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Newswise: Sika deer overpopulation endangers beech forests in Southern Kyushu, Japan
Released: 25-Jan-2024 9:05 AM EST
Sika deer overpopulation endangers beech forests in Southern Kyushu, Japan
Kyushu University

A new study reveals how soil erosion caused by sika deer foraging reduces the growth of the beech trees.

Newswise: Did Sabertooth Tigers Purr or Roar?
Released: 21-Aug-2023 2:15 PM EDT
Did Sabertooth Tigers Purr or Roar?
North Carolina State University

When a sabertooth tiger called out, what noise did it make – a mighty roar or a throaty purr? A new study from North Carolina State University examined the data behind the arguments for each vocalization and found that the answer was more nuanced than they thought – and that it could depend on the shape of a few small bones.

Newswise: Wildfire Smoke Threatens Already Endangered Orangutans
Released: 15-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Wildfire Smoke Threatens Already Endangered Orangutans
Cornell University

Pronounced vocal and behavioral changes caused. by wildfire smoke make it possible to assess the health of wild orangutan populations by monitoring the frequency and quality of their sounds.

Newswise: Out of the frying pan: Coyotes, bobcats move into human-inhabited areas to avoid apex predators — only to be killed by people
Released: 19-May-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Out of the frying pan: Coyotes, bobcats move into human-inhabited areas to avoid apex predators — only to be killed by people
University of Washington

In Washington state, the presence of two apex predators — wolves and cougars — drives two mesopredator species — bobcats and coyotes — into areas with higher levels of human activity, with deadly results for the mesopredators.

Newswise: Study Shows Oil and Gas Infrastructure Hurting Nesting Birds In Globally Important Breeding Area in Arctic Alaska
Released: 2-May-2023 12:35 PM EDT
Study Shows Oil and Gas Infrastructure Hurting Nesting Birds In Globally Important Breeding Area in Arctic Alaska
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new WCS-led study that analyzed 17 years of migratory bird-nesting data in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, revealed that nest survival decreased significantly near high-use oil and gas infrastructure and its related noise, dust, traffic, air pollution, and other disturbances.

Newswise: Most plastic eaten by city vultures comes straight from food outlets
Released: 12-Apr-2023 1:15 PM EDT
Most plastic eaten by city vultures comes straight from food outlets
Frontiers

Since the 1950s, humanity has produced an estimated 8.3bn tons of plastic, adding a further 380m tons to this amount each year. Only 9% of this gets recycled.

Newswise: Northern and southern resident orcas hunt differently, which may help explain the decline of southern orcas
Released: 10-Mar-2023 8:00 AM EST
Northern and southern resident orcas hunt differently, which may help explain the decline of southern orcas
University of Washington

In the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia, southern resident orcas have experienced no net population growth since the 1970s. But northern resident orcas, with a similar diet and territory, have grown steadily. A new study may help explain why: The two populations differ in how they hunt for salmon, their primary and preferred food source.

Newswise:Video Embedded pregnant-shark-birth-tracking-technology-provides-key-data-for-species-protection
VIDEO
27-Feb-2023 12:05 AM EST
Pregnant Shark birth tracking technology provides key data for species protection
Arizona State University (ASU)

In a new study, researchers used new technologies to remotely document, for the first time in the wild, the location and timing of shark birth. Named the Birth-Alert-Tag (BAT), this new satellite tag remained inside the uterus, along with the developing shark pups, until the mother shark gave birth and expelled the newborn pups, along with the BAT, into the surrounding water. The BAT then floated to the surface and transmitted to satellites the location of where the shark birth took place. The first of its kind, the BATs were successfully deployed in a tiger shark and scalloped hammerhead shark, documenting the location birth.

Newswise: Experts have discovered how zebra stripes work
Released: 20-Feb-2023 4:05 AM EST
Experts have discovered how zebra stripes work
University of Bristol

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found why zebra fur is thinly striped and sharply outlined.

