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Article ID: 704896

INSTITUTE OF HUMAN VIROLOGY RESEARCHERS DISCOVER THAT A BACTERIAL PROTEIN PROMOTES CANCER

University of Maryland Medical Center/School of Medicine

The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell’s ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST

Article ID: 704871

Immunotherapy Pioneers Unveil Updated Efficacy Data of Single Infusion of Tisagenlecleucel CAR T-cell Therapy

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Physician-scientists from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia presented updated efficacy and safety data on Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) --the first-ever FDA-approved personalized CAR T-cell gene immunotherapy for aggressive blood cancers, at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting, as well as first-of-its-kind research on overcoming CAR T-cell resistance.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 704875

Natural selection in the womb can explain health problems in adulthood

Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Conditions encountered in the womb - when the embryo consists of only about 100 cells - can have life-long impact on health. Scientists previously assumed that this is because embryos respond to adverse conditions by programming their gene expression. Now an international team of researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Wageningen University and Research, Lund University, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York propose a radically different alternative. Rather than being programmed by the environment, random differences in gene expression may provide some embryos with a survival advantage, in particular when conditions are harsh. By studying DNA methylation, an important mechanism to control gene activity, the researchers found that a specific part of the DNA methylation pattern was missing among famine-exposed individuals. The findings are published in the journal Cell Reports.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 12:55 PM EST
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Article ID: 704885

Innovative Stem Cell Therapeutic Strategy May be Transformative for Heart Failure Treatment

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute and the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute

The FDA has approved an investigational new drug clinical trial that will start shortly at MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute, to determine whether stem cell therapy improves myocardial function in patients with severe heart failure—severe enough to require the implantation of a left ventricular assist device, or LVAD.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 704856

Gene Therapy for Blood Disorders

University of Delaware

Delivering gene-regulating material to cells that live deep in our bone marrow and direct the formation of blood cells. That would be a major step forward in gene therapy and a team of UD researchers has taken that step.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:30 AM EST

Article ID: 704857

Moffitt Researchers Identify Novel Mechanism to Thwart KRas-driven Tumor Growth

Moffitt Cancer Center

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center are trying to devise alternative mechanisms to block KRas. Their recent study demonstrates that the protein GSK3 is an important mediator of KRas-dependent tumor viability. Their research was published today in Nature Communications.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

Article ID: 704858

Científicos de Mayo dicen que apixabán oral es seguro y eficaz para tratamiento de coágulos sanguíneos en pacientes oncológicos

Mayo Clinic

Los científicos de Mayo Clinic descubrieron que un fármaco oral, el apixabán que sirve para tratar coágulos sanguíneos en los pacientes que reciben terapia oncológica, es seguro y eficaz.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704861

Penn’s Basser Center for BRCA Chooses Memorial Sloan Kettering, Cornell University Researcher Maria Jasin for 2018 Basser Global Prize

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Basser Center for BRCA at Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center, the world’s first comprehensive center aimed at advancing research, treatment, and prevention of BRCA-related cancers, has announced Maria Jasin, PhD, as the recipient of the sixth annual Basser Global Prize. Jasin is a member of the Developmental Biology Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a professor at the Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Cornell University.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

Article ID: 704860

Research Finds Rivaroxaban Significantly Reduced Blood Clots and Blood Clot-Related Death in Cancer Patients

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland Clinic medical oncologist and researcher, Alok Khorana, M.D., is the primary investigator on a study that concluded rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE), a blood clot in the venous system, significantly reduced VTE and VTE-related death for outpatient, at-risk cancer patients while they were taking the oral blood thinner. During the on-treatment period, blood clots occurred less frequently (2.62 percent) in patients taking rivaroxaban, compared to and 6.41 percent of the placebo groups. However, during the full study period – which included 180-day observation after the medication was stopped ¬– the gap narrowed with blood clots occurring in 5.95 percent of patients in the rivaroxaban group, compared to 8.79 percent of the placebo groups.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704859

New Cancer Immunotherapy Approach Turns Immune Cells into Tiny Anti-Tumor Drug Factories

University of California San Diego Health

In lab and mouse experiments, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

Showing results 2130 of 6202

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