Feature Channels: Trauma

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Released: 17-May-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Stress could make us more likable, and other Behavioral Science news tips
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise.

Newswise: Scientists See Signs of Traumatic Brain Injury in Headbutting Muskox
Released: 17-May-2022 12:25 PM EDT
Scientists See Signs of Traumatic Brain Injury in Headbutting Muskox
Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai saw for the first time hallmarks of concussions and other head trauma in the brains of deceased headbutting animals—muskoxen and bighorn sheep. The results published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica may contradict the commonly-held belief that ramming animals do not suffer brain injuries and support the notion that studies on animals with brains evolutionarily similar to those of humans may help researchers understand and reduce traumatic brain injuries.

Released: 17-May-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Predictable Home Environment Protects Against Development of Heart Disease Risk Factors After Child Abuse
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Studies have demonstrated that exposure to physical and psychological abuse in childhood is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes. A new study shows for the first time that well-organized households protect children who have experienced abuse from developing some precursors to heart disease.

Released: 12-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Albert Einstein College of Medicine Receives $11 Million Grant to Tackle Post-Traumatic Epilepsy
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Approximately 1 in 50 people who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) will develop post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE)—with the risk of PTE significantly higher in people with severe TBI. PTE is characterized by recurring seizures that begin a week or more after the brain injury, and there is currently no way to identify those at risk for developing PTE or to prevent its onset.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Stop the Bleed training saves lives
Released: 12-May-2022 9:30 AM EDT
The Medical Minute: Stop the Bleed training saves lives
Penn State Health

A child who’d been struck by a car was in serious danger. Luckily, a police officer had been trained in Stop the Bleed. How a 90-minute course can save lives in this week’s Medical Minute.

9-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Increased Risk of Dementia After Hospitalization for Major TBI
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have been hospitalized for a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a higher risk of developing dementia when compared to people who do not have a TBI, according to a new study published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 10-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Discovery in the brains of army veterans with chronic pain could pave way for personalized treatments
Frontiers

A new study is the first to investigate brain connectivity patterns at rest in veterans with both chronic pain and trauma, finding three unique brain subtypes potentially indicating high, medium, and low susceptibility to pain and trauma symptoms.

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Offers Program to Catch Older Adults Before They Fall
Released: 6-May-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Offers Program to Catch Older Adults Before They Fall
Cedars-Sinai

Falls and broken bones are common among older adults, but they're not a natural part of aging. That's why Cedars-Sinai geriatricians created a bone health and falls risk consultation program to catch at-risk people before they break a bone or help them avoid another fracture in the future.

Released: 3-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
US regions with lax gun control laws bear brunt of firearm injury costs
BMJ

US regions with lax gun control laws are bearing the brunt of firearm injury costs, with tax- funded dollars providing almost half of the total, finds research published in the open access journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.

Released: 2-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
One-Sport High School Athletes Prone to Injury, Burnout
University of Georgia

High school students who focus on one sport are more likely to get injured or suffer from burnout. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests their motivation for specializing in one sport is pure: love of the game and competition.

Released: 2-May-2022 3:00 PM EDT
ACS Committee on Trauma announces release of the revised National Guideline for the Field Triage of Injured Patients
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

To improve clinical outcomes, a process of field triage is needed to identify seriously injured patients and quickly transport them to the appropriate care facility.

Released: 2-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
May observes National STOP THE BLEED month, with a special commemoration set on May 19
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

May 19 will observe the fifth annual National STOP THE BLEED® Day, which falls during the broader observance of National STOP THE BLEED® Month in May.

Newswise: 220216_Cohen_Silver_4218_sz-768x508.jpg
Released: 2-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
NSF supports research studying how Russia’s invasion of Ukraine affects Americans
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 2, 2022 — The National Science Foundation has awarded a Rapid Response Research grant of nearly $175,000 to University of California, Irvine researchers seeking to gauge the effect that the reporting of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in traditional and social media outlets has on the mental health of U.S. citizens.

Released: 2-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
‘Resetting’ the Injured Brain Offers Clues for Concussion Treatment
Ohio State University

New research in mice raises the prospects for development of post-concussion therapies that could ward off cognitive decline and depression, two common conditions among people who have experienced a moderate traumatic brain injury.

Newswise: Loyola Medicine Opens Clinic at MacNeal Hospital to 
Provide Forensic Evaluations for Asylum Seekers
Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Loyola Medicine Opens Clinic at MacNeal Hospital to Provide Forensic Evaluations for Asylum Seekers
Loyola Medicine

Loyola Medicine recently opened the Loyola Medicine Asylum Clinic at MacNeal Hospital. Founded by Yessenia Castro-Caballero, MD, FAAP, and Amy Blair, MD, FAAFP, the clinic provides evidence-based medical examinations for asylum seekers.