Newswise:Video Embedded watch-the-fastest-fish-in-the-world-hunt-its-prey-for-the-first-time
VIDEO
Released: 10-Feb-2023 9:45 AM EST
Watch the Fastest Fish in the World Hunt its Prey – For the First Time
Nova Southeastern University

Thanks to researchers at NSU’s Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI) who designed a novel electronic tag package incorporating high-tech sensors and a video camera, we now have for the first time, a detailed view of exactly how sailfish behave and hunt once they are on their own and out of view of the surface.

Newswise: First Report of Rare Cat Discovered on Mt. Everest
Released: 26-Jan-2023 10:35 AM EST
First Report of Rare Cat Discovered on Mt. Everest
Wildlife Conservation Society

Findings from a new paper published in Cat News have identified the first ever report of Pallas’s cat on Mount Everest, in the Sagarmatha National Park in Nepal.

Newswise: There’s something fishy about flake sold in South Australia
Released: 22-Jan-2023 11:05 PM EST
There’s something fishy about flake sold in South Australia
University of Adelaide

It is a popular takeaway choice at fish and chip shops, but new research has revealed threatened species of shark are being sold as flake at some outlets across South Australia. The University of Adelaide study is the first of its kind to examine flake fillets sold at South Australian fish and chip shops.

Newswise: Major Breakthrough As Scientists Sequence The Genomes Of Endangered Sharks
Released: 4-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Major Breakthrough As Scientists Sequence The Genomes Of Endangered Sharks
Nova Southeastern University

Scientists have sequenced the genomes of Critically Endangered great hammerhead and Endangered shortfin mako sharks for the first time.

Newswise: Female monkeys ‘actively reduce’ social network as they age
Released: 30-Nov-2022 1:50 PM EST
Female monkeys ‘actively reduce’ social network as they age
University of Exeter

Female rhesus macaques “actively reduce” their social networks and prioritise friends and family as they get older, new research shows.

Newswise: Photos Suggest Rhino Horns Have Shrunk Over Past Century, Likely Due to Hunting
Released: 1-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Photos Suggest Rhino Horns Have Shrunk Over Past Century, Likely Due to Hunting
University of Cambridge

By scrutinising over a century’s worth of photos, University of Cambridge researchers have made the first ever measurements that show rhinoceros horns have gradually decreased in size over time.

Released: 18-Oct-2022 12:50 PM EDT
Asian elephants prefer habitats on the boundaries of protected areas
British Ecological Society

New research, offering the most comprehensive analysis of Asian elephant movement and habitat preference to date, finds that elephants prefer habitats on the periphery of protected areas, rather than the areas themselves.

Newswise: Wildlife trade threatening unprotected animals
Released: 9-Oct-2022 9:05 PM EDT
Wildlife trade threatening unprotected animals
University of Adelaide

International trade in animals not regulated by multilateral agreements is putting them under increasing threat. More than three times the number of unregulated animal species are being imported into the United States compared to the number of regulated species. Closer monitoring of trade in these species is urgently required so that they may be protected.

Newswise: Lagoons from the Arctic’s “Forgotten Coast” Teem with Fish and Birds, Vulnerable to Climate Change and Human Development
Released: 6-Oct-2022 3:35 PM EDT
Lagoons from the Arctic’s “Forgotten Coast” Teem with Fish and Birds, Vulnerable to Climate Change and Human Development
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new scientific review article led by WCS captures the unique and dynamic characteristics of coastal lagoon ecosystems in the Arctic Beringia Region, and discusses how climate change effects and human development could alter these habitats.

Newswise: New York City coyotes do not need to rely on human food
Released: 28-Sep-2022 4:40 PM EDT
New York City coyotes do not need to rely on human food
PeerJ

Researchers in New York City (NYC) have analyzed the DNA of urban coyotes and discovered that the coyotes eat a variety of native prey species and supplemented with human-sourced food items.

