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Article ID: 702091

How Parenting Can Cause Antisocial Behaviors in Children

Michigan State University

Children who experience less parental warmth and more harshness in their home environments may be more aggressive and lack empathy and a moral compass, according to a study by researchers at Michigan State University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan. The study is published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 702078

UNC Chosen to Establish National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

The Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) has been awarded the first grant for a new federal program that will provide $3.75 million over five years to establish UNC as the National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702056

Nerve Stimulation in Mice Suggests New Way to Reduce Delirium After Surgery

Duke Health

or adults over age 65, surgical complications can dampen not only their physical health but also their mental sharpness, with more than half of high-risk cases declining into delirium. In new Duke University research, scientists show in a mouse model that a current treatment for seizures can also reverse brain inflammation, such as inflammation after surgery, and the subsequent confusion or cognitive decline that results.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702035

$1M Women’s Health Research Prize Goes Toward Studying Role of Placenta in Congenital Heart Defects

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

The inaugural Magee Prize was awarded to Pitt's Dr. Yaacov Barak to research in how placental defects may lead to congenital heart defects.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 701970

Researcher Explores How an Immune System Problem May Sabotage Depression Treatment

West Virginia University

Elizabeth Engler-Chiurazzi, a research assistant professor in WVU’s School of Medicine, and her colleagues at WVU are among the first researchers to make the connection between B cells and the effectiveness of antidepressants.

Released:
10-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701941

Wired for Life: Study Links Infants' Brain Circuitry to Future Health

Cedars-Sinai

Growth rates of brain circuits in infancy may help experts predict what a child's intelligence and emotional health could be when the child turns 4, a new study has found. Along with prior research, these findings could help future physicians identify cognitive and behavioral challenges in the first months and years of life, leading to early treatment.

Released:
9-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701853

Nursing Faculty Members find a link between Childhood Adversity, Burnout and Depression in Nursing Students

University of Texas at El Paso

A study on childhood adversity at The University of Texas at El Paso School of Nursing found that undergraduate nursing students who were exposed to a higher number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) – such as abuse, neglect or family dysfunction - encountered higher levels of burnout and depression.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT

Education

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Article ID: 701780

Best Practices, Not Individual Preferences, Bring Job Satisfaction

University of Alabama

Though employees may like their work to cater to their individual preferences, they are predictably more satisfied when the organizational culture matches a set of widely preferred characteristics that provide a fair, supportive and stable work environment.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 700983

Exposure of Mothers to Terror Attacks during Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Schizophrenia in Their Children

University of Haifa

The children of mothers exposed to terror attacks during pregnancy are 2.5 times more likely to develop schizophrenia than mothers not to exposed to terror during pregnancy. This was the finding of a comprehensive study undertaken at the University of Haifa.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 8:05 AM EDT

Showing results 2130 of 2623

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