Newswise: Study: Unprecedented Increase in Number of Border Wall Falls and Trauma
Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study: Unprecedented Increase in Number of Border Wall Falls and Trauma
University of California San Diego Health

Trauma physicians at UC San Diego Health attribute the rise in injuries to a height increase of the border wall at U.S.-Mexico border.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New study finds childhood abuse linked to higher risk for high cholesterol as an adult
American Heart Association (AHA)

A new study found risk factors for heart disease and stroke were higher among adults who said they experienced childhood abuse and varied by race and gender.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Almost 90% of autistic women report experiencing sexual violence, often on multiple occasions
Frontiers

As many as nine out of 10 autistic women in France report have suffered sexual violence, shows a new study in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Young Mothers with Children by Multiple Partners More Likely to Experience Abuse, Rutgers Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Younger mothers with children by multiple fathers are more likely to experience psychological or physical harassment, economic abuse and sexual violence than younger mothers who have children with only one partner, a new Rutgers study finds.

Newswise: On a mission: U-M orthopaedic surgeons look to expand program abroad
Released: 18-Apr-2022 5:05 AM EDT
On a mission: U-M orthopaedic surgeons look to expand program abroad
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Each year, a team from University of Michigan Health's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery travel to the Dominican Republic for a medical mission, where the operate on local patients at an under-resourced hospital. Ahead of another mission, leaders are looking to grow the program by adding more trips and resources, as well as partnering with more institutions.

14-Apr-2022 12:05 AM EDT
Study uses machine-learning approach to calculate risk for veteran homelessness
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

In the U.S. today, there are an estimated 1.4 million homeless veterans, which makes up about eight percent of the country’s homeless population. Though it has been difficult to accurately predict homelessness before it occurs, a new collaborative study using a “personalized medicine” approach, led by the Uniformed Services University (USU), suggests self-reported lifetime depression and posttraumatic stress disorder were among the most important factors that put veterans at risk for becoming homeless.

Released: 13-Apr-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Childhood trauma key indicator of suicide ideation in college students
Trinity College Dublin

New research from the School of Psychology at Trinity College Dublin has shown that cumulative exposure to childhood trauma was a key indicator of suicide ideation among university students.

Newswise: L.A.’s injury rate from e-scooters may exceed national rate for motorcycles
4-Apr-2022 9:00 AM EDT
L.A.’s injury rate from e-scooters may exceed national rate for motorcycles
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For a recent six-year period, the injury rate for riders of electric scooters in one section of Los Angeles was higher than the national rates for riders of motorcycles, bicycles and cars, and pedestrians.

5-Apr-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Diagnosing Sports-Related Concussions May Be Harder than Thought
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The tool being used to diagnose concussions might be overestimating the condition and wrongly identifying symptoms like fatigue and neck pain caused from intense exercise and not a brain injury, according to Rutgers researchers. This new research raises new questions about the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), a questionnaire widely used along with other methods to diagnose concussions sustained during sports. Findings were presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting April 5.

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Diagnosing Sports-Related Concussions May Be Harder than Previously Thought
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

In a new study, many athletes reported symptoms that are often used to diagnose concussions even though they did not suffer a head injury. The findings suggest that some symptoms, such as fatigue and neck pain, could be attributed to intense exercise rather than a brain injury.

Newswise:Video Embedded exercise-improves-health-markers-in-young-female-survivors-of-childhood-trauma
VIDEO
25-Mar-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Exercise Improves Health Markers in Young Female Survivors of Childhood Trauma
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research shows a progressive exercise training program mitigates some physiological and psychological effects of adverse childhood experiences in otherwise healthy young women. The study will be presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Newswise:Video Embedded university-of-kentucky-patient-domestic-violence-survivor-triumphs-one-step-at-a-time
VIDEO
Released: 1-Apr-2022 1:05 PM EDT
University of Kentucky Patient, Domestic Violence Survivor Triumphs, One Step at a Time
University of Kentucky

In 2013, April Ballentine’s ex-boyfriend shot her five times in public. Though she survived – barely – the event left her paralyzed from the chest down. April channeled her trauma into a force for good, becoming an advocate for victims of domestic violence and volunteering at the local rehabilitation facility to help teach physical therapy students how to work with paralyzed patients.

Released: 1-Apr-2022 11:30 AM EDT
How to Keep Children Safe from Window Falls
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Each year, about eight children ages 5 or younger die and 3,300 require emergency treatment after falling from a window, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. To bring attention to the risks, the National Safety Association has designated the first week of April as Window Safety Week. Virteeka Sinha, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and a pediatric emergency physician at University Hospital, has seen these injuries first-hand. She is studying hospital data on window falls to aid in prevention.

Newswise: Findings From Brain Studies Shed Light on the Mystery of Consciousness After Brain Injury
Released: 30-Mar-2022 7:05 PM EDT
Findings From Brain Studies Shed Light on the Mystery of Consciousness After Brain Injury
Stony Brook University

Researchers in the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University have found that by using technologies to monitor brain functions after traumatic brain injury, scientists may be able to better predict who will “wake up” after TBI and what brain circuits to target to potentially treat disorders of consciousness.

Newswise: Iowa State researcher leads emerging field of trauma-informed environmental design
Released: 29-Mar-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Iowa State researcher leads emerging field of trauma-informed environmental design
Iowa State University

An Iowa State University researcher is an innovator in an emerging field: trauma-informed environmental design, in which designers work to understand their clients deeply and how their life experiences affect how they experience various environments today in order to better serve them in the design process.

