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Article ID: 720595

New Test Diagnoses Lyme Disease within 15 Minutes

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret. Columbia biomedical engineers have developed a rapid microfluidic test that can detect Lyme disease with similar performance as the STT in a much shorter time—15 minutes.

Released:
11-Oct-2019 11:30 AM EDT
Newswise: Sixteen ASCB Fellows to be welcomed at 2019 meeting of cell biologists this December

Article ID: 720566

Sixteen ASCB Fellows to be welcomed at 2019 meeting of cell biologists this December

American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is pleased to present its cohort of 16 new Fellows for 2019.

Released:
10-Oct-2019 6:05 PM EDT

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English

Embargo will expire:
17-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
10-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720282

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung’s airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720345

Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer’s

Washington University in St. Louis

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that microglia drive neurodegeneration in diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, that are linked to tau protein. Targeting microglia may help treat such diseases.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Humans Have Salamander-Like Ability to Regrow Cartilage in Joints

Article ID: 720456

Humans Have Salamander-Like Ability to Regrow Cartilage in Joints

Duke Clinical Research Institute

Contrary to popular belief, cartilage in human joints can repair itself through a process similar to that used by creatures such as salamanders and zebrafish to regenerate limbs, researchers at Duke Health found.

Released:
9-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Newswise: New Insights Into How to Protect Premature Babies From Common Brain Disorder
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 720423

New Insights Into How to Protect Premature Babies From Common Brain Disorder

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Premature babies have delicate brain tissue that is prone to bleeding and can result in post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, a dangerous condition that leads to excess fluid accumulation and brain dysfunction. Now, scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified a new disease mechanism and potential molecular drug target that may protect premature newborns from developing the brain disorder. The study was published in Science Advances.

Released:
8-Oct-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Algorithm Personalizes Which Cancer Mutations Are Best Targets for Immunotherapy
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720274

Algorithm Personalizes Which Cancer Mutations Are Best Targets for Immunotherapy

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

As tumor cells multiply, they often spawn tens of thousands of genetic mutations. Figuring out which ones are the most promising to target with immunotherapy is like finding a few needles in a haystack. Now a new model hand-picks those needles so they can be leveraged in more effective, customized cancer vaccines.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720374

Greater Understanding of Tumor Cell Biomechanics Could Lead to Improved Treatment

National Academy of Sciences (NAS)

At the cellular level, cancer can be viewed as a mechanical engineering challenge. The disease alters the structure and function of cells and tissues, which are meant to perform very specific tasks.

Released:
8-Oct-2019 11:30 AM EDT

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