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110 of 570
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Mar-2019 12:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 709733

Particulate air pollution linked with reduced sperm production in mice

Endocrine Society

Exposure to tiny air pollution particles may lead to reduced sperm production, suggests new research in mice to be presented Monday, March 25 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709850

Medicine and Personal Care Products May Lead to New Pollutants in Waterways

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

When you flush the toilet, you probably don’t think about the traces of the medicine and personal care products in your body that are winding up in sewage treatment plants, streams, rivers, lakes, bays and the ocean. But Rutgers scientists have found that bacteria in sewage treatment plants may be creating new contaminants that have not been evaluated for potential risks and may affect aquatic environments, according to a study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709964

Turn off a light, save a life, says new UW–Madison study

University of Wisconsin-Madison

We all know that turning off lights and buying energy-efficient appliances affects our financial bottom line. Now, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers, we know that saving energy also saves lives and even more money for consumers by alleviating the costs of adverse health effects attributed to air pollution.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709841

Walmart Foundation grant aimed at reducing plastic waste

University of Georgia

An $800,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation to the University of Georgia New Materials Institute will help researchers understand how multilayer plastic packaging biodegrades and also help manufacturers in their attempts to design and select more sustainable materials.

Released:
19-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 709772

Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change

University of Exeter

A team of four scientists from the US and the UK explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change, in a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 3:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 709348

Air Pollution May Impact Fetal Cardiovascular System, Rutgers Study Says

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Microscopic particles in air pollution inhaled by pregnant women may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a study by Rutgers researchers.

Released:
11-Mar-2019 12:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Mar-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 709254

Academic Performance of Urban Children with Asthma Worse Than Peers Without Asthma

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A new study shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, suffer academically. Kids who are kept home due to asthma symptoms often aren’t able to do as well in the classroom.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 709327

Vitamin D may protect against pollution-associated asthma symptoms in obese children

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution. The study out of John Hopkins University School of Medicine, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, was published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

Released:
8-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 709239

Engineered Microbe May Be Key to Producing Plastic From Plants

University of Wisconsin-Madison

With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable — but frustratingly untapped — bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics.

Released:
6-Mar-2019 6:05 PM EST

Article ID: 709036

Chemical Pollutants in the Home Degrade Fertility in Both Men and Dogs, Study Finds

University of Nottingham

New research by scientists at the University of Nottingham suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs.

Released:
4-Mar-2019 12:10 PM EST

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