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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Oct-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701160

Making SNAP Healthier with Food Incentives and Disincentives Could Improve Health and Save Costs

Tufts University

A new Food-PRICE study from researchers at Tufts and Harvard estimates that up to one million cardiovascular and diabetes events and $42 billion could be saved in healthcare costs using incentives and/or disincentives to improve food choices among participants in SNAP.

Released:
26-Sep-2018 1:50 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

  • Embargo expired:
    2-Oct-2018 10:45 AM EDT

Article ID: 701397

Bad News for Crash Dieters: Rat Study Finds More Belly Fat, Less Muscle After Extreme Calorie Reduction

American Physiological Society (APS)

Extreme dieting causes short-term body changes that may have long-term health consequences, according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 2:30 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    2-Oct-2018 10:45 AM EDT

Article ID: 701398

High-fat, High-sugar Diet May Impair Future Fertility in Females

American Physiological Society (APS)

The differences in the way males and females respond to a high-fat, high-sugar diet may include impairment of female fertility, new research suggests. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 2:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 701451

Risk of Hospital Readmission High for “Broken Heart” Syndrome

NYU Langone Health

Patients with “broken heart” syndrome still face considerable risk of hospital readmission and in-hospital death.

Released:
2-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT
Heartbeat_Chugh_10-02-18.jpg

Article ID: 701444

Weekday Mornings Are No Longer Peak Times for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Cedars-Sinai

Heart experts have long believed that weekday mornings – and especially Mondays – were the danger zones for unexpected deaths from sudden cardiac arrests. But a new Cedars-Sinai study shows those peak times have disappeared and now, sudden cardiac arrests are more likely to happen on any day at any time.

Released:
2-Oct-2018 5:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Oct-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701287

Delayed Pregnancy = Heart Health Risks for Moms and Sons, Study Shows

American Physiological Society (APS)

Delaying pregnancy may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in both women and their children, with boys at higher risk of disease, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Alberta in Canada will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

Released:
28-Sep-2018 1:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 701377

Learn to Save a Life This October

Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Health System urges the general public, especially students, to learn lifesaving CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator to reduce sudden cardiac death rates.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    28-Sep-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701238

Diagnostic Protocol Effective in Identifying Emergency Room Patients with Acute Chest Pain Who Are Suitable for Early Discharge

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

A relatively new accelerated diagnostic protocol is effective in identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain who can be safely sent home without being hospitalized or undergoing comprehensive cardiac testing, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Released:
27-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
COPDgraphic.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    28-Sep-2018 12:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 701066

Kidney Disease Biomarker May Also Be a Marker for COPD

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

A commonly used biomarker of kidney disease may also indicate lung problems, particularly COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Showing results 2130 of 3363

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