Released: 29-Mar-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Nearly 1 in 3 patients involved in a car crash during their lifetime admit distracted driving
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

About 18% of patients with injuries sustained in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) acknowledge that distracted driving contributed to the crash – although the true rate is likely even higher, according to a report in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Researchers Developing System for Delivering IGF-1 Nanoparticles to Patients with Nerve Injury
21-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Developing System for Delivering IGF-1 Nanoparticles to Patients with Nerve Injury
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD, are developing a drug delivery system that can deliver nanoparticles containing IGF-1 to injured nerves to help them heal.

Newswise: Mindfulness Alleviates Post-Gun Violence Trauma and Depression
Released: 22-Mar-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Mindfulness Alleviates Post-Gun Violence Trauma and Depression
University of California San Diego Health

A UC San Diego pilot study on parents of mass shooting victims finds that eight weeks of mindfulness training is effective in reducing trauma, depression, stress and grief caused by gun violence.

Released: 21-Mar-2022 11:35 AM EDT
ACS Committee on Trauma Releases New Standards For Care of the Injured Patient
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS COT) released its new standards for care of the injured patient in Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient (2022 Standards), now in its seventh edition.

Released: 18-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Federal mental health, trauma experts offer Ukrainian-related resources
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

In response to the humanitarian crisis in Eastern Europe, several centers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) have developed Ukrainian-translated resources for traumatic blood loss and mental health.

Released: 16-Mar-2022 11:35 AM EDT
ACS Committee on Trauma celebrates 100 years of quality care for injured patients
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma kicked off its 100-year anniversary during last week’s ACS COT Annual Meeting in Seattle

Released: 15-Mar-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Delayed recovery of consciousness is common for COVID patients on respirators
Weill Cornell Medicine

Most patients with severe COVID who are put on ventilators regain consciousness after removal of respiratory support, but recovery may take weeks after the period of mechanical ventilation has ended, according to a new study by investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Harvard Medical School, NewYork-Presbyterian and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Released: 10-Mar-2022 12:05 AM EST
Inflation, war push stress to alarming levels at two-year COVID-19 anniversary
American Psychological Association (APA)

Two years after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic, inflation, money issues and the war in Ukraine have pushed U.S. stress to alarming levels, according to polls conducted for the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Experts Available to Discuss MS, Epilepsy and Brain Injuries During March Awareness Months
Released: 8-Mar-2022 3:50 PM EST
Experts Available to Discuss MS, Epilepsy and Brain Injuries During March Awareness Months
Cedars-Sinai

The brain is front and center during March, and experts from the Cedars-Sinai departments of Neurology & Neurosurgery are available for interviews about the latest research and treatments for neurological diseases and conditions, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and traumatic brain injuries.

Released: 8-Mar-2022 10:25 AM EST
Follow-up shows 'very high odds' of long-term disability for veterans with combat concussion
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Service members who sustained combat-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Iraq or Afghanistan are at high risk of long-term disability – up to 49 times higher than in other groups of deployed veterans, reports a study in the March/April issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 7-Mar-2022 3:30 PM EST
Providing Care to Refugees, Others Affected by Violence in Ukraine Must Be a Global Priority: American Thoracic Society
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Today, the American Thoracic Society joined the chorus of voices worldwide condemning the violence in Ukraine.

Newswise: Rutgers Researchers Harness AI and Robotics to Treat Spinal Cord Injuries
Released: 7-Mar-2022 9:45 AM EST
Rutgers Researchers Harness AI and Robotics to Treat Spinal Cord Injuries
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

By employing artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics to formulate therapeutic proteins, a team led by Rutgers researchers has successfully stabilized an enzyme able to degrade scar tissue resulting from spinal cord injuries and promote tissue regeneration. The study, recently published in Advanced Healthcare Materials, details the team’s ground-breaking stabilization of the enzyme Chondroitinase ABC, (ChABC) offering new hope for patients coping with spinal cord injuries.

23-Feb-2022 9:55 AM EST
Additional Years of Ice Hockey Play May Be Linked to Greater Chance of CTE
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a degenerative brain disease linked to the repetitive head impacts that athletes get from playing contact sports. According to a new preliminary study, each additional year of playing ice hockey may increase a person’s chance of developing CTE by about 23%. The research being released today, March 2, 2022, will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 74th Annual Meeting being held in person in Seattle, April 2 to 7, 2022 and virtually, April 24 to 26, 2022.

Newswise:Video Embedded trauma-patients-were-less-likely-to-be-vaccinated-against-covid-19-even-as-vaccines-became-more-widely-available
VIDEO
Released: 2-Mar-2022 2:30 PM EST
Trauma patients were less likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 even as vaccines became more widely available
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Trauma patients treated and hospitalized in a Tennessee medical center had a 33% lower rate of COVID-19 vaccination than non-trauma patients who were hospitalized following treatment in the emergency department.


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