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Released: 27-Jan-2016 4:05 PM EST
Maya Healers’ Conception of Cancer May Help Bridge Gap in Multicultural Settings Care
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

Understanding and integrating patients’ cultural beliefs into cancer treatment plans may help improve their acceptance of and adherence to treatment in multicultural settings. Researchers examined traditional Maya healers’ understanding of cancer and published their findings online today in the Journal of Global Oncology.

20-Jul-2015 2:30 PM EDT
New Pap Smear Schedule Led to Fewer Chlamydia Tests, New U-M Study Suggests
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

It’s a tale of two tests: one for early signs of cervical cancer, the other for the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia. But a change in the recommended schedule for one may have dramatically lowered the chances that young women would get the other, a new study finds.

Newswise:Video Embedded brent-seales-research-team-reveals-biblical-text-from-damaged-scroll
VIDEO
Released: 20-Jul-2015 10:05 AM EDT
Brent Seales' Research Team Reveals Biblical Text From Damaged Scroll
University of Kentucky

For the first time, advanced technologies made it possible to read parts of a damaged scroll that is at least 1,500 years old, discovered inside the Holy Ark of the synagogue at Ein Gedi in Israel. High-resolution scanning and UK Professor Brent Seales' revolutionary virtual unwrapping tool revealed verses from the Book of Leviticus.

Newswise: Stopping Malaria in Its Tracks
14-Jul-2015 1:05 PM EDT
Stopping Malaria in Its Tracks
The Rockefeller University Press

A new drug acts as a roadblock for malaria, curing mice of established infection, according to researchers. Treatment was not associated with obvious side effects, suggesting that the drug may also be safe and effective in humans.

Newswise:Video Embedded finding-the-origins-of-life-in-a-drying-puddle
VIDEO
Released: 19-Jul-2015 7:05 PM EDT
Finding the Origins of Life in a Drying Puddle
Georgia Institute of Technology

Anyone who’s ever noticed a water puddle drying in the sun has seen an environment that may have driven the type of chemical reactions that scientists believe were critical to the formation of life on the early Earth.

Newswise: How Clouds Get Their Brightness
Released: 17-Jul-2015 5:05 PM EDT
How Clouds Get Their Brightness
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

How clouds form and how they help set the temperature of the earth are two of the big remaining questions in climate research. Now, a study of clouds over the world's remotest ocean shows that ocean life is responsible for up to half the cloud droplets that pop in and out of existence during summer.

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VIDEO
Released: 16-Jul-2015 4:05 PM EDT
Yoichiro Nambu, Nobel-Winning Theoretical Physicist, 1921-2015
University of Chicago

University of Chicago Professor Emeritus Yoichiro Nambu, who received a share of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics for his theory about the workings of the subatomic world, died July 5 in Osaka, after an acute heart attack. He was 94.

Newswise: A Most Singular Nano-Imaging Technique
Released: 16-Jul-2015 2:05 PM EDT
A Most Singular Nano-Imaging Technique
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

“SINGLE” is a new imaging technique that provides the first atomic-scale 3D structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. This is an important step for improving the design of colloidal nanoparticles for catalysis and energy research applications.

Newswise: Device Delivers Drugs to Brain via Remote Control
AUDIO
14-Jul-2015 5:00 PM EDT
Device Delivers Drugs to Brain via Remote Control
Washington University in St. Louis

A team of researchers, including neuroscientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has developed a wireless device the width of a human hair that can be implanted in the brain and activated by remote control to deliver drugs to brain cells. The technology, demonstrated for the first time in mice, one day may be used to treat pain, depression, epilepsy and other neurological disorders in people by targeting therapies to specific brain circuits.

9-Jul-2015 11:55 AM EDT
Researchers Find the “Acoustic Signature” of Screams
New York University

A team of NYU neuroscientists has identified the “acoustic signature” of screams, a study that points to the unique attributes of this form of expression and suggests we are able to generate sounds reserved exclusively for signaling distress.

