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Newswise: Tips on Firework Safety from Doctors at the Midwest's Largest Burn Center
Released: 29-Jun-2022 9:45 AM EDT
Tips on Firework Safety from Doctors at the Midwest's Largest Burn Center
Loyola Medicine

Every Fourth of July weekend, millions gather to enjoy fireworks in cities and towns across the country, but for those who create their own displays, the holiday can be dangerous. "Emergency rooms and burn centers see a significant increase in patients presenting with firework injuries in the month around July 4," said Mark Cichon, DO, chair of emergency medicine at Loyola Medicine. According to Dr. Cichon, eye injuries, hearing issues and finger and hand injuries are the most common.

Released: 27-Jun-2022 1:45 PM EDT
The latest expert commentary on SCOTUS decisions, including the overturn of Roe v. Wade
Newswise

The latest expert commentary and research on SCOTUS decisions, including the overturn of Roe v. Wade

20-Jun-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Military Sexual Trauma Impacts Both Genders, Men May Misuse Alcohol More Than Women
Research Society on Alcoholism

Military sexual trauma (MST) can have a corrosive impact on trust within the U.S. military, as well as a number of negative effects on the individual. A recent study has examined the prevalence of MST history among U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard (USAR/NG) soldiers, the extent to which MST history predicts risk for alcohol misuse and problems, and potential sex differences in these experiences and outcomes. Findings indicate that MST is alarmingly prevalent for both female and male service members; in fact, the prevalence of MST appears to be much higher for male service members than is often reported.

19-Jun-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Trauma History and Alcohol’s Effects on the Brain Combine to Make Women More Vulnerable to Alcohol Use Disorders
Research Society on Alcoholism

Prior research has demonstrated greater addiction vulnerability in women; for example, women advance from casual substance use to addiction at a faster rate, experience more severe withdrawal symptoms, exhibit higher rates of relapse, and have less treatment success than men. A new study shows that biobehavioral interactions in alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among women are cyclical in nature: women’s greater risk of personal histories of trauma coupled with a greater vulnerability to alcohol-related brain deficits can lead to more severe AUD effects.

Released: 24-Jun-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Top 4 Gun Violence Experts List
Newswise

Checkout Newswise list of top four Gun Control/Gun Violence Experts from leading universities, colleges and institutions, spreading awareness about gun violence.

Released: 23-Jun-2022 2:50 PM EDT
American College of Surgeons Supports Bipartisan Senate Legislation (S. 2938) to Make Firearm Ownership and Communities Safer
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Today, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) voiced its support for the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (S. 2938), introduced in the Senate earlier this week.

Newswise: $2.3 million NIH grant to fund research on ’smart’ knee replacements
Released: 21-Jun-2022 9:05 AM EDT
$2.3 million NIH grant to fund research on ’smart’ knee replacements
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a five-year, $2,326,521 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to further her research into smart knee replacements.

Newswise: Physical Intimate Partner Violence in Colombia Costs $90 Million Annually 
Released: 17-Jun-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Physical Intimate Partner Violence in Colombia Costs $90 Million Annually 
Washington University in St. Louis

The single-year health burden associated with physical intimate partner violence in the South American country of Colombia was $90.6 million, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 13-Jun-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Healthy Human Brains Are Hotter Than Previously Thought, Exceeding 40 Degrees
UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)

New research has shown that normal human brain temperature varies much more than we thought, and this could be a sign of healthy brain function.

Released: 9-Jun-2022 6:05 AM EDT
CTE ‘uncommon’ in service member brains, most associated with civilian activities, DoD study finds
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is uncommon in service members, and is more strongly linked to civilian traumatic brain injuries, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on June 9 by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. The study, “Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in the Brains of Military Personnel,” was led by Dr. David Priemer, assistant professor of Pathology at USU and neuropathologist for the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, and Dr. Dan Perl, professor of Pathology and director of the Department of Defense/USU Brain Tissue Repository at USU.

