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Journal of Experimental Medicine

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Embargo will expire:
1-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709614

Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

British researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study, which will be published March 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting EZH2 could therefore be an effective treatment for AML, an aggressive blood cancer expected to kill over 10,000 people in the US alone this year.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 707611

German Researchers Discover How Sleep Can Fight an Infection

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered why sleep can sometimes be the best medicine. Sleep improves the potential ability of some of the body’s immune cells to attach to their targets, according to a new study that will be published February 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The study, led by Stoyan Dimitrov and Luciana Besedovsky at the University of Tübingen, helps explain how sleep can fight off an infection, whereas other conditions, such as chronic stress, can make the body more susceptible to illness.

Released:
6-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 707450

Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The study, which will be published February 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals the distinct roles played by two critical tumor suppressor genes that are commonly mutated in these highly lethal cancers.

Released:
4-Feb-2019 9:35 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706830

Study Suggests Aspirin May Help Some Patients Survive Head and Neck Cancer

The Rockefeller University Press

Regular use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may help some patients with head and neck cancer survive the disease, according to a study led by Professor Jennifer Grandis at the University of California, San Francisco. The study, which will be published January 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, indicates that NSAIDs are effective in patients with mutations in a gene called PIK3CA, likely by lowering the levels of an inflammatory molecule called prostaglandin E2.

Released:
22-Jan-2019 9:50 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706876

Anti-flu antibodies can inhibit two different viral proteins, NIH study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that antibodies that may form the basis of a universal flu vaccine inhibit a second viral protein in addition to the one that they bind. The study, to be published January 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that antibodies that recognize the viral surface protein hemagglutinin can also inhibit the viral neuraminidase, and that this enhances antibody neutralization of the virus and the activation of innate immune cells with anti-viral activity.

Released:
22-Jan-2019 2:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 706667

Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice

Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a gene therapy that blocks axonal degeneration, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706121

Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer’s disease, say USC researchers

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The study, which will be published January 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss.

Released:
8-Jan-2019 9:45 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705309

DNA “Webs” Aid Ovarian Cancer Metastasis, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that ovarian cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to new tissue after being caught in DNA "webs" extruded by immune cells. The study, which will be published December 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that preventing immune cells from forming these webs reduces metastasis in mice, suggesting that similar treatments could be used to limit the spread of ovarian cancer in humans.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704971

Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself

University of Notre Dame

In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells.

Released:
5-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

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