Newswise: Browse, graze, mate: Food and company help animals in captivity
27-Sep-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Browse, graze, mate: Food and company help animals in captivity
University of Portsmouth

From tongue rolling alpacas to irritable yaks and perturbed pigs, new research has lifted the lid on why some farm and zoo animals cope well with captivity and others display signs of stress. Researchers from Aberystwyth and Portsmouth universities in the UK have published the first large-scale study to identify which species of hoofed animals, known as ungulates, are better suited to captive environments and which require better husbandry if kept in captivity.

Newswise: Three new species of ground snakes discovered under graveyards and churches in Ecuador
Released: 19-Sep-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Three new species of ground snakes discovered under graveyards and churches in Ecuador
Pensoft Publishers

A group of scientists led by Alejandro Arteaga, grantee of The Explorers Club Discovery Expeditions and researcher at Khamai Foundation, discovered three new cryptozoic (living underground) snakes hidden under graveyards and churches in remote towns in the Andes of Ecuador. The discovery was made official in a study published in the journal ZooKeys.

Newswise: How marine predators find food hot spots in open ocean “deserts”
Released: 7-Sep-2022 11:05 AM EDT
How marine predators find food hot spots in open ocean “deserts”
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new study led by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory (UW APL) finds that marine predators, such as tunas, billfishes and sharks, aggregate in anticyclonic, clockwise-rotating ocean eddies (mobile, coherent bodies of water). As these anticyclonic eddies move throughout the open ocean, the study suggests that the predators are also moving with them, foraging on the high deep-ocean biomass contained within.

Newswise: Marine Protected Areas in Antarctica should include young Emperor penguins, scientists say
Released: 31-Aug-2022 9:55 AM EDT
Marine Protected Areas in Antarctica should include young Emperor penguins, scientists say
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and European research institutions are calling for better protections for juvenile emperor penguins, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers listing the species under the Endangered Species Act and the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) considers expanding the network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the Southern Ocean.

Newswise: Wildlife hunting motivations vary across Africa and Europe
22-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Wildlife hunting motivations vary across Africa and Europe
PLOS

While motivations change with socio-economic context, hunting intensity is more constant.

Newswise: Asian Elephants Have a Nasal Pronunciation
Released: 23-Aug-2022 3:05 AM EDT
Asian Elephants Have a Nasal Pronunciation
University of Vienna

With the help of an acoustic camera that visualizes sound pressure, researchers from the University of Vienna investigated the calls of Asian elephants. The elephants emitted their low frequency “rumbles” mainly through their trunk or through their mouth and trunk simultaneously, and only seldomly through their mouth alone. This is the first study to conclusively demonstrate the combined oral and nasal call emission in a non-human animal. The study has recently been published in the journal “Animals”.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 3:50 PM EDT
Scientists issue plan for rewilding the American West
American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS)

As the effects of climate change mount, ecosystem restoration in the US West has garnered significant public attention, bolstered by President Joe Biden's America the Beautiful plan to conserve 30% of US land and water by 2030. Writing in BioScience, William J. Ripple and 19 colleagues follow up on the Biden plan with a proposal for a "Western Rewilding Network," comprising 11 large reserve areas already owned by the federal government.

Released: 27-Jul-2022 12:25 PM EDT
Parasites May Take a Heavier Toll on the Health of Mammal Populations Than Previously Thought, Study Suggests
University of Alberta

From cattle to uncontrolled wildlife, pesky but pervasive large parasites like tapeworms have a far greater impact on the total body health of their mammal hosts than previously known, new University of Alberta research suggests.

Newswise: Three New Species of Black-Bellied Salamander Found in Southern Appalachian Mountains
Released: 19-Jul-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Three New Species of Black-Bellied Salamander Found in Southern Appalachian Mountains
George Washington University

Three new species of black-bellied salamander have been discovered by a research team led by R. Alexander Pyron, the Robert F. Griggs Associate Professor of Biology at the George Washington University. The new salamanders, which are found in the southern Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States, stem from black-bellied populations that were long considered to be a single species.