Newswise: Grand View Health and Penn Medicine Extend Strategic Alliance Until 2027
Released: 7-Jun-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Grand View Health and Penn Medicine Extend Strategic Alliance Until 2027
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In August 2018, Penn Medicine and Grand View Health set a vision to develop collaborative services at Grand View Hospital in an effort to provide comprehensive care that kept patients closer to home. Four years later, the relationship is flourishing, with programs in Cancer (including Radiation Oncology), Trauma, Neurosciences, and Orthopaedics. Early this month, the two organizations signed a renewal of their strategic alliance for five more years.

Released: 2-Jun-2022 3:05 PM EDT
American College of Surgeons calls for urgent, bipartisan action to address the firearm violence public health crisis
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Today, leaders from the American College of Surgeons (ACS) called for bipartisan solutions to reduce the rising numbers of deaths and serious injuries that are arriving in trauma centers on a daily basis due to firearm violence.

Released: 2-Jun-2022 12:05 PM EDT
U of U Health Leads Effort to Improve Emergency Response in Rwanda
University of Utah Health

University of Utah researchers are at the forefront of an effort to create more efficient communications system in Rwanda capable locating patients faster, stabilizing them quickly, and directing the ambulance to the right hospital. In time, the researchers say these improvements could be implemented in other low- or middle-income countries

1-Jun-2022 1:10 PM EDT
NEWS CONFERENCE – Accelerating Our Response to America’s Firearm Public Health Crisis
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

During this news conference, leaders from the American College of Surgeons and its Committee on Trauma (ACS COT) will provide an overview of important steps that can be taken to accelerate an effective response to America’s firearm injury and death crisis.

Newswise: Mount Sinai Leads Multi-Site Study Evaluating a Novel Intervention Designed to Improve Community Re-Entry Outcomes for Justice-Involved Individuals With Brain Injuries
Released: 31-May-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Leads Multi-Site Study Evaluating a Novel Intervention Designed to Improve Community Re-Entry Outcomes for Justice-Involved Individuals With Brain Injuries
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers from the Brain Injury Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections (PADOC) and the Brain Injury Assocation of Pennsylvania (BIAPA), have launched a rigorous research study to reduce recidivism, or re-offending, among people with brain injury who are leaving incarceration.

Released: 27-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
STOP THE BLEED instructors available for media interviews as National STOP THE BLEED Month draws to a close
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Instructors from the American College of Surgeons STOP THE BLEED® program are available for media interviews as the nation observes National STOP THE BLEED® Month in May.

Newswise: Trauma Study Aims to Improve Survival for Bleeding Patients
Released: 27-May-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Trauma Study Aims to Improve Survival for Bleeding Patients
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Emergency Medicine and Trauma Surgery researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) are joining Vanderbilt LifeFlight in a Department of Defense (DOD)-funded clinical trial aimed at improving survival with resuscitation techniques used to keep patients alive after a traumatic injury.

Released: 26-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Updated Media Briefings: APS 2022 Annual Convention
Association for Psychological Science

Briefing 1: Friday, May 27, 10 a.m. CDT; Briefing 2: Saturday, May 28, 11 a.m. CDT. Registration: Journalists should contact to attend the virtual briefings.

Newswise: FAU Awarded $1 Million to Help Prevent Injury, 
Death from Falls in Older Adults
Released: 26-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Awarded $1 Million to Help Prevent Injury, Death from Falls in Older Adults
Florida Atlantic University

Every second, an older person in the U.S. falls and injures themselves, and every 20 minutes one of them dies from the fall. The Geriatric Emergency Department Fall Injury Prevention Project will investigate several emergency department-based prevention strategies in older patients at high risk for recurrent falls and injury. The tailored multicomponent intervention will identify effective fall prevention strategies that target limited resources to high-risk individuals who come to the emergency department to improve patient outcomes, improve safety, and reduce overall costs of health care.

Released: 17-May-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Stress could make us more likable, and other Behavioral Science news tips
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise.

