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Showing results 1120 of 798

Article ID: 702831

Communication matters: New program eases staff-family conflict in assisted living

Cornell University

New research from Cornell University shows an effective approach to reduce staff-family conflict in assisted living facilities in order to ensure the well-being of residents in care.

Released:
25-Oct-2018 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 702747

The Marriage Benefit

Family Institute at Northwestern University

It has long been understood that there is a connection between long-term relationships and health. There is also a reciprocal relationship between marriage and health, where not only is marriage affected by illness, but the quality of marriage can actually influence the course of an illness.

Released:
24-Oct-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 702547

When you are unhappy in a relationship, why do you stay? The answer may surprise you.

University of Utah

Why do people stay in unsatisfying romantic relationships? A new study suggests it may be because they view leaving as bad for their partner. The study, being published in the November 2018 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, explored the possibility that people deciding whether to end a relationship consider not only their own desires but also how much they think their partner wants and needs the relationship to continue.

Released:
22-Oct-2018 9:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    15-Oct-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701986

When Ignoring Your Spouse Can Help Your Relationship

American Psychological Association (APA)

WASHINGTON -- It is a classic relationship stalemate: One partner asks the other to change something and the partner who is asked shuts down. But that type of response may actually be beneficial for the relationship of lower-income couples, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Conversely, withdrawing can negatively affect higher-income couples’ relationship satisfaction, the study found.

Released:
10-Oct-2018 12:35 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mind-Flock-Trivia-with-Students.jpg

Article ID: 702034

UNH Researchers Find Video Games Effective for Bystander Intervention in Sexual Assaults

University of New Hampshire

As recent news headlines have shown, bystanders can play a pivotal role when it comes to sexual assault and relationship violence. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that video games show promise as a tool to share information and influence bystander attitudes and efficacy in situations of sexual violence.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 10:20 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 701424

Researchers: Redesign Dating Apps to Overcome Racial Bias

Cornell University

Mobile dating apps that allow users to filter their searches by race – or rely on algorithms that pair up people of the same race – reinforce racial divisions and biases, according to a new paper by Cornell University researchers.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 4:15 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 700562

Maintaining Balance in Your Relationship

Family Institute at Northwestern University

Every marriage has an invisible emotional bank account. We make deposits into the account through acts of kindness, words of admiration, gestures of support, and more. We make withdrawals from the account by moments of unkindness, harsh or unfair criticism, words or actions that trigger hurt feelings, and more.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 700399

UNH to Study Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Sexual Minority College Students

University of New Hampshire

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will undertake the largest study ever conducted on intimate partner violence among lesbian, gay, bisexual and other sexual minority college students thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Released:
13-Sep-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 700457

With STDs at an all-time high, why aren’t more people getting a proven treatment? U-M team examines reasons

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly 2.3 million times last year, Americans learned they had a sexually transmitted disease. But despite these record-high infection rates for chlamydia and gonorrhea, most patients only receive treatment for their own infection – when they probably could get antibiotics or a prescription for their partner at the same time. A team of physicians examines the barriers that stand in the way of getting expedited partner therapy to more people.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 7:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 700404

New Study First to Report Sexual Behavior Norms Among U.S. Adults with Dementia Living at Home

University of Chicago Medical Center

The majority of partnered, home-dwelling people in the U.S. with dementia are sexually active, according to a University of Chicago Medicine study out this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT

Showing results 1120 of 798

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