Newswise: The Pair of Orcas Deterring Great White Sharks – by Ripping Open Their Torsos for Livers
Released: 30-Jun-2022 1:10 PM EDT
The Pair of Orcas Deterring Great White Sharks – by Ripping Open Their Torsos for Livers
Taylor & Francis

A pair of Orca (Killer Whales) that have been terrorizing and killing Great White Sharks off the coast of South Africa since 2017 has managed to drive large numbers of the sharks from their natural aggregation site.

Newswise:Video Embedded five-questions-fsu-sea-turtle-research-informs-environmental-policies
VIDEO
Released: 14-Jun-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Five Questions: FSU Sea Turtle Research Informs Environmental Policies
Florida State University

June 16 is World Sea Turtle Day, an occasion to consider the role these creatures play in the marine ecosystem. Florida State University Associate Professor Mariana Fuentes researches sea turtles and looks for ways to help turtles and humans coexist. She answered five questions about her work and how science can help inform public policy.

Released: 14-Jun-2022 9:30 AM EDT
Panthers now No. 1 predator of white-tailed deer in Southwest Florida
University of Georgia

A new study by the University of Georgia found Florida panthers are the No. 1 cause of mortality for white-tailed deer in Southwest Florida.

Newswise: How Shark Teeth Can Decipher Evolutionary Processes
Released: 12-May-2022 4:05 AM EDT
How Shark Teeth Can Decipher Evolutionary Processes
University of Vienna

From embryo to turtle cracker: a team led by palaeobiologist Julia Türtscher from the University of Vienna studied the multiple changes in tooth shape in the tiger shark. The study, recently published in the Journal of Anatomy, is also central in drawing conclusions about extinct species from the myriad of preserved shark teeth in the field of palaeontology.

Newswise: New Regional Bird Guides Simplify Identification
Released: 28-Apr-2022 10:50 AM EDT
New Regional Bird Guides Simplify Identification
Cornell University

There’s a brand-new series of seven field guides to help people learn about the birds found in their region of the United States and Canada.

Newswise: Study Confirms SARS-CoV-2 Related Coronaviruses in Trade-Confiscated Pangolins in Viet Nam
8-Mar-2022 12:45 PM EST
Study Confirms SARS-CoV-2 Related Coronaviruses in Trade-Confiscated Pangolins in Viet Nam
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study in the journal Frontiers in Public Health led by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) confirms that pangolins confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade in Viet Nam host SARS-CoV-2 related coronaviruses.

Released: 2-Mar-2022 11:05 AM EST
Joro spiders likely to spread beyond Georgia
University of Georgia

The Joro spider first arrived stateside around 2013 and has since spread across the state and Southeast. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests the invasive arachnids could spread through most of the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S.

Newswise: Small Water Samples Can Find Really Big Animals
Released: 1-Mar-2022 12:05 PM EST
Small Water Samples Can Find Really Big Animals
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of scientists used an emerging genetic tool that analyzes DNA in water samples to detect whales and dolphins in New York waters.

Newswise:Video Embedded edna-a-useful-tool-for-early-detection-of-invasive-green-crab
VIDEO
Released: 16-Feb-2022 12:35 PM EST
eDNA a useful tool for early detection of invasive green crab
University of Washington

As the European green crab invasion in Washington state worsens, a new analysis method developed by University of Washington and Washington Sea Grant scientists could help contain future invasions and prevent new outbreaks using water testing and genetic analysis.

Newswise: Birds Bring Us Together for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Released: 31-Jan-2022 10:35 AM EST
Birds Bring Us Together for the Great Backyard Bird Count
Cornell University

For a quarter of a century the annual Great Backyard Bird Count has been a bright spot for nature lovers. The 25th edition of the event is coming up February 18 through 21.

Newswise:Video Embedded penguin-takes-astounding-selfie-video
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jan-2022 11:55 AM EST
Penguin Takes Astounding Selfie Video
Wildlife Conservation Society

Just in time for Penguin Awareness Day (Thursday, January 20th), the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Argentina Program has released amazing underwater selfie video recently taken by a male Gentoo penguin fitted with a special camera.

