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110 of 147
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706384

Moving More in Old Age May Be Linked to Sharper Memory

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older adults who move more, either with daily exercise or even simple routine physical activity like housework, may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706386

Moving More in Old Age May Protect Brain from Dementia

Rush University Medical Center

Older adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
11-Jan-2019 4:45 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Dec-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705804

Kicking, Yelling During Sleep? Study Finds Risk Factors for Violent Sleep Disorder

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the December 26, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found men are more likely to have the disorder.

Released:
21-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Dec-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705551

In Just Six Months, Exercise May Help Those with Thinking Problems

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Getting the heart pumping with aerobic exercise, like walking or cycling for 35 minutes three times a week, may improve thinking skills in older adults with cognitive impairments, according to a study published in the December 19, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. After six months of exercise, study participants’ scores on thinking tests improved by the equivalent of reversing nearly nine years of aging.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 705148

New Generation of Therapeutics Based on Understanding of Aging Biology Show Promise for Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation

A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the December 7, 2018 online issue of Neurology®.

Released:
10-Dec-2018 3:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    28-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 704472

Study Finds Biases in Widely Used Dementia Identification Tests

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Quick tests used in primary care settings to identify whether people are likely to have dementia may often be wrong, according to a study published in the November 28, 2018, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
27-Nov-2018 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 704247

Orange Juice, Leafy Greens and Berries May Be Tied to Decreased Memory Loss in Men

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the November 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
19-Nov-2018 5:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703756

Migraines that Affect Vision May Increase Risk of Irregular Heartbeat

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who experience migraine with visual aura may have an increased risk of an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, according to a study published in the November 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
9-Nov-2018 6:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703637

Possible Treatment for Rare Polio-like Illness Shows No Benefit

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Researchers have been searching for possible treatments for the polio-like illness causing paralysis in children, called acute flaccid myelitis. But a new study shows no signal of efficacy for one potential treatment, the antidepressant fluoxetine. The study is published in the November 9, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
8-Nov-2018 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    31-Oct-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 703005

Good News! Study Says Life Span Normal When Parkinson’s Does Not Affect Thinking

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

In the past, researchers believed that Parkinson’s disease did not affect life expectancy. But recent studies showed a somewhat shorter life span. Now a new study suggests that when the disease does not affect thinking skills early on, life span is not affected. The study is published in the October 31, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
29-Oct-2018 4:50 PM EDT

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