Released: 16-Jul-2015 11:30 AM EDT
Job Strain Linked to Increased Sick Leave Due to Mental Disorders
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Workers with high job demands and job strain are at increased risk of sick leave due to mental disorders, reports a study in the August Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

9-Jul-2015 4:05 PM EDT
Alzheimer’s May Affect the Brain Differently in African-Americans than European-Americans
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Alzheimer’s disease may cause different changes in the brain, or pathologies, in African-Americans than in white Americans of European descent, according to a study published in the July 15, 2015, online issue of the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Drug Shows Promise as Single-Dose Cure and as Preventive Treatment for Malaria
Released: 15-Jul-2015 1:30 PM EDT
Drug Shows Promise as Single-Dose Cure and as Preventive Treatment for Malaria
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and in Australia have shown that a drug currently in testing shows potential to cure malaria in a single dose and offers promise as a preventive treatment as well.

Newswise: UGA Researchers Develop Breakthrough Tools in Fight Against Cryptosporidium
Released: 15-Jul-2015 1:05 PM EDT
UGA Researchers Develop Breakthrough Tools in Fight Against Cryptosporidium
University of Georgia

Researchers at the University of Georgia have developed new tools to study and genetically manipulate cryptosporidium. Their discoveries, published in the journal Nature, will ultimately help researchers find new treatments and vaccines for cryptosporidium, a major cause of disease and death in children under 2 years old.

Released: 15-Jul-2015 11:05 AM EDT
Half of Americans Over 40 Should Take Statins
Newswise

...as a cost effective prevention of more serious cardiovascular-related health issues

13-Jul-2015 11:30 AM EDT
Study Links Success in Adulthood to Childhood Psychiatric Health
Duke Health

Children with even mild or passing bouts of depression, anxiety and/or behavioral issues were more inclined to have serious problems that complicated their ability to lead successful lives as adults, according to research from Duke Medicine.

Released: 14-Jul-2015 5:05 PM EDT
Study Highlights Pneumonia Hospitalizations Among US Adults
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Newswise: Continued Destruction of Earth’s Plant Life Places Humankind in Jeopardy, Says UGA Research
Released: 14-Jul-2015 2:05 PM EDT
Continued Destruction of Earth’s Plant Life Places Humankind in Jeopardy, Says UGA Research
University of Georgia

Unless humans slow the destruction of Earth’s declining supply of plant life, civilization like it is now may become completely unsustainable, according to a paper published recently by University of Georgia researchers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

14-Jul-2015 9:00 AM EDT
Study Discovers Human Hands May Be More Primitive Than Chimp's
Stony Brook University

Today, Nature is publishing a paper "The evolution of human and ape hand proportions," a study that discovers that human hands may be more primitive than chimp's.

Newswise: More Precise Estimate of Avogadro's Number to Help Redefine Kilogram
9-Jul-2015 11:05 AM EDT
More Precise Estimate of Avogadro's Number to Help Redefine Kilogram
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

An ongoing international effort to redefine the kilogram by 2018 has been helped by recent efforts from a team researchers from Italy, Japan and Germany to correlate two of the most precise measurements of Avogadro's number and obtain one averaged value that can be used for future calculations. Their results are published this week in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, from AIP Publishing.

Released: 13-Jul-2015 12:05 PM EDT
3D Printers Poised to Have Major Implications for Food Manufacturing
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)

CHICAGO— The use of 3D printers has the potential to revolutionize the way food is manufactured within the next 10 to 20 years, impacting everything from how military personnel get food on the battlefield to how long it takes to get a meal from the computer to your table, according to a July 12th symposium at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Chicago.

3-Jul-2015 9:00 AM EDT
‘Here Comes the Sun’: Does Pop Music Have a ‘Rhythm of the Rain?’
University of Southampton

Weather is frequently portrayed in popular music, with a new scientific study finding over 750 popular music songs referring to weather, the most common being sun and rain, and blizzards being the least common.

