of porous rock can weather over the years. Now, for the first time, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have studied in detail how silicate nanoparticles can help save them.

   
Newswise: Researchers Discover How Sound Reduces Pain in Mice
Released: 7-Jul-2022 5:10 PM EDT
Researchers Discover How Sound Reduces Pain in Mice
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental And Craniofacial Research (NIH NIDCR)

An international team of scientists has identified the neural mechanisms through which sound blunts pain in mice. The findings, which could inform development of safer methods to treat pain, were published in Science.

   
Newswise: Study Provides New Insights About Surface, Structure of Asteroid Bennu
Released: 7-Jul-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Study Provides New Insights About Surface, Structure of Asteroid Bennu
Southwest Research Institute

When NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft collected samples from asteroid Bennu’s surface in 2020, forces measured during the interaction provided scientists with a direct test of the poorly understood near-subsurface physical properties of rubble-pile asteroids. Now, a Southwest Research Institute-led study has characterized the layer just below the asteroid’s surface as composed of weakly bound rock fragments containing twice the void space as the overall asteroid.

Released: 7-Jul-2022 4:40 PM EDT
The Importance of Elders
University of California, Santa Barbara

Researchers argue that the long human lifespan is due in part to the contributions of older adults.

   
Released: 7-Jul-2022 4:30 PM EDT
Natural Selection May Be Making Society More Unequal
University of East Anglia

Contemporary humans are still evolving, but natural selection favours those with lower earnings and poorer education - according to research from the University of East Anglia.

   
Newswise: Study Reveals Yunnanozoans as the Oldest Known Stem Vertebrates
Released: 7-Jul-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Study Reveals Yunnanozoans as the Oldest Known Stem Vertebrates
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Scientists have long puzzled over the gap in the fossil record that would explain the evolution of invertebrates to vertebrates. Vertebrates, including fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and humans, share unique features, such as a backbone and a skull. Invertebrates are animals without backbones.

Newswise: Chemists Find a Contrary Effect: How Diluting with Water Makes a Solution Firm
Released: 7-Jul-2022 3:55 PM EDT
Chemists Find a Contrary Effect: How Diluting with Water Makes a Solution Firm
Eindhoven University of Technology

In Science Magazine, TU/e researchers publish teir research on new phase transitions of solutions and gels in water, which instinctively go against the basic principles of chemistry – and which they discovered by accident.

Newswise: New Research Finds Deep-Sea Mining Noise Pollution Will Stretch Hundreds of Miles
Released: 7-Jul-2022 3:40 PM EDT
New Research Finds Deep-Sea Mining Noise Pollution Will Stretch Hundreds of Miles
University of Hawaii at Manoa

New research published today in the peer-reviewed journal Science examines the potential for underwater noise pollution from seabed mining operations, which could affect the understudied species that live in the deep sea—the largest habitat on Earth.

Released: 7-Jul-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Protecting Our Coastline
Louisiana State University

Louisiana State University oceanographer develops new model to better predict barrier island retreat.

Released: 7-Jul-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Research Reveals Why Tackling Particle Pollution Leads to Rise in Photochemical Smog
University of York

Researchers from the University of York have discovered why reducing particle pollution is actually increasing surface ozone pollution in some emerging economies, negatively impacting health, ecosystems and agriculture.

Newswise: Ozone Depletion Over North Pole Produces Weather Anomalies
Released: 7-Jul-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Ozone Depletion Over North Pole Produces Weather Anomalies
ETH Zürich

Many people are familiar with the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, but what is less well known is that occasionally, the protective ozone in the stratosphere over the Arctic is destroyed as well, thinning the ozone layer there. This last happened in the spring months of 2020, and before that, in the spring of 2011.

Newswise: How Nuclear War Would Affect Earth Today
Released: 7-Jul-2022 1:25 PM EDT
How Nuclear War Would Affect Earth Today
Louisiana State University

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has brought the threat of nuclear warfare to the forefront. But how would modern nuclear detonations impact the world today? A new study published today provides stark information on the global impact of nuclear war.

Newswise: 150 Whales Observed Feeding Together
Released: 7-Jul-2022 1:15 PM EDT
150 Whales Observed Feeding Together
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research

For the first time since the ban on whaling, large groups of southern fin whales documented in the Antarctic.

Released: 7-Jul-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Marine Biology: Fin Whale Populations Rebound in Antarctic Feeding Grounds
Springer

Southern fin whales have been documented feeding in large numbers in ancestral feeding grounds in Antarctica for the first time since hunting was restricted in 1976. The paper, published in Scientific Reports, includes the first video documentation of large groups of fin whales feeding near Elephant Island, Antarctica.

Newswise: Experts Predict Top Emerging Impacts on Ocean Biodiversity Over Next Decade
Released: 7-Jul-2022 12:50 PM EDT
Experts Predict Top Emerging Impacts on Ocean Biodiversity Over Next Decade
University of Cambridge

Lithium extraction from the deep sea, overfishing of deeper-water species, and the unexpected ocean impacts of wildfires on land are among fifteen issues experts warn we ought to be addressing now.

Newswise: Smart Textiles Sense How Their Users Are Moving
Released: 7-Jul-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Smart Textiles Sense How Their Users Are Moving
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Using a novel fabrication process, MIT researchers have produced smart textiles that snugly conform to the body so they can sense the wearer’s posture and motions.

Newswise: Led by Columbia Engineering, Researchers Build Longest, Highly Conductive Molecular Nanowire
7-Jul-2022 10:45 AM EDT
Led by Columbia Engineering, Researchers Build Longest, Highly Conductive Molecular Nanowire
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia researchers announced today that they have built a nanowire that is 2.6 nanometers long, shows an unusual increase in conductance as the wire length increases, and has quasi-metallic properties. Its excellent conductivity holds great promise for the field of molecular electronics, enabling electronic devices to become even tinier.


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