Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1540
GeoheritageTour201707260014.jpg

Article ID: 693221

Meditation Could Help Anxiety and Cardiovascular Health

Michigan Technological University

In a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers.

Released:
20-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
spine_deformed_rod_iStock-152149532.jpg

Article ID: 692743

Evidence Mounts that Daily Opioid Users May Fare Worse After Spine Surgery, Study Finds

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a multicenter database study of adults who had undergone surgery for spinal deformities, researchers say that those who had used narcotics daily on average had worse outcomes, such as longer intensive care unit stays and more severe postop disability, compared with those who did not use opioids preoperatively.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692624

Sitting Is Bad for Your Brain – Not Just Your Metabolism or Heart

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Sitting, like smoking, increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and premature death. Researchers at UCLA wanted to see how sedentary behavior influences brain health, especially regions of the brain that are critical to memory formation.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 3:25 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
NorovirusTHIS.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692632

How Highly Contagious Norovirus Infection Gets Its Start

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Inside tuft cells, norovirus is effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These “healthy carriers” are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 4:15 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Mar-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691457

Whether Sustained or Sporadic, Exercise Offers Same Reductions in Death Risk

Duke Health

New data shows that all moderate or vigorous exercise can add up to reduce the risk of disease or death, even if you are exercising only in short bursts throughout the day.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 1:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 690583

Bright Nighttime Light Kills Melatonin Production in Preschoolers

University of Colorado Boulder

A new CU Boulder study shows that one hour of bright light at night nearly eliminates melatonin production in young children and keeps it suppressed an hour after light's out. Structural differences may make children's immature eyes more vulnerable to body clock disruption from light.

Released:
6-Mar-2018 5:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Doctor_LGBT_Flag_iStock-536219639TW.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    28-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 690094

Records Study Suggests Gender Affirming Surgeries On The Rise Along with Insurance Coverage

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a national medical records analysis, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say there is evidence that the number of gender affirming surgeries performed in hospitals for transgender individuals is on the rise, along with increased access made possible by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance coverage for the procedures.

Released:
26-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 689909

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Without Intravenous Contrast May Help Better Assess Need for Mitral Valve Surgery

Atlantic Health System

Atlantic health system cardiologist authors new review on value of non-invasive imaging techniques in valvular heart disease patients

Released:
22-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
GU_TherapeuticGelB.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689759

New Therapeutic Gel Shows Promise Against Cancerous Tumors

University of North Carolina Health Care System

UNC and NC State scientists created an injectable gel-like scaffold that can hold combination chemo-immunotherapeutic drugs and deliver them locally to tumors in a sequential manner. The results in animal models suggest this approach could one day ramp up therapeutic benefits for cancer patients.

Released:
19-Feb-2018 11:30 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 12:15 AM EST

Article ID: 689679

African Americans with Atrial Fibrillation at Significantly Higher Risk for Stroke Compared to Caucasians with the Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

African Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) – a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications – have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The new findings build on previous studies examining the impact of race on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), which is linked to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other complications. It’s well reported that African Americans have a lower risk of developing AF as compared to Caucasians, but until now, there was little data on the additional risks that come with AF for each race.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 1540





Chat now!