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Article ID: 572992

Chance of Surviving “Shockable” Cardiac Arrests When Bystanders Use an Automated External Defibrillator Are Excellent in Big, Public Venues

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A study of more than 14,000 men and women whose hearts stopped suddenly suggests that the chances of survival are very high if such cardiac arrests are witnessed in large public venues, including airports, sports arenas or malls. The reasons, researchers say, are that almost four out of five such cases appear to be due to a survivable type of heart rhythm disruption and that big places with lots of people are more likely to have an automated external defibrillator, or AED device, handy, along with those who can apply it as well as CPR.

Released:
2-Feb-2011 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 572913

Scientists Convert Skin Cells to Beating Heart Cells

Scripps Research Institute

Breakthrough discovery offers hope for new therapies for range of diseases.

Released:
31-Jan-2011 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 572817

Food-Borne Bacteria Causes Potentially Fatal Heart Infection

University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have found that particular strains of a food-borne bacteria are able to invade the heart, leading to serious and difficult to treat heart infections. Their study is available online in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

Released:
26-Jan-2011 1:45 PM EST

Article ID: 572658

New Study Evaluates Replacing Heart Valve Through Tiny Puncture Hole

Houston Methodist

Physicians will replace diseased cardiac valves through a single, tiny puncture hole in the patient's groin, as part of a research study.

Released:
24-Jan-2011 7:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jan-2011 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 572516

HEPA Filters Reduce Cardiovascular Health Risks Associated with Air Pollution

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Using inexpensive air filters may help reduce cardiovascular disease risk that results from exposure to air pollution, according to researchers from Canada, who studied healthy adultsliving in a small community in British Columbia where wood burning stoves are the main sources of pollution. The researchers found that high efficiency particle air (HEPA)filters reduced the amount of airborne particulate matter, resulting in improved blood vessel health and reductions in blood markers that are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Released:
18-Jan-2011 10:15 AM EST

Article ID: 572638

Acute Coronary Syndrome Carries High Costs for Employers

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Employees with myocardial infarction (heart attack) and other types of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are a major source of direct and indirect health costs, reports a study in the January Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

Released:
20-Jan-2011 2:00 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jan-2011 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 572352

Stroke Rate Rises for Patients with HIV Infection

University of California San Diego Health

While the overall hospitalization rate for stroke has declined in recent years, the numbers have jumped dramatically for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), suggesting they may be up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than people uninfected by the virus that causes AIDS.

Released:
11-Jan-2011 1:15 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jan-2011 7:00 PM EST

Article ID: 572492

Mechanical Versus Manual CPR—Too Close to Call

Health Behavior News Service

A systematic review comparing mechanical to manual chest compressions has failed to demonstrate that one is superior to the other.

Released:
17-Jan-2011 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2011 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 572491

Kidney Gene Implicated in Increased Heart Failure Risk

Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists have identified the first DNA sequence variant common in the population that is not only associated with an increased risk of heart failure, but appears to play a role in causing it. The variant, a change in a single letter of the DNA sequence, impairs channels that control kidney function.

Released:
14-Jan-2011 4:55 PM EST

Showing results 29812990 of 3320

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