Newswise: Simply Observing Men with Very Low- and Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Very Effective and Underused
Released: 6-Jul-2015 4:05 PM EDT
Simply Observing Men with Very Low- and Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Very Effective and Underused
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Monitoring men with very low- and low-risk prostate cancers using watchful waiting or active surveillance, called expectant management, is a useful approach for a large number of men with localized tumors and could spare them the debilitating side effects of aggressive treatments that are too often unnecessarily used in this patient population, a UCLA review of common practices in prostate cancer has found.

Newswise: Epigenetic Driver of Glioblastoma Provides New Therapeutic Target
Released: 6-Jul-2015 3:05 PM EDT
Epigenetic Driver of Glioblastoma Provides New Therapeutic Target
University of California San Diego Health

Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes — chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off.

Newswise: Autonomous Taxis Would Deliver Significant Environmental and Economic Benefits
2-Jul-2015 2:05 PM EDT
Autonomous Taxis Would Deliver Significant Environmental and Economic Benefits
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Imagine a fleet of driverless taxis roaming your city, ready to pick you up and take you to your destination at a moment’s notice. While this may seem fantastical, it may be only a matter of time before it becomes reality. And according to a new study from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, such a system would both be cost-effective and greatly reduce per-mile emissions of greenhouse gases.

Newswise: Midlife Changes in Alzheimer’s Biomarkers May Predict Dementia
3-Jul-2015 9:00 AM EDT
Midlife Changes in Alzheimer’s Biomarkers May Predict Dementia
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying brain scans and cerebrospinal fluid of healthy adults, scientists have shown that changes in key biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease during midlife may help identify those who will develop dementia years later, according to new research.

Newswise:Video Embedded safer-with-more-benefits-parents-vaccine-views-shifting
VIDEO
1-Jul-2015 8:00 AM EDT
Safer, with More Benefits: Parents’ Vaccine Views Shifting
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Over the same time period that multiple outbreaks of measles and whooping cough made headlines around the country, parents’ views on vaccines became more favorable.

Newswise: Aluminum Clusters Shut Down Molecular Fuel Factory
Released: 6-Jul-2015 6:00 AM EDT
Aluminum Clusters Shut Down Molecular Fuel Factory
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

When aluminum atoms bunch up, porous materials called zeolites lose their ability to convert oil to gasoline. An international team of scientists created the first 3-D atomic map of a zeolite in order to find out how to improve catalysts used to produce fuel, biofuel and other chemicals.

1-Jul-2015 10:00 AM EDT
Vanderbilt Research Could Lead to Vaccines and Treatment for Dengue Virus
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the National University of Singapore have determined the structure of a human monoclonal antibody which, in an animal model, strongly neutralizes a type of the potentially lethal dengue virus.

25-Jun-2015 4:05 PM EDT
Genes May Not Be to Blame for Link Between Migraine and Heart Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology® Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. Aura are sensations that come before the headache, often visual disturbances such as flashing lights.

24-Jun-2015 5:05 PM EDT
Statins Linked to Lower Aggression in Men, but Higher in Women
University of California San Diego Health

In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins.

Released: 1-Jul-2015 12:05 PM EDT
Men Referred for Borderline Testosterone Levels Have Higher Rates of Depression and Depressive Symptoms
George Washington University

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW), led by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., found that men referred for tertiary care for borderline testosterone levels had much higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms than those of the general population.

Newswise: Human Brain Study Sheds Light on How New Memories are Formed
24-Jun-2015 6:05 PM EDT
Human Brain Study Sheds Light on How New Memories are Formed
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases.

30-Jun-2015 11:00 AM EDT
Trends in Antipsychotic Medication Use in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults
Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults.

Released: 1-Jul-2015 9:05 AM EDT
Food Scientist Explains How Trans Fat Removal Will Affect Food Industry
Kansas State University

The FDA has given food companies three years to remove artificial trans fat from their products, but a Kansas State University food scientist explains most companies have already made the adjustment.

Newswise:Video Embedded thin-colorectal-cancer-patients-have-shorter-survival-than-obese-patients
VIDEO
1-Jul-2015 9:00 AM EDT
Thin Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Shorter Survival Than Obese Patients
Duke Health

Although being overweight with a high body-mass index (BMI) has long been associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer, thinner patients might not fare as well after treatment for advanced cancer, according to a new study from Duke Medicine.