Newswise: Understanding human-elephant conflict and vulnerability in the face of climate change
Released: 21-Dec-2021 10:50 AM EST
Understanding human-elephant conflict and vulnerability in the face of climate change
Northern Arizona University

How do climate change and human-elephant conflict affect household food security in Africa? NAU wildlife conservationist Duan Biggs spent three years with an international team of researchers investigating the dynamics between wildlife, people and the environment on the African savannah to better understand how both climate change and human-elephant conflict can impact household food insecurity in the region.

Released: 23-Nov-2021 3:10 PM EST
Scientists Find SARS CoV-2-Related Coronaviruses in Cambodian Bats from 2010
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of scientists have identified coronaviruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2 from two bats sampled in Cambodia more than a decade ago.

1-Nov-2021 5:05 AM EDT
Mongooses give bullies the cold shoulder, scientists find
University of Bristol

Dwarf mongooses remember which groupmates have picked fights with others during the day and later shun the aggressors during pre-bedtime socialising sessions, according to new research.

Released: 1-Nov-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Climate change will triple impacts to world’s “life zones” unless emission rates are dramatically reduced
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study from WCS and multiple partners that modeled changes in the world’s 45 different “life zones” from climate change revealed that climate impacts may soon triple over these areas if the earth continues “business-as-usual” emissions.

Newswise: Giant pandas’ distinctive black and white markings provide effective camouflage, study finds
26-Oct-2021 8:40 AM EDT
Giant pandas’ distinctive black and white markings provide effective camouflage, study finds
University of Bristol

The high-contrast pattern of giant pandas helps them blend in with their natural environment.

Newswise: First-Ever Africa-Wide Great Ape Assessment Reveals Human Activity, not Habitat Availability, is Greatest Driver of Ape Abundance
Released: 21-Oct-2021 9:15 AM EDT
First-Ever Africa-Wide Great Ape Assessment Reveals Human Activity, not Habitat Availability, is Greatest Driver of Ape Abundance
Wildlife Conservation Society

The first-ever Africa-wide assessment of great apes – gorillas, bonobos and chimpanzees – finds that human factors, including roads, population density and GDP, determine abundance more than ecological factors such as forest cover.

Released: 11-Oct-2021 1:15 PM EDT
The unknown consequences of plastic’s legacy, found in seabirds around the world
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Seabirds from Gough Island in the south Atlantic, Marion Island near Antarctica and the coasts of both Hawaii and Western Australia have a dangerous habit: eating plastic.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-and-citizen-scientists-complete-first-ever-weddell-seal-count
VIDEO
24-Sep-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Researchers and citizen scientists complete first-ever Weddell seal count
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A research team led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has completed a first-ever global population estimate of Weddell seals in Antarctica, showing that there are significantly fewer seals than previously thought. Documenting the seals’ population trends over time will help scientists better understand the effects of climate change and commercial fishing.

Released: 16-Sep-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Study reveals gophers’ biofluorescence
University of Georgia

Researcher discovers that the underground species has a secret glow

Newswise:Video Embedded whoop-new-autonomous-method-precisely-detects-endangered-whale-vocalizations
VIDEO
Released: 15-Sep-2021 8:30 AM EDT
‘Whoop’ – New Autonomous Method Precisely Detects Endangered Whale Vocalizations
Florida Atlantic University

One of the frequently used methods to monitor endangered whales is called passive acoustics technology, which doesn’t always perform well.

Newswise:Video Embedded octo-girl-takes-a-deep-dive-to-discover-how-diverse-octopus-species-coexist
VIDEO
Released: 14-Sep-2021 8:30 AM EDT
‘Octo Girl’ Takes a Deep Dive to Discover How Diverse Octopus Species Coexist
Florida Atlantic University

A first in situ, long-term study explored how the common octopus, a medium-sized octopus widely distributed in tropical and temperate seas worldwide and the Atlantic longarm octopus, a small species of octopus found in the Atlantic Ocean and elsewhere, coexist by examining their foraging habits and tactics, diet, behaviors and when they are active or inactive. Results show that their very different behaviors and habits is exactly how these two species coexist in a shallow Florida lagoon- even at high densities.


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