Newswise: Scientists See Signs of Traumatic Brain Injury in Headbutting Muskox
Released: 17-May-2022 12:25 PM EDT
Scientists See Signs of Traumatic Brain Injury in Headbutting Muskox
Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai saw for the first time hallmarks of concussions and other head trauma in the brains of deceased headbutting animals—muskoxen and bighorn sheep. The results published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica may contradict the commonly-held belief that ramming animals do not suffer brain injuries and support the notion that studies on animals with brains evolutionarily similar to those of humans may help researchers understand and reduce traumatic brain injuries.

Released: 17-May-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Predictable Home Environment Protects Against Development of Heart Disease Risk Factors After Child Abuse
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Studies have demonstrated that exposure to physical and psychological abuse in childhood is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes. A new study shows for the first time that well-organized households protect children who have experienced abuse from developing some precursors to heart disease.

Released: 12-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Albert Einstein College of Medicine Receives $11 Million Grant to Tackle Post-Traumatic Epilepsy
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Approximately 1 in 50 people who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) will develop post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE)—with the risk of PTE significantly higher in people with severe TBI. PTE is characterized by recurring seizures that begin a week or more after the brain injury, and there is currently no way to identify those at risk for developing PTE or to prevent its onset.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Stop the Bleed training saves lives
Released: 12-May-2022 9:30 AM EDT
The Medical Minute: Stop the Bleed training saves lives
Penn State Health

A child who’d been struck by a car was in serious danger. Luckily, a police officer had been trained in Stop the Bleed. How a 90-minute course can save lives in this week’s Medical Minute.

9-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Study Finds Increased Risk of Dementia After Hospitalization for Major TBI
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have been hospitalized for a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a higher risk of developing dementia when compared to people who do not have a TBI, according to a new study published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 10-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Discovery in the brains of army veterans with chronic pain could pave way for personalized treatments
Frontiers

A new study is the first to investigate brain connectivity patterns at rest in veterans with both chronic pain and trauma, finding three unique brain subtypes potentially indicating high, medium, and low susceptibility to pain and trauma symptoms.

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Offers Program to Catch Older Adults Before They Fall
Released: 6-May-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Offers Program to Catch Older Adults Before They Fall
Cedars-Sinai

Falls and broken bones are common among older adults, but they're not a natural part of aging. That's why Cedars-Sinai geriatricians created a bone health and falls risk consultation program to catch at-risk people before they break a bone or help them avoid another fracture in the future.

Released: 3-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
US regions with lax gun control laws bear brunt of firearm injury costs
BMJ

US regions with lax gun control laws are bearing the brunt of firearm injury costs, with tax- funded dollars providing almost half of the total, finds research published in the open access journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.

Released: 2-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
One-Sport High School Athletes Prone to Injury, Burnout
University of Georgia

High school students who focus on one sport are more likely to get injured or suffer from burnout. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests their motivation for specializing in one sport is pure: love of the game and competition.

Released: 2-May-2022 3:00 PM EDT
ACS Committee on Trauma announces release of the revised National Guideline for the Field Triage of Injured Patients
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

To improve clinical outcomes, a process of field triage is needed to identify seriously injured patients and quickly transport them to the appropriate care facility.

Released: 2-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
May observes National STOP THE BLEED month, with a special commemoration set on May 19
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

May 19 will observe the fifth annual National STOP THE BLEED® Day, which falls during the broader observance of National STOP THE BLEED® Month in May.

Newswise: 220216_Cohen_Silver_4218_sz-768x508.jpg
Released: 2-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
NSF supports research studying how Russia’s invasion of Ukraine affects Americans
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 2, 2022 — The National Science Foundation has awarded a Rapid Response Research grant of nearly $175,000 to University of California, Irvine researchers seeking to gauge the effect that the reporting of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in traditional and social media outlets has on the mental health of U.S. citizens.

Released: 2-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
‘Resetting’ the Injured Brain Offers Clues for Concussion Treatment
Ohio State University

New research in mice raises the prospects for development of post-concussion therapies that could ward off cognitive decline and depression, two common conditions among people who have experienced a moderate traumatic brain injury.