Newswise: Obese Teens in Study Less Likely to Use Contraception
25-Jun-2015 8:00 AM EDT
Obese Teens in Study Less Likely to Use Contraception
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A study of nearly 1,000 teens found that obese adolescents were significantly less likely to use contraception than normal weight peers, putting them at higher risk of unintended pregnancy.

Released: 30-Jun-2015 3:05 PM EDT
Does Radiation From X-Rays and CT Scans Really Cause Cancer?
Loyola Medicine

Studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer have been widely reported. But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model, according to a recent article in the journal Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment.

Released: 30-Jun-2015 12:05 PM EDT
Study Suggests Link between Eye Color and Alcohol Dependence
University of Vermont

People with blue eyes might have a greater chance of becoming alcoholics, according to a unique new study by genetic researchers at the University of Vermont.

Newswise: Major Midwest Flood Risk Underestimated by as Much as Five Feet, Study Finds
Released: 30-Jun-2015 12:05 PM EDT
Major Midwest Flood Risk Underestimated by as Much as Five Feet, Study Finds
Washington University in St. Louis

As floodwaters surge along major rivers in the midwestern United States, a new study from Washington University in St. Louis suggests federal agencies are underestimating historic 100-year flood levels on these rivers by as much as five feet, a miscalculation that has serious implications for future flood risks, flood insurance and business development in an expanding floodplain.

25-Jun-2015 1:05 PM EDT
Repeated Courses of Antibiotics May Profoundly Alter Children’s Development
NYU Langone Health

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children’s development.

Released: 29-Jun-2015 2:05 PM EDT
Athletes Should Drink Only WhenThirsty, According to New Guidelines
Loyola Medicine

At least 14 deaths of endurance athletes have been attributed to exercise-associated hyponatremia, which results from drinking too much water. But there’s an easy way to prevent hyponatremia, according to new expert guidelines: Simply put, drink only when you’re thirsty.

Released: 29-Jun-2015 1:05 PM EDT
Experts Cover MERS Outbreak in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

An overview and analysis of the factors underlying the recent Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak in Korea has been published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Newswise: New Role for Twitter: Early Warning System for Bad Drug Interactions
Released: 29-Jun-2015 12:45 PM EDT
New Role for Twitter: Early Warning System for Bad Drug Interactions
University of Vermont

Vermont scientists have invented a new technique for discovering potentially dangerous drug interactions--before they show up in medical databases like PubMed--by searching millions of tweets on Twitter.

Newswise: Research Finds Males and Females Process Chronic Pain Differently
Released: 29-Jun-2015 12:05 PM EDT
Research Finds Males and Females Process Chronic Pain Differently
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Male and female mice use different immune cells to process chronic pain, indicating that different therapies for different genders could better target the problem.

Newswise: Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor May Take Smartphone Security to New Level
25-Jun-2015 11:05 AM EDT
Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor May Take Smartphone Security to New Level
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A new ultrasonic fingerprint sensor measures 3-D image of your finger’s surface and the tissue beneath it—enhancing biometrics and information security for smartphones and other devices

Newswise: New Nanogenerator Harvests Power From Rolling Tires
Released: 29-Jun-2015 10:05 AM EDT
New Nanogenerator Harvests Power From Rolling Tires
University of Wisconsin-Madison

A group of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers and a collaborator from China have developed a nanogenerator that harvests energy from a car's rolling tire friction.

Released: 29-Jun-2015 10:00 AM EDT
'Drink When Thirsty' to Avoid Fatal Drops in Blood Sodium Levels During Exercise
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

For hikers, football players, endurance athletes, and a growing range of elite and recreational exercisers, the best approach to preventing potentially serious reductions in blood sodium level is to drink when thirsty, according to an updated consensus statement on exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH). The recommendations appear in the June issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 29-Jun-2015 5:05 AM EDT
Osteoporosis Linked with Heart Disease in Older People
University of Southampton

University of Southampton scientists have discovered a link between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis, suggesting both conditions could have similar causes.


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