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Embargo will expire:
21-Oct-2018 6:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

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Embargo will expire:
21-Oct-2018 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
12-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Oct-2018 12:00 AM EDT

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If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Sep-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700190

ADHD May Increase Risk of Parkinson’s Disease and Similar Disorders

University of Utah Health

Researchers at University of Utah Health found that ADHD patients had an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s and Parkinson-like diseases than individuals with no ADHD history.

Released:
7-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699928

Marmosets Serve as an Effective Model for Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Small, New World monkeys called marmosets can mimic the sleep disturbances, changes in circadian rhythm, and cognitive impairment people with Parkinson’s disease develop, according to a new study by scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute.

Released:
5-Sep-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699463

Explainer: What is inflammation?

Van Andel Research Institute

Inflammation is the body’s reaction to a harmful stimulus, such as infection with a virus like the flu, an injury like a cut or scrape or chronic conditions such as Crohn’s disease. Although it is a normal and important part of our immune system’s defenses, when it sticks around too long it can be

Released:
30-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699468

How to Improve Cell Replacement Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Researchers found a new cell surface marker on stem cells induced to become dopamine neurons, which allow isolation of a more beneficial population of induced neurons for cell replacement therapy. Animals that received a transplant sorted using the new marker fared better than their counterparts with a typical transplant.

Released:
23-Aug-2018 3:30 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699192

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation May Help Treat Symptoms of Rare Movement Disorders

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Electrical stimulation of the brain and spinal cord may help treat the symptoms of rare movement disorders called neurodegenerative ataxias, according to a study published in the August 22, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
17-Aug-2018 4:40 PM EDT

Article ID: 699087

Study: The Eyes May Have It, an Early Sign of Parkinson’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson’s disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells. The study is published in the August 15, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699083

Brain Response Study Upends Thinking About Why Practice Speeds Up Motor Reaction Times

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that a computerized study of 36 healthy adult volunteers asked to repeat the same movement over and over became significantly faster when asked to repeat that movement on demand—a result that occurred not because they anticipated the movement, but because of an as yet unknown mechanism that prepared their brains to replicate the same action.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

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