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Neurology (journal)

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Embargo will expire:
20-Nov-2019 4:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
14-Nov-2019 5:05 PM EST

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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Nov-2019 4:00 PM EST

People Who Cannot Read May Be Three Times as Likely to Develop Dementia

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write. The study is published in the November 13, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cognition and Learning, Neuro, Rural Issues, Neurology (journal),

Released:
11-Nov-2019 2:25 PM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2019 4:00 PM EST

Trouble Sleeping? Insomnia Symptoms Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have trouble sleeping may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a study published in the November 6, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Neuro, Sleep, Neurology (journal),

Released:
31-Oct-2019 10:05 PM EDT
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-Oct-2019 4:00 PM EDT

How Will Your Thinking and Memory Change with Age?

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

How well eight-year-olds score on a test of thinking skills may be a predictor of how they will perform on tests of thinking and memory skills when they are 70 years old, according to a study published in the October 30, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that education level and socioeconomic status were also predictors of thinking and memory performance. Socioeconomic status was determined by people’s occupation at age 53.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cognition and Learning, Neuro, Neurology (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
25-Oct-2019 9:35 AM EDT
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Brain Injury from Concussion May Linger Longer than One Year After Return to Play

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

How long does it take an athlete to recover from a concussion? New research has found an athlete’s brain may still not be fully recovered one year after being allowed to return to play. The study is published in the October 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Channels: All Journal News, Neuro, Sports, Sports Medicine, Neurology (journal),

Released:
11-Oct-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington’s disease
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington’s disease

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington’s disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cell Biology, Neuro, Neurology (journal),

Released:
15-Oct-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Research Results
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Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine Identify Genetic Variation Linked to Severity of ALS

Wake Forest Baptist Health

A discovery made several years ago in a lab researching asthma at Wake Forest School of Medicine may now have implications for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease with no known cure and only two FDA-approved drugs to treat its progression and severity.

Channels: All Journal News, Genetics, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Neurology (journal),

Released:
16-Oct-2019 12:30 PM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Study Reveals More Women, Fewer Men Diagnosed with Cognitive Impairment When Tests are Adjusted for Sex

Study Reveals More Women, Fewer Men Diagnosed with Cognitive Impairment When Tests are Adjusted for Sex

Stony Brook Medicine

Using sex-specific scores on memory tests may change the diagnosis for 20 percent of those currently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), with possibly more women and fewer men being diagnosed with MCI, according to a new study published online in the journal Neurology.

Channels: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cognition and Learning, Neuro, Sex and Relationships, Neurology (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
10-Oct-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: New Diagnostic Criteria May Enable Earlier Detection of Cognitive Impairment in Women
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Oct-2019 4:00 PM EDT

New Diagnostic Criteria May Enable Earlier Detection of Cognitive Impairment in Women

University of California San Diego Health

Study finds when verbal memory test cut-offs were tailored to patient sex, more female patients and fewer male patients were considered to have amnesic mild cognitive impairment. This could change the way aMCI diagnoses are determined and make it easier to catch the condition in its early stages.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Neuro, Seniors, Women's Health, Neurology (journal),

Released:
4-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Oct-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Should Scores on Mild Cognitive Impairment Tests be Adjusted for Sex?

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Using sex-specific scores on memory tests may change who gets diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) by 20 percent, with possibly more women and fewer men being diagnosed, according to a study published in the October 9, 2019, online issue of Neurology®

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Neuro, Neurology (journal),

Released:
4-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Research Results

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