Newswise: Loyola Medicine Opens Clinic at MacNeal Hospital to 
Provide Forensic Evaluations for Asylum Seekers
Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Loyola Medicine Opens Clinic at MacNeal Hospital to Provide Forensic Evaluations for Asylum Seekers
Loyola Medicine

Loyola Medicine recently opened the Loyola Medicine Asylum Clinic at MacNeal Hospital. Founded by Yessenia Castro-Caballero, MD, FAAP, and Amy Blair, MD, FAAFP, the clinic provides evidence-based medical examinations for asylum seekers.

Newswise: Study: Unprecedented Increase in Number of Border Wall Falls and Trauma
Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study: Unprecedented Increase in Number of Border Wall Falls and Trauma
University of California San Diego Health

Trauma physicians at UC San Diego Health attribute the rise in injuries to a height increase of the border wall at U.S.-Mexico border.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New study finds childhood abuse linked to higher risk for high cholesterol as an adult
American Heart Association (AHA)

A new study found risk factors for heart disease and stroke were higher among adults who said they experienced childhood abuse and varied by race and gender.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Almost 90% of autistic women report experiencing sexual violence, often on multiple occasions
Frontiers

As many as nine out of 10 autistic women in France report have suffered sexual violence, shows a new study in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Young Mothers with Children by Multiple Partners More Likely to Experience Abuse, Rutgers Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Younger mothers with children by multiple fathers are more likely to experience psychological or physical harassment, economic abuse and sexual violence than younger mothers who have children with only one partner, a new Rutgers study finds.

Newswise: On a mission: U-M orthopaedic surgeons look to expand program abroad
Released: 18-Apr-2022 5:05 AM EDT
On a mission: U-M orthopaedic surgeons look to expand program abroad
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Each year, a team from University of Michigan Health's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery travel to the Dominican Republic for a medical mission, where the operate on local patients at an under-resourced hospital. Ahead of another mission, leaders are looking to grow the program by adding more trips and resources, as well as partnering with more institutions.

14-Apr-2022 12:05 AM EDT
Study uses machine-learning approach to calculate risk for veteran homelessness
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

In the U.S. today, there are an estimated 1.4 million homeless veterans, which makes up about eight percent of the country’s homeless population. Though it has been difficult to accurately predict homelessness before it occurs, a new collaborative study using a “personalized medicine” approach, led by the Uniformed Services University (USU), suggests self-reported lifetime depression and posttraumatic stress disorder were among the most important factors that put veterans at risk for becoming homeless.

Released: 13-Apr-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Childhood trauma key indicator of suicide ideation in college students
Trinity College Dublin

New research from the School of Psychology at Trinity College Dublin has shown that cumulative exposure to childhood trauma was a key indicator of suicide ideation among university students.

Newswise: L.A.’s injury rate from e-scooters may exceed national rate for motorcycles
4-Apr-2022 9:00 AM EDT
L.A.’s injury rate from e-scooters may exceed national rate for motorcycles
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For a recent six-year period, the injury rate for riders of electric scooters in one section of Los Angeles was higher than the national rates for riders of motorcycles, bicycles and cars, and pedestrians.

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Diagnosing Sports-Related Concussions May Be Harder than Previously Thought
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

In a new study, many athletes reported symptoms that are often used to diagnose concussions even though they did not suffer a head injury. The findings suggest that some symptoms, such as fatigue and neck pain, could be attributed to intense exercise rather than a brain injury.

5-Apr-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Diagnosing Sports-Related Concussions May Be Harder than Thought
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The tool being used to diagnose concussions might be overestimating the condition and wrongly identifying symptoms like fatigue and neck pain caused from intense exercise and not a brain injury, according to Rutgers researchers. This new research raises new questions about the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), a questionnaire widely used along with other methods to diagnose concussions sustained during sports. Findings were presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting April 5.


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